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Critical Hits Alternative System

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Make no mistake about it. The ideas presented here are designed to hurt, maim, punish, break and perhaps even kill every creature that dares to draw blood in your campaign. Why? Because in d20 roleplaying games combat breaks down to hits and misses, points lost and who runs out of hit points first. This is done in order to determine who is victorious in a simple and decisive manner. Wounds suffered are nothing more than points subtracted from your total and healing magics are little more than points added. Unfortunately, this takes away any sense of realism and has a tendency to give players the feeling that their characters are no more “alive” than video game icons.

These rules are an attempt to bring back into the game some of the blood and raw nerves realism that is martial combat.

Critical Hits

Combat can be defined as a physical conflict where each participant attempts to inflict injuries upon their opponent while trying to survive the onslaught focused their way. Unfortunately, players can’t experience their character’s pain, exhaustion or sense of impending doom. Because of this lack of connection, many players lose all fear of being attacked and play their characters more like robots (at least during combat) rather than flesh and blood creatures. All too often the high-level warrior, even unarmored, will unflinchingly wade into battle against a dozen or so goblins knowing that he can take the hits and still deal out enough damage to win the battle. In reality, most of us, regardless of our actual combat prowess, would think twice before risking real bodily harm and instead try to resolve the situation through other means. Fear of attack encourages role-play over combat and enriches the game, making the characters seem more real and alive to the players. But in order to illicit that kind of fear in the players, the characters themselves must suffer very real debilitating affects from serious injuries. To this end, we have developed a Critical Effects system that gives characters and their opponents’ precise injuries when they take a particularly brutal hit and suffer the extra damage from a standard critical hit.

Critical Hits and Effects

When an aggressor’s (a PC, NPC or monster) attack roll (total score) is high enough to score a critical threat AND exceeds her minimum required roll to hit her target’s AC by a factor of 5 or more, then its possible to inflict a critical effect along with whatever critical hit damage she may inflict. A critical effect is a specific wound or injury that has a lasting effect upon the victim, sometimes permanently. The severity of the wound depends on the attack roll (including all applicable bonuses) over and above the minimum required roll to hit the target’s AC. This is called the Factor Level. Only the initial attack roll (including all applicable bonuses) determines the Factor Level, not the roll to determine an actual critical hit.

Example: Olivia (fighter 1, BAB +1), wielding her longsword, attacks an orc who’s AC is 14. She rolls a 19 (+ 1 = 20 total), which is within her weapon’s critical threat range. She rolls again to determine if she scored a critical hit. Her second roll is a 15 (+1 =16). She scores critical hit damage (total damage x2), but since her initial attack roll (a 20) was 5 or more over what she needed to hit the orc’s AC she also inflicts a critical effect. In this case she scores a Mild critical effect. (20 – 14 =6).

Table 1-1: Critical Effect Factor Levels
Factor Level Severity
5 above minimum attack roll Mild
10 above minimum attack roll Moderate
15 above minimum attack roll Serious

Sidebar: Smaller Creatures Striking the Heads of Larger Creatures

In most fantasy worlds the relative size of combatants can vary incredibly. Unfortunately, the critical effects system presented in this book doesn’t take this into consideration when randomly determining where a critical hit landed. To help remedy this, the following guidelines are suggested.

If the attacking creature is smaller than it’s intended target by two size categories or more, it cannot strike at the target’s head (or any portion of the body that is elevated well above the attacker) unless that portion of the body was previously used to attack the smaller creature during that same round. In other words, the smaller creature can’t strike the intended target’s head unless it tried to bite him first or he can’t attack the intended target’s wing (if its elevated well above the him) unless it tried to buffet him first and so on. Of course, if the smaller creature can utilize some method to elevate itself to an equal or greater height than his intended target (i.e. flying, climbing, jumping, etc.), this is no longer an issue.

Obviously, these guidelines apply only to melee combat situations and are irrelevant when using ranged weapons.

Drawn and Quartered

Once you have determined the severity of the critical effect you must figure out just what body part has been affected. Each creature is a compilation of a number of body parts, usually consisting of a head, a body and a number of different appendages in a variety of combinations. Roll on the table below to determine the body location affected, if a body location is rolled that does not apply to the target just re-roll. Then find that body location and its critical effect listed below.

