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Downtime Events

The following events are examples of the sort of random encounters a GM can add to the downtime system. Rolling for events occurs during the Event phase.

The first set of events consists of events that could happen to any kind of building—bad weather, a fire, a famous visitor, and so on. Following those generic events are specific events keyed to certain types of buildings—an Inn has different events than a Military Academy or Smithy. This section concludes with events for several kinds of organizations. Not every building and organization has its own event table—the GM should use the Generic Building Events table or take inspiration from this section to make tables for other buildings and organizations.

If you don’t own any buildings or organizations in a settlement, the GM can use these event tables to create events for buildings you are in or near. For example, the GM can use the Tavern Events table to generate an event while you are at a tavern. The event descriptions assume that you are the owner, so the GM should adjust the outcome if you are merely present for an event.

These tables are designed so low rolls tend to be beneficial and high rolls are harmful or dangerous. If you’re using the settlement danger value, add the danger value to the percentile roll. Some results have you roll on another event table. Reroll any results that don’t make sense.

Many events allow a skill check to affect the outcome of the event. If you’re present, either attempt this skill check yourself or ask another member of the party or a manager to attempt the check for you. If you’re absent, either your representative (such as a cohort or manager) attempts the check or roll 1d20 with no bonuses to determine the result. The GM can also allow methods other than those listed to end harmful events. For example, you might be able to end an ongoing rivalry event by befriending the owner of the rival business or driving him out of town.

Table: Generic Building Events
d% Event
01–02 Good fortune
03–08 Day of rest
09–12 Good weather
13–15 Famous visitor
16–65 Building-specific Event
66–73 Rumormongering
74–77 Good weather
78–80 Fire
81–82 Deadly accident
83–84 Infestation
85–88 Rivalry
89–90 Sickness
91–94 Taxes
95–98 Criminal activity
99–100 Roll twice

Bad Weather: a particularly bad patch of weather plagues the area. There’s a 10% chance the weather is devastating. Attempt a DC 20 Survival check. If you succeed, you’ve anticipated the weather and your building is unaffected. If you fail, the bad weather damages some of your supplies, and you lose 1d4 points of Goods. If the bad weather is devastating, your building gains the broken condition.

Building-Specific Event: Roll on the specific table for your building. If there is no event table for that kind of building, reroll this result.

Criminal Activity: The building is targeted by petty criminals. You can spend 2d4 points of Influence to cause them to leave you alone, negating this event. Otherwise, attempt a DC 20 Intimidate check. If you succeed, the criminals are caught and you gain 1 point of Influence. Otherwise, the criminals rob your building, and you lose 1d8 points of Goods.

Day of Rest: It’s an unusually relaxing day. Nothing bad happens, and minor events seem to conspire to make all the little things work out perfectly. People are well rested and in good spirits. You gain 1d3 points of Labor.

Deadly Accident: Someone has a dreadful accident in or near your building. Roll 1d6; on a 1–4, the victim is a random employee or building resident, and on a 5–6, the victim is a visitor or passerby. The GM determines the type of accident. The victim is hurt badly and is dying. a successful DC 15 Heal check or the application of any magical healing prevents death. If the person dies, you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Famous Visitor: Someone famous visits the settlement. This could be a beloved actress, a vaunted hero, a celebrated noble, or the like. Attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy check. On a success, the famous visitor visits your building, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. Otherwise you’re snubbed and lose 1d2 points of Influence.

Fire: a fire breaks out in your building. There’s a 75% chance it’s just a minor fire that costs you 1d2 points of Goods, but otherwise it’s a major fire and becomes a significant danger. For a major fire, unless you utilize magic like quench , pyrotechnics , or other fire-suppressing tactics, you lose 2d6 points of Goods, Labor, or Magic (splitting this cost up however you wish) and your building gains the broken condition.

Good Fortune: You have a run of good luck. For 7 days, this building gains a +4 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. In addition, the next time you roll a building event, you can roll twice and take either result.

Good Weather: The beautiful weather boosts morale and business. The building gets a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Infestation: You have uninvited guests — spiders in the cellar, stirges in the attic, rats in the walls, or something similarly unpleasant. As long as your building is infested, it takes a -10 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each day the infestation continues, you lose 1 point of Goods, Labor, or Magic (chosen randomly, reroll if it’s a type of capital you don’t have). To end an infestation, you must succeed at a DC 20 Handle Animal or Survival check; the DC increases by 1 for each day the infestation persists (maximum DC 30). Alternatively, the GM may allow you to resolve the infestation with a combat encounter.

Rivalry: a rival starts to work against you. At the start of each Income phase, you must succeed at a DC 20 skill check (with a skill that makes sense for the type of building) or either lose 1d2 points of Influence or give the building a –5 penalty on its checks to generate currency for 1d10 days (50% chance of either penalty). You may attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Diplomacy check once per day to end the rivalry. Success means the rivalry ends (as does any ongoing penalty from this event). Failure means the rivalry continues. The rivalry ends automatically the next time you roll this event (this doesn’t replace the old rivalry with a new one).

Rumormongering: People are talking about you. Attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy check. On a success, word spreads far that your presence in the region is valuable and welcomed, and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. On a failure, the rumors are not so complimentary (and perhaps even insulting), and you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Sickness: Your employees have become sick, and any earnings from this building today are halved. Attempt a DC 15 Heal check at the end of each day—on a success, your employees get well enough to work. If you fail, the sickness persists to the next day. Each day sickness persists, you have a 20% chance of losing 1d2 points of Labor.

Taxes: You must pay some unexpected taxes. You can either pay the tax amount (1% of the total gp value of your building) or attempt a DC 20 Bluff check to talk your way out of the taxes. If you succeed, you don’t have to pay these taxes. If you fail, the tax owed doubles and you can’t talk your way out of it.

Building-specific Events

Table: Alchemist Events
d% Event
01–10 Discovery
11–30 Cold remedy
31–40 Healing potion demand
41–45 Embarrassing affliction
46–55 Cosmetic problem
56–70 Accidental poisoning
71–80 Contamination
81–85 Unstable mutation
86–95 Explosion
96–100 Outbreak

Accidental Poisoning: An inept employee accidentally poisons one of your customers—enough to debilitate the customer for a few days, but not enough to cause a fatality. You lose 1 point of Influence. There’s a 25% chance this customer is actually a rival alchemist snooping around, in which case your rival’s shop is closed for 1d6 days, and because of the lack of competition your business gains a +5 bonus during that time on its first check each day to generate capital.

Contamination: Rat poison, laxative, or some other dangerous product spills into the rest of your wares, forcing you to throw out the contaminated inventory. You lose 1d6 for 1d6 days Goods or Influence, divided as you see fit. Alternatively, you may continue to sell the tainted product, treating this event as an accidental poisoning (01–50), cosmetic problem (51–90), or outbreak (91–100).

Cold Remedy: Your create a treatment for a minor illness currently making the rounds in the settlement. You gain 1 point of Influence, and the building gains a +5 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Cosmetic Problem: a batch of bad potions causes side effects such as abnormal hair growth or loss, skin discoloration, warts, or unusual body odor. You lose 1d2 points of Magic and 1d3 points of Influence.

Discovery: The introduction of a new material makes your alchemical recipes more potent, leading to booming sales. For 1d6 days, the business gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Embarrassing Affliction: a wealthy merchant, noble, or other person of note privately asks for help with a personal problem, such as halitosis or bedroom performance problems. If you succeed at a DC 20 Craft (alchemy) check, you discreetly deal with the problem and gain 1d4 points of Influence; there’s a 10% chance the customer recommends you to someone with a similar problem and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. If you fail, there is no effect, but this doesn’t reflect poorly on you because the customer wishes to keep the problem private.

Explosion: Crafting goes awry or dangerous reagents are spilled, causing an explosion. You lose 1d2 points of Goods and must attempt a DC 20 Survival check. If you fail, your building catches fire, as the fire event, except there is a 50% chance of a minor fire and a 50% chance of a major fire.