Table 1-2: Body Location
Roll 1d20 Body Location
1-4 Arm: Any appendage used to manipulate objects or to attack.
5-7 Tail: Used for either balance, movement or attacking.
8-11 Leg: Any appendage used primarily for movement and sometimes to attack (kicking).
12-15 Torso: The main or central body usually containing most of the vital organs.
16-18 Wing: Any appendage used primarily for flight and sometimes to attack (buffeting).
19-20 Head: Usually contains the creature’s brain, mouth and most of its sensory organs.

Sidebar: Variant: Creatures Immune to Critical Hits.

While some creatures, such as constructs, elementals, plants and undead, are immune to critical hits, they may still be affected by certain results from a critical effect. Even though they ignore any hit point damage from a critical hit, a broken or severed appendage or damaged sensory organ can still have a serious affect on how many of these creatures function. This can reduce the creature’s movement rate, number of attacks or even their ability to sense their opponents.

It is up to your Gamemaster whether or not these creatures are vulnerable to critical effects. If so, use the critical hits and effects system as normal. Ignore the additional critical hit damage you would normally apply to the target and only apply the resulting critical effect to the creature. Some Serious level effects include additional hit point damage. Creatures immune to critical hits should also ignore this additional damage.

Critical Effects:

All debilitating effects (unless otherwise noted) last until the victim has received either healing applied directly to the specific wound or has received healing equal to the hit points lost in the attack that caused the critical effect. As a general rule, most Mild and Moderate effects can be healed either magically or naturally, however Serious effects are usually permanent and can only be healed or cured through means other than natural healing.

This system is not 100% foolproof. Sooner or later someone’s going to roll an effect that doesn’t exactly match with a particular creature, such as a broken ribcage on an invertebrate or a jawbone hit for a creature that has no definable jaw. Although the game mechanic of the critical effect should remain consistent, the Gamemaster is more than welcome to ad lib/improvise different and more detailed descriptions of the action and wounds suffered.

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Perform, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, and Swim skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Perform, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, Swim skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Stealth, and Swim skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Stealth, and Swim skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -1 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Ride, Stealth or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -5 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Ride, Stealth or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Wing (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim’s flying speed is reduced by half and maneuverability worsens by one category. Victim suffers a -2 penalty on Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The wing is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The wing has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The wing has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim can now only use the wing to glide (clumsy) and can take off only from an elevated position. When attempting to land, victim must roll a Dexterity check (DC 17) or flounder and crash, taking 2d6 hit points of damage. The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must also roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, wing is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The wing is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The wing has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls and Perception checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls and Perception checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Body Profiles

For those of you that are sticklers for detail and want to know, and keep track of, exactly which body location are hit, an alternative to the above mentioned critical hits and effects system has been developed. Body profiles allow you to quickly determine just where a critical hit has landed and which specific body location is affected by a critical effect. While many of the critical effects listed below are identical to those previously listed, some have been modified to better reflect more realistic effects for certain body profiles.

When trying to determine into which body profile a particular creature belongs remember that not every antenna, frill, fin, horn or pseudopodia is accounted for. These are generally ignored because a critical hit to these areas will not have a serious effect on the creature, at least not in game terms. For instance, look at the Tyrannosaurus Rex. He has a head, body, tail, two legs and two arms. By definition, he is a Complex Humanoid. However, since the T-rex’s forelimbs are so small and all but non-functional you could argue that a critical hit to either of these appendages would not seriously impair his effectiveness. So, if the forelimbs were not being taken into account, then the T-rex would be considered a Bipedal profile (a head, body, tail and two legs). Be sure to use only the relevant body locations of the creature to determine which body profile to should be used.

To determine where a critical hit has landed roll the appropriate sided die (listed on the corresponding table) for the body profile of the target. For creatures with multiples of the same body location, use the closest numbered die to determine which of these is affected. (Example: two right-side wings use odd or even, three tails use 1d3, etc.) Then look up the body location, severity level and type of injury to determine the exact critical effect.

A Breakdown of Body Locations:

Head: This usually contains the creature’s brain, mouth and most of its sensory organs.