Healing potion demand: Local temples have a healing potion shortage and ask you to help pick up the slack with alchemical remedies. Attempt a DC 20 Craft (alchemy) check. If you succeed, the healers praise you and you gain 1 point of Influence and 1d2 points of Magic. Otherwise, the healers badmouth your incompetence or unwillingness to help, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence.

Outbreak: Something in your shop is making people sick—perhaps a bad reaction created poisonous gas, a monstrous ingredient carries a lingering disease, or a rival alchemist planted something dangerous. Attempt a DC 30 Craft (alchemy) check. If you succeed, you remedy the problem before it causes any permanent harm. Otherwise, treating and compensating the victims costs you 1d3 points of Goods, 1d4 points of Influence, and 1 point of Magic.

Unstable Mutation: a alchemical mishap causes one employee to temporarily mutate into a hideous, clumsy creature. Either you hide the employee in your business, losing 1d2 points of Goods per day for 1d3 days as the employee accidentally breaks merchandise, or you send the employee home and the building takes a –5 penalty on its next 1d3 checks to generate capital since people know about this incident.

Table: Bardic College Events
d% Event
01–10 Visiting master
11–25 Prodigy
26–30 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
31–50 Supply shortage
51–60 Hazardous stage
61–70 Stolen instrument
71–75 Failing adept
76–85 Vandalism
86–95 Adept student
96–100 Hazing gone wrong

Adept Student: Harnessing your newest protege’s remarkable talent requires extra attention from you, lest a rival college steal her away. If you spend 1d2 points of Influence per day for 1d6 days, the student remains at your school. Otherwise, the student leaves, you lose 1d6 points of Influence, and the building generates half the normal amount of capital for 1d6 days.

Failing Adept: a favored student is getting bad grades in all of his classes, and you must do some creative bookkeeping to keep him at the school. Attempt a DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check to convince the instructors to give him another chance. Failure means you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Hazardous Stage: The college’s stage needs renovations. You must spend 1 point of Labor or succeed at a DC 15 Craft (carpentry) check to make sure reconstruction goes smoothly. If you don’t, a student breaks through the stage floor during rehearsal, costing you 1 point of Labor and halving the capital the building generates for 1d6 days.

Hazing Gone Wrong: This is the same as the event of this name on Table: Magical Academy Events.

Prodigy: One of your students turns out to be a prodigy. You gain 1d4 points of Influence, and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Stolen Instrument: One student’s valuable instrument has been stolen right before an important performance. If you succeed at a DC 30 Perform check, you find a suitable replacement and offers from investors gain you 1d3 points of Goods. Otherwise, you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Supply Shortage: a shortage in teaching supplies makes it difficult for instructors to do their jobs. You lose 1d6 points of Goods and Labor, divided as you see fit.

Vandalism: Someone has defaced your curtains with obscenities on opening night. You may spend 1d6 points of Goods and Influence, divided as you see fit, to fix the curtains. If you don’t, you must succeed at a DC 25 Perform check to create a memorable performance that makes the audience forget the curtains. Failure means many guests are offended and demand refunds, and the amount of capital the building generates is halved for 1d6+1 days.

Visiting Master: a famous traveling bard has offered to teach your students for a week. For 7 days, you may trade Goods, Influence, and Labor on a 1-for-1 basis.

Table: Caster’s Tower Events
d% Event
01–05 Arcane breakthrough
06–10 Mysterious item
11–40 Desperate visitor
41–65 Roll on Table: Magic Shop Events
66–95 Catastrophic mishap
96–100 Dangerous surge

Arcane Breakthrough: Your hard work has resulted in the discovery of a new magic spell. Your apprentices have to work frantically to pen the spell, costing you 1d4 points of Labor and 1d6 points of Magic. There’s a 75% chance this creates an arcane scroll of a random low-level spell (roll 1d4 to determine the spell level), and a 25% chance it creates an arcane scroll of a random mid-level spell (roll 1d2+4 to determine the spell level).

Catastrophic Mishap: An accident in one of your lab rooms causes severe structural damage to your tower — blowing out an entire floor, sinking the building halfway into the ground, or causing things not bolted down to simply float away. There’s a 50% chance this event causes a fire (see Generic Building Events). Otherwise, the damage and aftereffects cost you 1d4 points of Influence, and the building gains the broken condition until you spend 2d6 points of Magic to repair it.

Dangerous Surge: Through some inexplicable conflux of celestial events, ley lines, and an unusual ingredient, your building creates more magic than you know what to do with. In addition to its normal capital, the building generates 1d3 points of Magic per day for 1d6 days. However, on each of these days, you must spend at least half of this extra Magic (converting it to gp or another form of capital does not count) or the building gains the broken condition, all unspent additional Magic created by this event dissipates, and any remaining days of additional Magic from this event are lost.

Desperate Visitor: a mysterious visitor arrives asking for magical help with a personal and time-sensitive matter. If you succeed at a DC 25 Knowledge (arcana) check, you discreetly deal with the problem; you gain 1d4 points of Influence, and there is a 10% chance that the visitor recommends you to someone with a similar problem and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. If you fail this check, you are unable to help the visitor, word spreads of your ineptitude, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Mysterious Item: a mysterious magic item is discovered on your doorstep, is unearthed by one of your employees, or is delivered to you by a desperate adventurer. If you succeed at a DC 30 Spellcraft check, you identify it as a random magic item worth 500 gp or less, though its unusual history might give it a higher value. Failing this check means you are unable to identify it, or you detect traces of curse magic; either way, you must sell it quickly to someone else for 1d10 × 10 gp before it causes you any trouble.

Table: Castle Events
d% Event
01–20 Grand feast
21–35 New servant
36–55 Inadequate defenses
56–75 Training drill
76–85 Offensive jester
86–100 Uprising

Grand Feast: Your latest gala, ball, banquet, festival, or similar event turned out smashingly. Visitors from all over made their way to your grand event, and you gain 1d6 points of Influence for throwing such a well-received party.

Inadequate Defenses: One of your Castle’s key defenses isn’t sound—be it the moat, the keep, a turret, or some other integral part. The building gains the broken condition until you spend 1d6 points each of Goods and Labor repairing it.

New Servant: One of the new workers in your Castle — such as a guard, castellan, or cook — is having a rough first day and causing all sorts of mayhem. You lose 1d2 points of Goods to the rookie’s mess. Taking the servant under your wing results in an additional loss of 1d2 points of Goods per day for 1d3 days (due to breakage and other mishaps), but earns you 1 point of Influence and 1d6 points of Labor at the end of the training period. If you fire the incompetent underling, you gain 1d6 points of Influence as word of your iron-fisted management spreads.

Offensive Jester: While enjoying the entertainments of your jester, your guests are dumbstruck at one of the clown’s more scurrilous performances, and you must make a difficult decision about what to do with this foul-mouthed but popular bard. If you make an example of the jester (through dismissal, imprisonment, or execution), you lose 1d6 Influence because of angry peers. If you laugh off the insult, you gain the respect of your servants and the common people, but lose 1 Influence and 1d3 points of Labor.

Training Drill: The guards and soldiers of your Castle need constant training in order to stay on top of their duties. Attempt a DC 25 Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Profession (soldier) check. Success means the building gains a +2 bonus on all checks for 7 days. Failure indicates that your troops have fallen behind on their drills. You lose 1d2 points of Labor as you retrain them to their former proficiency.

Uprising: Armed rabble — prisoners in the dungeons, angry peasants, or a tribe of primitive humanoids — plan to attack your Castle. You can bribe them to disperse by spending 1d6 points of Goods, but there is a 25% chance they come back 5d6 days later wanting more. If you convince them to calm down with a successful DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check, you gain 1d3 points of Influence for your willingness to speak to them. Failing this check means they damage your Castle, costing you 1d6+1 points of Goods and Labor, divided as you choose. You can instead use magic or violence to deal with the upstarts (either directly or through your guards), but you lose 1d3 points of Influence and 1d3 points of Labor as news of your actions spreads.