Sensory Organs: eyes, ears, nose, antennae, etc. (sometimes used for attacks, i.e. gaze attacks)

Mouth: Orifice mainly for talking, tasting, biting and eating.

Torso: This is the main or central body usually containing most of the vital organs.

Arm(s): Appendages used to manipulate objects or to attack.

Leg(s): Appendages used primarily for locomotion and sometimes to attack (kicking).

Wing(s): Appendages used primarily for flight and sometimes to attack (buffeting).

Tail: Used for either balance, movement or attacking.

Some of these body profiles resemble the Monster Type usually found near the top of a creature’s description or stat block. Be careful not to confuse these with the creature’s Body Profile. Many Aberration types are Complex Humanoids, many Reptilian types are not Draconic and so on.

When you look at each body location table you may notice that the percentage chance to hit a right leg, left arm, head or torso are all the same. This has been done intentionally to keep the system as simple and quick to use as possible and with good reason. First of all, within the parameters of each body profile the creatures represented vary immensely in size, shape and proportions, making an accurate percentile table nigh impossible. Such a weighted table may work for the majority of the creatures represented, but a significant percentage would be misrepresented. Secondly, when you are involved in combat (especially melee) you are constantly attacking and countering, always searching for that one opportunity to strike a particularly weak spot (a critical hit). That one opportunity, that weak spot, can present itself at anytime and anywhere along your opponent’s body. This is why we feel it can be just as difficult to strike a critical hit on a given body location as on any other.

Please note that under each critical effect some descriptions are relatively vague and some are a little more precise, but all contain a specific penalty mechanic. Although the game mechanics should always be applied to the situation, the Gamemaster is more than welcome to ad lib and improvise different and more detailed descriptions of the action and wounds suffered.

Table 1-3: Body Profiles
Profile Name Type of die used Page Number Examples
Abomination 1d4   blood boulder, chaos beast, darkmantle, gibbering mouther, grick, hovara, mimic, otyugh and ort.
Bipedal 1d6   digester, ethereal marauder and tyrannosaurus rex.
Dibrachium 1d6   cuttershark, merfolk, salamander, and sea lion.
Draconic 1d10   asherake, balor, chromithian, dragon, gargoyle, griffon, lammasu, manticore, pegasus and sphinx.
Eight-legged Beast 1d12   aranea, basilisk, scorpion and phase spider.
Four-legged Beast 1d8   aboleth, achaierai, arrowhawk, bulette, hellhound, kytus, lillend, owdi, stark, tarrasque, tumble ox, unicorn, worg and wyvern.
Humanoid 1d8   elf, ettercap, ghoul, giant, grimlock, hobgoblin, hound archon, kith, kobold, lizardfolk, medusa nymph, ogre, picker, satyr.
Serpentine 1d4   frostbiter, frost worm, naga, purple worm, scavan, slather and thoqqua.
Six-legged Beast 1d10   ankheg, ebon spider, formian, rust monster, shock beetle and xill.

This system is not 100% foolproof. Sooner or later someone’s going to roll an effect that doesn’t exactly match with a particular creature. Such as a broken ribcage on an invertebrate or a jawbone hit for a creature that has no definable jaw. Although the game mechanic of the critical effect should remain consistent, the Gamemaster is more than welcome to ad lib/improvise different and more detailed descriptions of the action and wounds suffered.

Abomination profile

This body profile is for creatures with no true definable form that consists of any number of body areas, which we have broken down four different types: sensory organs, mouths, main body and appendages (used for locomotion or to attack).

Table 1-4: Abomination Profile
d4 Body Location Hit Called Shot Penalty
1 Sensory Organ -8
2 Mouth -6
3 Main Body (torso) -3
4 Appendage -5

Critical Effects:

Sensory Organ

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all skill checks (or attacks) involving that organ.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The organ is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The organ has been jabbed.

Slashing: Cut: The exterior of the organ has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim has effectively lost use of any senses involving that organ and either suffers a -8 penalty to all skill checks involving that organ or cannot use it at all. (Gamemaster’s discretion)

Bludgeoning: Broken: The organ has internal bleeding.