Table: Dance Hall Events
d% Event
01–25 Famous dancer
26–35 Heart’s desire
36–55 Ballroom magic
56–70 Sweaty pox
71–85 Fiendish skill
86–95 Accursed lounge
96–100 Wild night

Accursed Lounge: One of the lounges is rumored to be cursed, and it’s affecting business. While the curse persists (whether it is real or imagined), the building’s generated currency is reduced by half, but any day that it generates at least 3 points of Influence there is a 25% chance that it also generates 1 point of Magic. You may end this event by spending 2 points of Influence and 1 of Magic, or by casting bless, break enchantment, or remove curse on the room.

Ballroom Magic: An enthusiastic local spellcaster offers to use magic to temporarily enhance your employees’ appeal and skills. If you spend 1d2 points of Magic, the building gains a +10 bonus on checks to generate gp or Influence for the next 2d6 days.

Famous Dancer: A well-known dancer has heard of your Dance Hall and is making a guest appearance for a limited time! The dancer stays for 1d4 days. Each day the dancer stays, you gain 1d2 points of Influence. If any event causes you to lose Goods or Magic, the dancer leaves and you lose an amount of Labor equal to half the Influence you gained from the dancer’s presence.

Fiendish Skill: One of your best dancers is tainted by evil magic — he’s possessed, was replaced by a shapechanging evil outsider, or something similar — and is preying upon your customers. Spend 5 Magic or use appropriate spells to exorcise the evil presence. If not, you lose 1 point of Influence or Labor (your choice) each day, but the building gains a +10 bonus on checks to generate gp or Magic.

Heart’s Desire: A local noble wants to elope with one of your dancers. If you give permission for this, attempt a Diplomacy check and (whether you succeed or fail) multiply the result × 5 gp to determine your profits in terms of bribes and jewelry. If you refuse, you must succeed at a DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check to avoid losing 1d3 points of Influence and 1 point of Labor.

Sweaty Pox: Your employees are all developing fevers and unsightly sores, scaring away and possibly infecting customers. Until you spend 1d6 points of Goods, 1d6 points of Influence, or 1d3 points of Magic to eradicate this problem, your building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each Event phase that this pox persists, there is a 20% chance that your building also gets an infestation (see Table: Generic Building Events).

Wild Night: Overzealous patrons damage furnishings in a lounge or the main hall. The building takes a –10 penalty on checks to generate capital until repairs costing 1d3 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Labor are made.

Table: Guildhall Events
d% Event
01–25 Prosperity
26–35 Renovations
36–55 Increased taxes
56–70 Infighting
71–85 Rival guild
86–100 Unfair practices

Increased Taxes: New laws increase the tariffs placed on local guilds—or perhaps you are the victim of an overzealous tax collector with a grudge against you. Attempt a DC 20 Craft or Profession check appropriate to the nature of your guild. If you fail, the building takes a permanent –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each time you roll this event again, this penalty stacks (maximum –25). At any point you can spend 1d3 points of Goods or Influence to pay these taxes, bribe the tax collector, or find a loophole in the law, reducing the penalty by 5 (minimum 0).

Infighting: Guild politics have gotten out of hand, and it’s up to you to quell the increasingly heated arguments and even open brawls that are happening in the Guildhall. The infighting lasts 2d6 days. Attempt one DC 25 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Sense Motive check on each of these days. For each failure, you lose 1 point of Influence as you show you’re an ineffective leader. If you succeed 3 times, you regain control, the event ends, and you gain an amount of Influence equal to the number of days remaining.

Prosperity: Business is booming. For 1d6 days, the Guildhall gains a +5 bonus on its first check each day to generate capital.

Renovations: Because of shoddy workmanship, age, a curse, or bad luck, the Guildhall needs maintenance. The building has the broken condition until you spend 1d6 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Labor for the renovations. Once you renovate, there’s a 25% chance you discover a valuable item during the construction, such as a forgotten tome, rare trophy, or long-lost gemstone. You may keep or sell this item. If you sell it, you gain 1d6 × 20 gp.

Rival Guild: a rival guild has opened in the settlement, drawing potential members and customers away from yours. Treat this as a rivalry event (see Generic Building Events). Until the rivalry ends, the building takes a –10 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Unfair Practices: One of the guild members hasn’t been contributing her fair share—skimming off the top, not paying dues, doing work for a rival guild, or taking more than her fair share of the profits. You can spend 1d4 points of Influence to discipline this member or attempt a DC 25 Intimidate check to set her straight. If you succeed at this check, you frighten her into donating excess funds to the guild to make up for previous transgressions, earning you 1d6 points of Goods. Failing the check costs you an additional 1d4 points of Influence as other members realize they can get away with more.

Table: Herbalist Events
d% Event
01–10 Dangerous discovery
11–30 Roll on Table: Alchemist Events
31–55 Snake oil
56–70 Exhausting concoction
71–80 New intoxicant
81–100 Noxious fumes

Dangerous Discovery: While experimenting with a recipe, you accidentally create a dose of poison. Randomly select one poison that costs 500 gp or less per dose. You can keep this dose for your own use or sell it at full value. Note that selling poison might be illegal in the settlement.

Exhausting Concoction: Accidental exposure to a stimulating herbal treatment has given your workers insomnia, allowing them to increase their output. For 1d6 days, each day you can spend 1 point of Influence to push the workers, giving the building a +10 bonus on its first check that day to generate capital.

New Intoxicant: You discover a natural substance—perhaps a rare herb or a refined form of a common beverage—that creates a pleasant, intoxicating sensation. If you spend 1d4 points of Influence and succeed at a DC 20 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check, you convince the local authorities to allow you to sell it, and for 2d6 days the building gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. If you fail or don’t attempt the check, the substance is declared illegal, a threat to society, or immoral. If the substance is banned, you can sell it illegally for only a short while before the risk grows too great; for 2d4 days, the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. There is a 10% chance than an unscrupulous employee may continue selling this intoxicating substance on the side without your permission or knowledge (which may lead to complications with local authorities).

Noxious Fumes: The horrible stink created by one of your latest concoctions makes the workers ill. Attempt a DC 25 Craft (alchemy) or Profession (herbalist) check to create a counteragent before anyone has to take days off to recover. If you succeed, you end the event with no penalties. If you fail, you lose 2d4 points of Labor; each point of Magic you spend reduces the amount of Labor lost by 2.

Snake Oil: You’ve created an invigorating tonic that makes people feel better, though whether or not it has any actual curative effect is dubious. If you spend 1 point of Influence or Magic, you can attempt a DC 25 Bluff check to convince the locals to try your cure-all. If you succeed, the building gains a +15 bonus on its next check to generate capital. You can attempt this check every day after you roll this event, but the DC increases by 2 with each attempt. If you fail the check, the event ends, and you can no longer attempt these daily checks (at least, not until you roll this event again).

Table: House Events
d% Event
01–10 Buried relic
11–35 Roll on Table: Inn Events
36–55 Neighbor rivalry
56–65 Haunting
66–80 Fussy neighbor
81–95 Unstable foundation
96–100 Arson

Arson: Someone sets your House on fire to send you a message. Treat this as the fire event.

Buried Relic: You find an unusual object on your property — a gem, piece of jewelry, or magic item worth 300 gp or less. There’s a 5% chance that the item is cursed or in some way faulty. Each time you roll this event, the chance of a cursed item increases by 5% (maximum 30% chance).

Fussy Neighbor: A highly influential neighbor insists that you remodel some of your House’s rooms. Choose 1d3 random rooms in your House to renovate, and pay an amount of gp equal to 20% of the cost of those rooms. For every 2 points of Influence you own, the gp cost decreases by 5%; if this reduces the cost to 0, you don’t have to remodel. If you refuse to remodel, you lose 1d4 points of Influence.

Haunting: A supernatural presence enters your home. Roll d%; on a 01–20, the presence is harmful, on a 21–80, it’s mischievous, and on an 81–100 it’s helpful. A harmful presence increases capital attrition of 1 point of Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic per week, and has a 10% chance per night of attacking one overnight guest with a nightmare. A mischievous presence might bring bad luck (50%) or good luck (50%) to one roll for anyone who sleeps in your home; bad luck functions as if the subject were affected by the touch of chaos granted power from the Chaos domain, and good luck functions as if the subject were affected by the bit of luck granted power from the Luck domain. A helpful presence must be appeased once every 7 days with a successful DC 15 Diplomacy check. If you succeed at the check, you also gain 1 point of Influence or Labor (your choice). If you fail, the presence leaves on its own. Getting rid of any variety of supernatural presence requires appropriate spells or spending 2d6 points of Magic.

Neighbor Rivalry: You have a disagreement with a neighbor. Attempt a DC 15 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. If you succeed, the event ends. If you fail, you lose 1 point of Influence and must attempt another check each day, increasing the DC by 2 each time. At any time you can bury the hatchet and spend Goods or Labor (1 + 1 for each time you failed the check to end this event) to end the event by doing something nice for the neighbor.

Unstable Foundation: The foundation of your House is sinking. The building gains the broken condition, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence due to the embarrassment. It costs 1d2 points of Goods and 1d6 points of Labor to bolster the foundation and remove the broken condition.

Table: Inn Events
d% Event
01–15 Talk of the town
16–30 Food shortage
31–55 Roll on Table: Tavern Events
56–75 Strange guest
76–95 Theft
96–100 Violence

Food Shortage: Business is booming, but your food and drink stores are depleted by this increased demand. You lose 1d4 points of Goods. If you still have Goods left after paying this cost, you gain 1 point of Influence; otherwise, you lose 1 point of Influence and the building takes a –5 penalty on its next 1d6 checks to generate capital.

Strange Guest: When a rapping at the front door awakes you from your slumber one stormy night, you find a shadowy, mysterious stranger on your Inn’s stoop. There’s a 50% chance this guest is just a wandering traveler seeking sanctuary from the foul weather, a 25% chance the guest brought you a gift in return for refuge (earning you your choice of 1d4 points of Goods or Influence), and a 25% chance the guest has violent intentions (in which case the GM should create a combat encounter suitable for your level).

Talk of the Town: Your Inn is a beacon of safety and warmth, and the business you’ve been doing has earned you a growing reputation in the surrounding settlements. If you succeed at a DC 25 Diplomacy or Perform check, you steer the rumors favorably to increase business, and for 2d6 days, the building gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Theft: Your last guests stole property — items crucial to running the Inn. Until you pay 2d20 gp to replace these items, the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Alternatively, the GM may allow you to track down the thieves and reclaim your stolen property as an adventure encounter.

Violence: There is a 60% chance that this is just a simple brawl in the common room, and a 40% chance that someone has attempted actual harm against your employees or guests. If it is a simple brawl, you can break it up with a successful DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check or by spending 1 point of Goods on the quarrelers. If it is a violent attack and you’re present when it occurs, you can attempt to intercede (the GM should determine an appropriate combat encounter). Whether or not the violent attack is successful, the perpetrator must be dealt with. If you do nothing at all, you lose 1d4 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor as you lose frightened customers and employees. If you want the local authorities to take care of it, attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. Success means an investigation and arrest occur without any negative repercussions. Failure means you lose 1d4 points of Influence and 1 point of Labor. If you find and punish the perpetrator yourself (or hire someone to do so), you gain 1d4 points of Influence.

Table: Library Events
d% Event
01–30 Pile of books
31–45 Famous writer
46–50 Strange visitor
51–55 Rare find
56–70 Fire
71–75 Bookworm infestation
76–100 Stolen books

Bookworm Infestation: Your Library has become infested with the bane of the printed page—bookworms. You lose 1 point each of Goods and Magic. Proceed as if this were the infestation event from the Generic Building Events section, except that you lose 1 point each of Goods and Magic each day the infestation persists.

Famous Writer: A famous writer wants to use your Library for research for 2d6 days. Each day the writer remains, you gain 1 point of Influence. The writer leaves early if any event causes you to lose Goods or Magic. If the writer leaves early, you must succeed at a DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check to avoid losing twice the amount of Influence you gained from the visiting writer because of negative rumors.

Fire: A fire breaks out. See the fire event in Generic Building Events. This is always a major fire.

Pile of Books: Your Library has the chance to acquire a large number of books. These could come from an estate sale, ally, or adventurers who found old tomes in a dungeon. Attempt a DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check. On a success, the owner donates the books; on a failure, you may purchase them by paying 100 gp for each point by which you failed the check. If you attain the books either way, you gain 1d2 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Magic.

Rare Find: Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge check (with your choice of knowledge skill). If you succeed, you discover a rare book owned by someone who doesn’t understand its significance. You may either purchase the book for 2d6 gp to gain 1d4 points of Magic and 1d2 points of Influence, or inform the book’s owner of the truth to instead gain 2d6 points of Influence. If you buy the book, there’s a 5% chance it contains a randomly determined magic scroll.

Stolen Books: Thieves have stolen several of your most important books! The Library gains the broken condition until it is repaired or the stolen books are recovered (in which case the GM should create an encounter suitable for your level to represent the thieves).

Strange Visitor: A strange visitor comes to your Library in search of books that you fear contain dangerous knowledge. You can turn him away with a successful DC 25 Diplomacy or Intimidate check, but doing so could anger him — 5% of the time, such strange visitors are powerful creatures in disguise who resort to violence to get what they want. Allowing the visitor to peruse your Library’s resources might have unfortunate future repercussions, at the GM’s discretion.

Table: Magic Shop Events
d% Event
01–25 Clueless adventurer
26–30 Roll on Table: Shop Events
31–35 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
36–50 Unexpected magic
51–70 Burglary
71–100 Concerned citizens

Burglary: Thieves have attempted to break into your shop to steal your magic. You can immediately spend 1d6 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Perception or Spellcraft check. On a success, your building’s defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. On a failure, you lose 1d4 points of Goods and 2d4 points of Magic.

Clueless Adventurer: An adventurer comes to the shop seeking to sell a magic item that she has misidentified or doesn’t understand the true nature of. Most of the time, this item is relatively minor (worth less than 1,000 gp), but 10% of the time it’s a randomly determined item of a greater value (up to 4,000 gp). The adventurer offers to sell the item to you for half of what she thinks its actual value is (for example, if she thinks a potion of cure serious wounds is actually a potion of cure moderate wounds, she asks for 150 gp instead of 375 gp). If you inform the adventurer of the item’s actual abilities and value before buying it (and adjust your buying price accordingly), word of your honesty gets around and you gain 2d6 points of Influence. There is a 50% chance the informed adventurer decides to keep the item and a 50% chance she decides to sell it to you anyway at your offered buying price.

Concerned Citizens: Locals often misunderstand magic, and when strange things or unfortunate accidents occur, they’re quick to blame the local Magic Shop. The newest spate of dead cattle, missing children, strange lights in the sky, or ghost sightings might or might not be magical in nature, but unless you can assuage citizens’ concerns with a successful DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check, you lose 2d6 points of Influence.

Unexpected Magic: Magic can be unpredictable, especially when many magic items are stored in close proximity. Through the unpredictable results of overlapping and interacting magic auras, or perhaps as a result of a damaged magic item or leaking potion, a strange magical event occurs. The event is minor 75% of the time, causing flashing lights, strange smells, or unusual sounds. Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge (arcana) check in this case. On a success, you learn something useful about how to store magic and gain 1 point of Magic. The other 25% of the time, the interaction is dangerous—a sudden explosion of fire, the accidental animation of an object, the summoning of a hungry monster, and so on. These events should be tailored by the GM, but should be comparable in power to a trap or monster encounter of your level.