Piercing: Pierced: The organ has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Lacerated: The organ has been deeply cut.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The organ has been ruined and is now ruined and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The organ is penetrated deeply, torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The organ has been severed or otherwise extracted.

Mouth:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks involving the mouth and Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Linguistics, and Perform (any verbal component) skill checks. Casting spells with verbal components suffer a 20% chance of failure.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The jaw is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The side of the mouth has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The lip or gum has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks involving the mouth and Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate Linguistics, and Perform (any verbal component) skill checks. Casting spells with verbal components is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Broken: The jawbone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The lip, gum and/or tongue have been severely punctured.

Slashing: Teeth knocked out: Victim loses 1d4 teeth/fangs.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must also roll a Constitution check (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. Casting spells with verbal components and even normal speech is now impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Mouth is ruined with most teeth missing and is now completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The jaw is torn open with a few missing teeth and is now completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The jaw and/or tongue have been completely severed.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Fly, Perform, Ride, Stealth or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Fly, Perform, Ride, Stealth or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Handle Animal, Perform, Stealth or Swim skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Handle Animal, Perform, Stealth or Swim skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Wing (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim’s flying speed is reduced by half and maneuverability worsens by one category. Victim also suffers a -2 penalty to all Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The wing is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The wing has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The wing has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim can now only use the wing to glide (clumsy) and can take off only from an elevated position. When attempting to land, victim must roll a Dexterity check (DC 17) or flounder and crash, taking 2d6 hit points of damage. The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must also roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, wing is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The wing is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The wing has been severed from the body.

Bipedal profile

This body profile consists of a head, torso, two appendages (usually legs), and a tail.

Table 1-5: Bipedal Profile
d6 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage (Right) -5
2 Appendage (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Head -8
6 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -4 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, Stealth and Swim skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by three quarters, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, Stealth and Swim skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. Normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Ride, Stealth, or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Ride, Stealth, or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -10 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a – 4 penalty to Initiative rolls and Perception checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Dibrachium profile

This body profile consists of a head, main body (or torso), two appendages (pectoral fins or arms) and a tail.

Table 1-6: Dibrachium Profile
d6 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage (Right) -5
2 Appendage (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Head -8
6 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Pectoral Fin (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -3 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by one quarter and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, fin is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The fin is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The fin has been severed from the body.

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Draconic profile

This body profile consists of a head, torso, two legs, two arms, two wings and a tail.

Table 1-7: Draconic Profile
d10 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg (Right) -5
2 Leg (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Wing (Right) -5
6 Wing (Left) -5
7 Arm (Right) -5
8 Arm (Left) -5
9 Head -8
10 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Wing (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim’s flying speed is reduced by half and maneuverability worsens by one category. Victim also suffers a -2 penalty to all Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The wing is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The wing has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The wing has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim can now only use the wing to glide (clumsy) and can take off only from an elevated position. When attempting to land, victim must roll a Dexterity check (DC 17) or flounder and crash, taking 2d6 hit points of damage. The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Fly skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must also roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, wing is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The wing is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The wing has been severed from the body.

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Eight-legged Beast profile

This body profile consists of eight appendages, a body (or thorax), a head and tail (or abdomen).

Table 1-8: Eight-legged Beast Profile
d12 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage ( A ) -5
2 Appendage ( B ) -5
3 Appendage ( C ) -5
4 Appendage ( D ) -5
5 Appendage ( E ) -5
6 Appendage ( F ) -5
7 Appendage ( G ) -5
8 Appendage ( H ) -5
9 Head -8
10 Body (or Thorax) -3
11 Tail (or Abdomen) -3
12 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Leg (appendage):

Due to the number of legs possible, Critical Effects on multiple legs are not accumulative until 40% of the total number of the creature’s legs have been affected.

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Body (thorax):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Four-legged Beast profile

This body profile consists of a head, torso, four legs (or appendages) and a tail.

Table 1-9: Four-legged Beast Profile
d8 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg ( A ) -5
2 Leg ( B ) -5
3 Leg ( C ) -5
4 Leg ( D ) -5
5 Torso -3
6 Tail -3
7 Head -8
8 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Humanoid profile

Simple Humanoid

This body profile consists of two arms, two legs, a head and torso.