Table: Magical Academy Events
d% Event
01–10 Unexpected grant
11–20 Student discovery
21–40 Roll on Table: Military Academy Events
41–45 Bitter student
46–70 Magical waste
71–80 Experiment amok
81–90 Explosion
91–100 Hazing gone wrong

Bitter Student: Whether the pupil is dissatisfied with a grade or was expelled and now holds a grudge, this student has it in for your academy. The bitter student is adept at hiding out—he could be anyone! Until you expose the bitter student, each time you’d roll an event for this building, you must roll twice, and the GM chooses the worse of the two results. When you roll this event, immediately roll twice on the Generic Building Events table, and the GM chooses which of the two possible events occurs. You can try to find and expose the student once per day by attempting a DC 30 Perception check. The DC lowers by 1 for each prior failure as you get closer to identifying the culprit. The bitter student is exposed automatically if you reroll this event as either of your two rolls.

Experiment Amok: a student’s experiment has broken loose! This is a monster chosen by the GM, with a CR equal to your average party level—usually a construct, outsider, or even an undead, though your favored type of magic may mean other kinds of creatures are possible. You must defeat the monster in combat (your students flee the creature, but other PCs may help you defeat it if they are present). At the end of each combat round the monster remains alive, its rampage deals damage to the building, costing 1 point of Goods, Magic, or Labor (chosen randomly each time).

Explosion: Treat this as the explosion event for the Alchemist building.

Hazing Gone Wrong: One of your students is the victim of a cruel prank at the hands of the other students. The hazing event is shameful and dangerous, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence as the community learns of it. You must succeed at a DC 20 Heal or Spellcraft check to help the student. If you fail the check, the student dies or is permanently maimed, and you lose another 2d6 points of Influence, 1d6 points of Labor, and 1d3 points of Magic in dealing with the repercussions of the hazing.

Student Discovery: A student makes an unexpected discovery. You gain 1d3 points of Magic.

Magical Waste: A student ruins some equipment or wastes some magic. You lose 1d3 points of Magic.

Unexpected Grant: Your academy has attracted the right kind of attention. You gain 2d4 points of Goods, and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Table: Menagerie Events
d% Event
01–20 Exotic donation
21–55 Festival
56–60 Contagion
61–75 Escaped animal
76–90 Lost visitor
91–100 Unruly druid

Contagion: The creatures in your Menagerie suffer from a mysterious malady. Treat this as the sickness event from Generic Building Events, and your building gains the broken condition until the sickness is ended.

Escaped Animal: One of your exhibits escapes its cage. If you keep track of specific creatures, determine the escaped creature randomly. Attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal, Perception, Survival, or wild empathy check (or if the escaped creature is intelligent, a Bluff or Diplomacy check) to find the creature and safely return it to its cage. If you fail, you lose 1d6 points of Influence and 1d4 points of Labor, and the building generates no capital that day.

Exotic Donation: An eccentric aristocrat, adventurer, explorer, or other individual delivers an unusual creature to add to your exhibit. The type of creature is determined by the GM—you might need to expend additional resources (typically 1d6 points of Goods and 1d3 points of Labor) or craft a special room to house particularly unusual creatures. If you take the creature, you gain 2d6 points of Influence.

Festival: The settlement or an important person wants to use your Menagerie as the site for an upcoming festival. Make a note of your current Influence. Roll 2d6 to determine how many days will pass until the Festival takes place. If on the day of the Festival your Influence is lower than it was on the day of the request, the Festival is cancelled and you lose an additional 1d6 points of Influence. Otherwise, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal or Perform check. If you succeed, your Menagerie gets a +20 bonus on its first check to generate capital that day.

Lost Visitor: a visitor becomes lost. Attempt a DC 20 Perception check. If you succeed, you find the lost person and the event ends with no drawbacks. If you fail this check, the visitor has a 50% chance of being wounded or killed—if this occurs, you lose 1d6 points of Influence. If the lost visitor isn’t wounded or killed, you must attempt the Perception check again each hour with a cumulative +2 bonus; repeat until you find the missing visitor or the visitor is wounded or killed.

Unruly Druid: An unruly druid embarks on a crusade against your Menagerie. The druid continues to harass your building until you succeed at a DC 30 Diplomacy or Knowledge (nature) check to mollify her, or until you detain or defeat her in combat. While the druid is acting against your Menagerie, all checks related to the building that you make take a –5 penalty.

Table: Military Academy Events
d% Event
01–10 Famous alumnus
11–20 Unexpected grant
21–45 Competition
46–60 Scandal
61–65 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
66–80 Spoiled student
81–100 Duel

Competition: Several teachers and classes organize an impromptu competition between students. This competition could be a classic tournament, a mock battle, a military recreation, or even a series of gladiatorial bloodsports. If you spend 1d3 points of Goods to outfit the participants with particularly flashy equipment, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and your building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Duel: Two students or teachers have a dispute that must be settled with a duel to the death. You can prevent the duel by spending 1d4 points of Influence or succeeding at a DC 25 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. Otherwise, you lose 1 point of Labor and 1d2 points of Influence.

Famous Alumnus: An old veteran or beloved hero who either attended your academy or is otherwise associated with its traditions comes to visit. The visit lasts 2d6 days, during which you gain 1 point of Influence each day. The visitor demands a significant amount of your personal time. If you don’t spend the majority of your time each day wining and dining your visitor, she loses interest and leaves, costing you 2d6 points of Influence.

Scandal: Some sort of scandal strikes your academy — an affair between a teacher and a student, a destructive prank or dangerous hazing, a student brawling with a noble’s son, or the like. The scandal’s repercussions last 2d4 days. During that period, it’s difficult for anyone at the academy to concentrate, the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence each day. Once per day, you can attempt to repair the damage to your reputation and end the event with a successful DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Failure extends the duration of the scandal’s fallout by another 1d4 days.

Spoiled Student: a student accustomed to an easier life demands special treatment. If you don’t provide it by spending 1d4 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence, the student threatens to quit the academy. Attempt a DC 25 Intimidate check. If you fail, the student and several toadies leave, costing you 2d6 points of Labor. If you succeed, only the student leaves, costing you 1d4 points of Labor. If you beat the DC of this check by 10 or more, the student stays (this costs you no Labor) and works hard; this impresses the student’s parents, who praise your academy, and earns you 1d6 points of Influence.

Unexpected Grant: See the event of the same name in the Magical Academy Events section.

Table: Monastery Events
d% Event
01–05 Visiting relic
06–25 Productive day
26–35 Traveling priest
36–60 Holy day
61–75 Inquisitor
76–85 Monster attack
86–95 Scandal
96–100 Roll on Table: Temple Events

Holy Day: Today is a holy day — this could be a minor day of worship or a significant event. If your monastery is philosophical rather than religious, this might be a birthday or the anniversary of a significant historical event. Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge (history) or Knowledge (religion) check. If you succeed, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and your Monastery gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Inquisitor: An inquisitor of your faith arrives at your Monastery, following up on rumors that there are heretics, blasphemers, or worse hidden within. She stays at your Monastery for 2d4 days. Each day, you must attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy or Knowledge (religion) check to appease the Inquisitor and avoid losing 1d2 points of Influence. If your Monastery is affected by a scandal event while the Inquisitor is present, she immediately halts the scandal but you lose 1d6 points of Labor.

Monster Attack: Something dangerous (with a total CR equal to your character level + 1) attacks your Monastery — a dangerous monster from the wilds, tribe of savage humanoids, or rival cult. The initial attack causes you to lose 1d6 points of Goods, Labor, and Magic (split however you wish). Every 1d6 days, the antagonists return to attack again, costing you capital again until they’re defeated. If you don’t defeat the menace yourself, you can hire adventurers to do so at a cost equal to your character level × 1,000 gp.

Productive Day: The Monastery is particularly productive today. The building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Scandal: This is the same as the scandal event from Military Academy Events, except a Monastery scandal lasts for 2d6 days. You can attempt to repair the reputation damage from a Monastery scandal with a DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Knowledge (religion) check.

Traveling Priest: A traveling priest of your faith arrives at the Monastery. She stays for 1d6 days, during which the Monastery gains a +4 bonus on all checks (but only on one check to generate capital per day). If you ever lose any Labor while the traveling priest is visiting, she reduces the amount of Labor lost by 1d4 (minimum of 0).

Visiting Relic: Your Monastery has been selected as the resting place for a traveling reliquary for 1d4 days. You gain 1d4 points of Influence each day the relic is housed in your Monastery.

Table: Shop Events
d% Event
01–30 Busy day
31–45 Slow day
46–60 Shoplifter
61–75 Embezzler
76–90 Burglary
91–95 Protection racket
96–100 Robbery

Burglary: Thieves have attempted to break into your Shop to steal your items. You can immediately spend 1d6 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Perception check. On a success, your building’s defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. On a failure, you lose 1d4 points of Goods. The GM may allow you to pursue or track down the thieves as an adventure hook.

Busy Day: For whatever reason, your Shop is particularly busy today. If you spend the day at the Shop helping customers, the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Embezzler: One of your employees is skimming your profits. You can attempt a DC 25 Perception or Sense Motive check to catch the employee in the act. If you catch and fire the employee, you lose 1 point of Labor. If you don’t catch the employee, you lose 1 point of Influence and the building’s next check to generate capital takes a –10 penalty. The dishonest employee waits 1d6 days before acting again. You can attempt a new Perception or Sense Motive check each time the embezzler acts, with the DC decreasing by 1 each time until you catch the employee as he becomes more brazen. If for some reason you catch the employee and don’t fire him, he waits 2d6 days to embezzle again unless you somehow force him to stop.

Protection Racket: Thugs attempt to extort money from your Shop for “protection.” You can pay their demand (an amount equal to the building’s maximum possible gp earned in a day) or attempt to scare them off with a DC 25 Intimidate check. If you fail to run them off, they steal an amount of merchandise and cash equal to twice their initial demand plus 1d4 points of Goods.

Robbery: Someone has targeted your store or employees for a quick robbery. There is a 75% chance this is just a crime of opportunity and a 25% chance that this is a planned attack on your Shop. Treat the event as the criminal activity event from Generic Building Events; if it is a planned attack, increase the Influence needed to prevent the attack to 2d6, the Intimidate DC to 25, and the cost of the robbery to 2d6 points of Goods.

Shoplifter: a customer tries to walk out of your Shop with a valuable item. Attempt a DC 20 Perception check. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods.

Slow Day: For some reason, no one’s coming to the Shop today. If you don’t spend the day at the Shop, it earns no capital for the day.

Table: Smithy Events
d% Event
01–15 Special request
16–20 Unforeseen masterwork
21–25 Exotic metal
26–30 Valuable ore
31–35 Roll on Table: Shop Events
36–50 Forge waste
51–65 Supply problems
66–80 Forced commission
81–100 Deadly accident

Deadly Accident: This is the same as the deadly accident event from Generic Building Events, except that there is also a 25% chance that the accident starts a fire (as the fire event in same section).

Exotic Metal: A supplier offers to sell you a small amount of cold iron, mithral, or adamantine (up to 1,000 gp worth) at a 20% discount. You may spend Goods, Magic, or gp to pay for this metal.

Forced Commission: A government official requires a specific commission, but refuses to pay for the service, claiming it is your duty to support the government. If you comply with this demand, completing the work takes 1d4 days, and the building generates no income for that period of time. If you resist, the official goes elsewhere, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Forge Waste: An employee ruins some equipment or refined metal. Attempt a DC 30 Craft check appropriate to your Smithy. If you succeed, you are able to salvage much of the metal and only lose 1 point of Goods. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods.

Special Request: A famous hero, noble, military commander, or similar notable comes to your Smithy with a special request for an unusual or masterwork item—perhaps manacles, a cage, exotic barding, or a replacement piece for an iron golem. For 1d4 days, as payments come in for the request, your building gains a +20bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. At the end of this period, attempt a DC 30 Craft check of the appropriate type. On a success, your Smithy has done so well on the request that the customer spreads the word of your skill and you gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Supply Problems: Your suppliers have a problem—a road is washed out, bandits are thick in the wilds, or an important caravan has been attacked by a monster. In any event, your necessary supplies are running low. You lose 1d3 points of Goods, and for 1d4 days this building takes a –5 penalty on its checks to generates capital.

Unforeseen Masterwork: Normally, it takes focus, time, and skill to forge a masterwork object, but by chance one of your workers manages to produce one accidentally. You gain 1d10 × 10 gp or 1d10 points of Goods (your choice) for the sale of this item.

Valuable Ore: Your suppliers send a particularly fine shipment of iron ore or steel bars. You gain 1d4 points of Goods. There’s a 5% chance that the supplier also included precious metals or gemstones worth 5d20 gp by mistake. If you give these back to the supplier instead of keeping them, you gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Table: Stable Events
d% Event
01–15 Famous visitor
16–30 Emergency request
31–45 Crazed horse
46–65 Predators
66–80 Runaway
81–95 Horse thieves
96–100 Stable fire

Crazed Horse: One of the horses in your Stable goes berserk—perhaps it smells a predator, it dislikes another horse, or someone tried to steal it and fled. You must attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal, Ride, or wild empathy check to calm the horse down. If you fail, the horse runs amok, costing you 1d3 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Influence, and there’s a 25% chance of having an immediate runaway event (see below).

Emergency Request: A desperate soldier, messenger, or traveler comes to you with an emergency request—she needs to borrow one or several of the horses in your Stable. If you agree to the request, you gain 1d6 points of Influence but will be short on horses for 2d4 days, during which time your building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. If you ignore the request, the event ends with no penalty or cost to you.

Famous Visitor: A well-known ranger, a messenger for a king, or someone of equal import stables a mount in your building. If you succeed at a DC 20 Handle Animal check, you impress the visitor enough to gain 1d4 points of Influence as she spreads the word of the quality of your stabling. If you roll a 4 on the 1d4 roll, you instead gain 3 points of Influence and 1 point of Magic.

Horse Thieves: Thieves attempt to steal some of your horses. You can immediately spend 1d4 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Perception check. If you succeed, your building’s defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. If you fail, you lose 1d4 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence. The GM may allow you to pursue or track down the thieves as an adventure hook.

Predators: Wild animals or monsters have snuck into your Stable. This could be something as minor as a few giant rats or a wild dog, or as major as a wyvern or young dragon (the GM chooses the creature). You must defend your Stable against the predators in combat or you lose 1d6 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence.

Runaway: One or more horses in your Stable wander off or run away. Attempt a DC 25 Perception or Survival check to track the horses down. If you fail, you lose 1d6 points of Influence and for the next 1d4 days this building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Stable Fire: Treat this as the fire event from the Generic Building Events section. If it is a minor fire, there is also a 50% chance that your Stable also has a crazed horse event.

Table: Tavern Events
d% Event
01–15 Drinking contest
16–30 Shenanigans
31–50 Bar brawl
51–65 Rousing performance
66–75 Protection racket
76–85 Notorious visitor
86–100 Taproom trouble

Bar Brawl: One insult against someone’s lineage or beard or beauty, and the next thing you know, there’s a fight! Word of the brawl helps spread your Tavern’s infamy—you gain 1d4 points of Influence. Attempt a DC 20 Intimidate check. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Labor, and Magic (divided as the GM chooses) because of damage to your building.