Complex Humanoid

This body profile consists of two arms, two legs, a head, a torso and an additional body part. (i.e. a tail, extra head or appendage, a tentacle, etc.)

Table 1-10: Humanoid Profile
d8 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg (Right) -5
2 Leg (Left) -5
3 Arm (Right) -5
4 Arm (Left) -5
5 Torso -3
6 Tail or Roll Again -3
7 Head -8
8 Additional Body Part or Roll Again As per Body Part

Critical Effects

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Serpentine profile

This body profile consists of a head, torso and a tail.

Table 1-11: Serpentine Profile
d4 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Torso -3
2 Tail -3
3 Head -8
4 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Torso (body):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Six-legged Beast profile

This body profile consists of a head, torso (or thorax), six appendages and a tail (or abdomen).

Table 1-12: Six-legged Beast Profile
d10 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage ( A ) -5
2 Appendage ( B ) -5
3 Appendage ( C ) -5
4 Appendage ( D ) -5
5 Appendage ( E ) -5
6 Appendage ( F ) -5
7 Head -8
8 Body (or Thorax) -3
9 Tail (or Abdomen) -3
10 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA

Critical Effects:

Arm (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The upper arm is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The upper arm has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The upper arm has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to all attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Sleight of Hand, Swim and Use Magic Device skill checks involving that arm. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Digit(s) severed: Victim loses 1d4 fingers/claws

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, hand/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The hand/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The hand/claw has been severed from the arm.

Leg (appendage):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to all Dexterity bonuses for AC (if any) and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks involving that leg.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The thigh (or upper leg) area is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The thigh has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The thigh has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to any Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride, and Stealth skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has been snapped; however it is a clean break.

Piercing: Pierced: A joint has been severely punctured and run through.

Slashing: Slashed: A joint has been split open or cut a major ligament.

Severity: Serious

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Multiple bones are broken, foot/claw is now lame and completely useless.

Piercing: Impaled: The foot/claw is torn open and is now ruined and completely useless.

Slashing: Severed: The foot/claw has been severed from the leg.

Head:

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The blow causes a deeply bruised or blackened eye or jaw.

Piercing: Stabbed: A jab to the skull leaves a small but bleeding wound.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s scalp is split open and bleeds profusely.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Bludgeoning: Cracked: Blow cracks the victim’s jaw. Cannot speak command words properly or cast spells with verbal components. Victim suffers a -4 penalty to Linguistics and Perform skill checks that involve singing, speaking or playing a musical instrument.

Piercing: Pierced: Victim takes severe eye damage and suffers a -4 penalty to ranged attacks and Perception checks.

Slashing: Split open: Victim takes hearing damage. Suffers a -4 penalty to Initiative rolls, Acrobatics and Perception skill checks and has a 10% of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Victim’s skull is partially caved in.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the skull.

Slashing: Slashed: The victim’s throat is slashed open.

Body (thorax):

Severity: Mild

Effect: Victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: Victim’s back or chest is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: Victim takes a jab to the gut. The wound bleeds moderately.

Slashing: Cut: Victim’s side is sliced open. The wound bleeds moderately.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: Victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Perform, Ride or Swim skill checks. This also slows down the victim, reducing its base movement rate by half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A number of ribs are cracked and/or broken.

Piercing: Pierced: The blow has punctured the chest. Heavy Bleeding.

Slashing: Gash: The victim’s back or chest has been severely slashed and torn open. Heavy Bleeding.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim dies in a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier. The victim must roll a Will save (DC 20) to take any action during this time.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: The victim’s ribcage has been crushed.

Piercing: Impaled: The victim is pierced through the heart and/or lungs.

Slashing: Gutted: The victim has been disemboweled.

Tail (abdomen):

Severity: Mild

Effect: The victim suffers a -2 penalty to attacks and Acrobatics skill checks. The victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one quarter.

Bludgeoning: Bruised: The tail is deeply bruised.

Piercing: Stabbed: The tail has been pierced.

Slashing: Cut: The tail has been sliced open.