Drinking Contest: Two patrons challenge each other to a drinking contest. They demand the good stuff in order to make the contest count. Your building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. There is a 25% chance this event happens again the next day.

Notorious Visitor: A well-known criminal, evil adventurer, or known local troublemaker visits your Tavern with his cronies. There’s a 50% chance the visitor starts a bar brawl (as the event above). Otherwise, his presence causes regulars to leave, halving the capital the building generates during the next Income phase. At the GM’s discretion, this event could lead to more difficulties with the visitor if he feels you treat him poorly.

Protection Racket: This is the same as the protection racket event from the Shop Events section.

Rousing Performance: A talented bard gives a rousing performance at your Tavern, delighting your customers. You gain 1d3 points of Influence, your building gains a +20bonus on its next check to generate capital, and there’s a 25% chance the bard’s performance triggers a shenanigans event (see below).

Shenanigans: In some businesses shenanigans would be considered a scandal, but in a Tavern these ribald activities are a boon. Perhaps someone important met with a prostitute, or maybe someone’s spouse got a little friendly with an employee. Attempt a Bluff or Diplomacy check (DC equals 20 + 1d6). If you succeed, you treat the incident with the proper discretion; you gain 1d4 points of Influence and someone involved gives you a tip of 1d20 gp for your tact. If you fail, there are no negative repercussions for you or your business.

Taproom Trouble: Something’s gone bad in the kitchen. Foul beer, bad fish, spoiled stew — whatever the cause is, it’s making the customers sick. You can avoid any negative repercussions by spending 1d2 points of Magic on potions or medicinal elixirs or succeeding at a DC 20 Heal check. Otherwise, bad word of mouth costs you 2d6 points of Influence, and for the next 2d6 days the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Table: Temple Events
d% Event
01 Major miracle
02–05 Sacred ritual
06–25 Ceremony request
26–35 Important visitor
36–75 Healing request
76–80 Minor miracle
81–95 Scandal
96–100 Roll on Table: Monastery Events

Ceremony Request: A local person with a good reputation or high social rank has requested a special ceremony from your Temple — a wedding, funeral, blessing for a new business venture, or other service chosen by the GM. Attempt a DC 20 Knowledge (religion) check. If you succeed, the ceremony is particularly well received and you gain 1d3 points of Influence and 2d20 gp in donations.

Healing Request: Someone has been hurt, has fallen ill, or is otherwise in need of magical healing. You can perform the healing yourself by expending 1d4 spell levels worth of healing spells, or by spending 1d6 points of Magic. If you perform the healing for free, you gain 2d4 points of Influence. If you charge for the healing, your building gains a +20 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Important Visitor: A cleric, inquisitor, paladin, or other notable holy person associated with your faith or an allied faith visits your Temple. If you succeed at a DC 20 Diplomacy check, the visitor stays 1d8 days. Each day the visitor remains, you gain 1 point of Influence and the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Major Miracle: a major miracle occurs at your Temple or to one of its faithful, such as recovering from a terminal illness, permanent blindness, or another debilitating affliction. You gain 2d4 points of Influence, and for 1d6 days you and all allies who worship your deity gain a +2 sacred bonus on Fortitude and Will saving throws. You may also tread this as a sacred ritual event.

Minor Miracle: a minor miracle occurs at your Temple or to one of its faithful in the form of a vision, good omen, unexpected recovery from sickness, or the like. You gain 1d4 points of Influence, and for 1d4 days you and all allies who worship your deity gain a +2 sacred bonus on Fortitude or Will saving throws (choose one).

Sacred Ritual: a ritual sacred to your faith is performed today at your Temple. Spend 2d4 points of Magic and attempt a DC 20 Knowledge (religion) check—if you succeed, faith runs high and you can choose one of the following effects to persist for 1d6 days: the building gains a +10 bonus on all checks (but only one check to generate capital per day), you gain a +2 bonus on one type of skill check, or you may prepare an additional domain spell of your highest domain spell level each day.

Scandal: This is the same as the scandal event for a Monastery, except a Temple scandal lasts for 1d8 days. There’s a 10% chance the scandal involves the influence of a rival faith, in which case you gain a rivalry as well (see Generic Building Events).

Table: Theater Events
d% Event
01–10 Rave reviews
11–25 Full house
26–35 Visiting troupe
36–55 Shenanigans
56–70 Poor performance
71–90 Prima donna
91–95 Cursed play
96–100 House fire

Cursed Play: Something has cursed your Theater or its current production. Perhaps an actor quoted a line from an unlucky play, or the script has the power to drive people mad. Attempt a DC 25 Perform check each day. If you fail, the Theater generates no capital that day. If you succeed, the curse and the event end.

Full House: Your Theater is packed—an excellent opportunity to impress people. You gain a +20 bonus on the building’s next check to generate capital. Attempt a DC 25 Perform check. If you succeed, word of the performance spreads and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. If you fail, there’s a 50% chance that a poor performance event occurs.

House Fire: Treat this as a fire event from the Generic Building Events section, except there is a 50% chance of a minor fire and a 50% chance of a major fire. Increase any lost capital from the event by 50%.

Poor Performance: Everyone has off nights, but your entire cast is missing cues and flubbing lines. You lose 2d4 points of Influence from bad reviews and 1d3 points of Labor from performers who quit out of shame.

Prima Donna: One of your performers is particularly temperamental today. You can assuage the performer’s ego with a DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Otherwise, the performer demands last-minute changes and makes ridiculous demands of the support staff. You lose 1d4 points of Goods and take a –5 penalty on all checks relating to this building for 1d6 days.

Rave Reviews: Your Theater has done well, and great reviews pour in. You gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Shenanigans: This event is similar to the shenanigans event from the Tavern Events section, though those involved in Theater shenanigans tend to be wealthier and more prominent. If you succeed at a DC 30 Bluff or Diplomacy check, you treat the incident with the proper discretion — you gain 1d6 points of Influence and someone involved gives you a tip of 10d10 gp for your tact.

Visiting Troupe: A group of traveling players asks to perform at your Theater. On the first day after this event, the players require full access to your Theater. Since you can’t be open to the public, the building generates no capital that day. The troupe remains for 1d4 days, and on those days you gain a +20 bonus on the building’s first check to generate capital each day. If the troupe is present when an event at the Theater makes you lose Labor, the troupe leaves early.

Organization Events

Unlike with buildings, there is no generic organization event table.

Table: Cabal Events
d% Event
01–05 Discovery
06–20 Arcane flux
21–30 Work opportunity
31–50 Portent
51–60 Roll on Table: Caster’s Tower Events
61–75 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
76–90 Familiar scraps
91–100 Image problem

Arcane Flux: An experimental ritual performed by the Cabal has granted you additional power. Roll 1d4; you gain a bonus arcane spell slot of that spell level (as if from a high ability score, up to a maximum of the highest-level arcane spell slot you can cast) for 24 hours.

Discovery: a member of your Cabal has produced some unexpected results. Roll d%. On a result of 01–75, the Cabal creates 1d6 random 1st-level arcane scrolls (add +1 scroll if you have the Scribe Scroll feat). On a result of 76–100, the Cabal creates 1d3 random 1st-level arcane potions (add +1 potion if you have the Brew Potion feat). You may keep these potions or sell them for full value.

Familiar Scraps: Several familiars belonging to members of your Cabal are causing problems with each other or with local animals. You must succeed at a DC 25 Diplomacy, Handle Animal, or Knowledge (arcana) check, or spend 1d4 points of Goods and Influence (divided as you see fit) to calm things down.

Image Problem: An influential person, such as a conservative noble, leader of a rival organization, or professor at a local academy tries to discredit your organization. Attempt a Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Knowledge (arcana) check opposed by this person’s Bluff, Intimidate, or Knowledge (arcana) check (1d20 + 5 if the GM doesn’t have a specific person in mind). If you succeed, you weather the bad comments and the event ends with no negative repercussions. If you succeed by at least 5, you increase your acclaim, gaining 1 point of Influence or Labor. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic (divided as you see fit) because of vandalism or members leaving out of fear.

Portent: a cabalist discovers an upcoming alignment of magical forces, increasing the cabal’s productivity. For 1d3 days, the organization gains a +10 bonus on its first check each day to generate Goods, Influence, or Magic.

Work Opportunity: a noble, merchant, or other patron hires your Cabal to assist with magical preparations for a ritual or festival. For 1d6 days, the organization gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. If you rolled a 6 for the number of days, there’s a 20% chance this causes a discovery event as described above.

Table: Cult Events
d% Event
01–05 Divine flux
06–20 Portent
21–45 Popular ritual
46–60 Roll on Table: Temple Events
61–75 Image problem
76–90 Apostate
91–95 Blasphemy
96–100 Schism

Apostate: a member of your Cult leaves and badmouths you to outsiders. For 1d6 days, the organization takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. If you rolled a 6 for the number of days, there’s a 50% chance the end of this event causes an image problem event as described below. Silencing the apostate (through threats, violence, or bribes worth 1d6 points of Goods or Influence) ends this penalty early.

Blasphemy: Someone in your Cult has broken a serious taboo. All divine casters in the Cult treat their caster level as 1 lower than normal for 1d3 days.

Divine Flux: Treat this as an arcane flux event on the Cabal Events table, except the bonus spell slot is divine instead of arcane.

Image Problem: An influential person, such as a conservative noble or leader of a rival church, attempts to discredit your organization. Attempt a Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check opposed by this person’s Bluff or Intimidate check (1d20 + 5 if the GM doesn’t have a specific person in mind). Success means you weather these attempts and the event ends with no negative repercussions. If you win by at least 5, you increase your fame, gaining your choice of 1 point of Influence or Labor. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Influence, and Labor (divided as you see fit) because of vandalism or members leaving out of fear.

Popular Ritual: One of your unusual customs, such as frequent use of hallucinogens or naked dancing, increases the Cult’s popularity. For 1d8 days, the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate Influence or Labor each day. If you rolled an 8 for the number of days, there’s a 50% chance the end of this event causes an image problem event as described above.

Portent: One of your members has a vision or interprets something as a religious sign, increasing religious fervor among the other followers. Choose Goods, Influence, or Labor. For 2d6 days, the Cult gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate that type of capital each day.

Schism: A popular member of your Cult tries to steal some of your people and create her own Cult. Attempt a Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Knowledge (religion) check against a DC equal to 20 + the number of teams in the organization. If you succeed, treat this as an apostate event as described above. If you fail by less than 5, you lose 1d2 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor. If you fail by 5 or more, you lose one team for every 5 full points by which you failed the DC. These lost teams go with the apostate.

Table: Mercenary Company Events
d% Event
01–15 Impressive results
16–25 Windfall
26–50 Brawl
51–70 Rivalry
71–80 Scandal
81–85 Duel
86–95 Schism
96–100 Mutiny

Brawl: This functions like the bar brawl in Tavern Events, except you may attempt a Profession (soldier) check instead of an Intimidate check, and a failed check causes a loss of Influence and Labor.

Duel: This functions like the duel event from the Military Academy Events section, except you may attempt a Profession (soldier) check instead of a Diplomacy or Intimidate check.

Impressive Results: Your mercenaries perform admirably, eliminating a problem quickly or defeating a more powerful opponent with ease. You gain 1d4 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor, and for 1d6 days the organization gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Mutiny: A member tries to take over the group, either by challenging you to a fight or by an underhanded method like attacking you while you sleep. You may handle this as a combat encounter or attempt a DC 25 Bluff, Intimidate, or Profession (soldier) check. If you succeed, the instigator leaves and you lose 1 point of Labor but gain 1d2 points of Influence. If you fail, you lose control of the Mercenary Company as if from business attrition.

Rivalry: Another mercenary group is stealing jobs from your organization. Treat this as the rivalry event from Generic Building Events, except you can also end the rivalry and gain 1d4 points of Influence by beating the leader in a duel (as the duel Military Academy event, but not necessarily to the death).

Scandal: Some sort of scandal strikes your company — a member is accused of murder or one of your teams injures locals in a bar fight. For 2d4 days you lose 1d2 points of Influence each day and the organization takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Once per day, you can attempt to repair the damage to your reputation and end the event with a DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Failure extends the duration of the scandal’s fallout by another 1d4 days.

Schism: This functions as the schism from the Cult Events section, except that the skills you can use to attempt to end it are Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Profession (soldier), and that succeeding at the check means you lose 1 point of Labor and the event ends.

Windfall: Your organization is rewarded handsomely for its recent efforts, either with payment from a grateful employer or rich spoils from looting an enemy. You gain 1d10 × 10 gp, 1d6 points of Goods, and 1 point of Magic.

Table: Thieves’ Guild Events
d% Event
01–10 Big Heist
11–30 Crime Spree
31–45 Rivalry
46–60 Crackdown
61–70 Entrapment
71–90 Meddling Adventurers
91–100 Mutiny

Big Heist: You have the opportunity to take on a risky but profitable job. If you accept, attempt a DC 30 Disable Device, Sleight of Hand, or Stealth check. If you succeed, the guild gains a +20 bonus on its next check to generate capital and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. If you fail, the guild automatically rolls a 1 on all checks to generate capital for 1 day, and you lose 1 point of Influence. If you fail by 10 or more, there’s a 25% chance that a team involved in the heist is captured (treat this as the entrapment event).

Crackdown: Local authorities are going out of their way to stifle crime. For 1d6 days, your guild takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital, and if you fail a DC 20 Stealth check by 10 or more, one of your teams is captured (as the entrapment event described below).

Crime Spree: Lady Luck has her eye on the settlement’s criminals. For 1d4 days, your guild gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. Each of these days you use the guild to generate capital, there’s 10% chance you have to deal with a meddling adventurers event as described below.

Entrapment: A lucrative job turns out to be a plot by the city guard to catch thieves, and one of your teams is arrested. You must spend 5 points of Influence or 1d10 × 5 gp to get the team out of jail; if you don’t, the team members are imprisoned, or (depending on the local laws against thievery) are executed 1d10 days later. Either result costs you the entire team and 1d6 points of Influence for letting it happen. Alternatively, you can attempt to break the team out of jail—the GM should create a combat encounter or short adventure if you try this solution.

Meddling Adventurers: Unusually competent do-gooders sniff around your territory and spar with your teams. You must succeed at a DC 25 Disable Device, Sleight of Hand, or Stealth check or lose 1d6 points of Goods because of their activities. If you succeed by 10 or more, you gain 1d3 points of Influence for trouncing the adventurers. If you fail by 10 or more, one of your teams is captured (treat this as the entrapment event described above).

Mutiny: This functions like the mutiny event in the Mercenary Company Events table, except you may resolve the event with a different kind of challenge (such as racing through a gauntlet of traps instead of a duel, requiring several skill checks) and you can’t attempt a Profession (soldier) check to end the event.

Rivalry: Another guild is moving in on your territory. Treat this as the rivalry event from Generic Building Events, except you can also end the rivalry and gain 1d4 points of Influence by beating the leader in a duel (as the duel event on the Mercenary Company Event table, but not necessarily to the death) or a thieving challenge.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign. © 2013, Paizo Publishing, LLC; Authors: Jesse Benner, Benjamin Bruck, Jason Bulmahn, Ryan Costello, Adam Daigle, Matt Goetz, Tim Hitchcock, James Jacobs, Ryan Macklin, Colin McComb, Jason Nelson, Richard Pett, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Patrick Renie, Sean K Reynolds, F. Wesley Schneider, James L. Sutter, Russ Taylor, and Stephen Townshend.