Severity: Moderate

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to attacks involving the tail and Acrobatics skill checks. If the tail is used for locomotion, the victim’s base movement rate is reduced by one half.

Bludgeoning: Broken: A bone has snapped.

Piercing: Pierced: The base of the tail has been severely punctured.

Slashing: Gash: A significant length of the tail has been split open.

Severity: Serious

Effect: The victim suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics skill checks. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury. If the tail is used for locomotion, normal movement is impossible.

Bludgeoning: Crushed: Many bones are broken, tail useless.

Piercing: Impaled: Tail is torn open, ruined and useless.

Slashing: Severed: The tail has been severed from the body.

Combination profile

This body profile is for creatures that are a combination of two (or more, if possible) body profiles listed above, such as a creature that is half four-legged beast and half humanoid. First, determine which half of the creature is struck. Choose which body profile is odd and even and then roll any die. Then roll on the table above as normal for that particular body profile. If you roll a body location that is not present on that half of the creature you may accept that location on the creature as a whole regardless or roll again. Examples of a Combination body profile are: centaur, drider, and lamia.

Bleeding

Some Gamemasters want a little more realism in their game and like the prospect of seeing their players’ characters suffer and bleed from their critical wounds. To sate their sadistic desires, an optional rules system has been developed that he may implement.

Blood loss damage assessments are evaluated first: a standard hit point loss mechanic that is based on the level of blood loss, and the loss of Constitution points based on the level of blood loss.

Table 1-13: Hit Point Method
Mild blood loss Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Moderate blood loss Target takes an extra d6 hit points per round until treated
Heavy blood loss Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Table 1-13A: Hit Point Method and Loss of Limb According to Body Type
Abomination Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, eight-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, six-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, four-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Draconic Target takes an extra d6 hit points per round until treated
Bipedal Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Dibrachium Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Humanoid Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Serpentine Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Table 1-14: Constitution Loss Method
Mild blood loss Target takes 1 point Constitution damage every 2 minutes until treated
Moderate blood loss Target takes 1 point Constitution damage every minute until treated
Heavy blood loss Target takes 2 points Constitution damage every minutes until treated
Table 1-14A: Constitution and Loss of Limb According to Body Type
Abomination If target has limbs, 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, eight-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, six-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, four-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Draconic Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Bipedal Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Dibrachium Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Humanoid Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Serpentine Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated

Definitions

Shock is considered the same thing as being unconscious. The target is not able to do anything but look in horror at the wound. The base damage of the weapon will be equal to the weapon’s maximum base damage, not what is rolled. In the case of a greatsword, when applying the effects of the weapon’s base damage to a critical effect: The base damage would be 12 derived from 2d6 (6+6=12), the maximum base damage of a greatsword.

Stacking Penalties

Penalties for critical effects do not stack if they are from the same location. If a creature takes a second critical effect to the same area, the level of the critical effect is raised by one or more (depending on the first and second effects). The maximum effect is, of course, Serious. If the penalties are from different locations they do stack. So -5 to attack from a torso injury and -8 from a moderate arm critical would be a -13 to attack.

Note: Blood loss penalties do not stack. If it is just general bleeding that is not related to limb removal, go to the next highest level. Mild bleeding would become Moderate with the highest level being Serious. If you are using the hit point method for limb removal, simply go to the next higher die (for example, d4 becomes d6). The highest die that may be used is d8. At the GM’s discretion, it may be raised to a maximum d10. For the Constitution loss method, simply add 1 to the Constitution damage. Once again at the GM’s discretion, the highest level of 2 may be raised to a maximum of 3 Constitution points in damage if multiple limbs have been removed.

Hit point reduction when a limb is removed

Subtract the percentage of the limb from the target’s overall hit point total. For example, if a Draconic target had an arm or limb removed it represents 10% of their total hit points. This is now subtracted from their hit point total to become the new hit point total based on the removed limb. So if a target had 100 hit points and had an arm or limb removed (Draconic) they would now have a new hit point total of 90 (100 x 10%=10;100-10=90). Remember to always round down. The table below gives the percentage hit point value a limb represents based on body type. The target will suffer the percentage loss for limb removal. This will then be subtracted from the target’s current hit point total. For ease of play do not reconfigure the new hit point total until combat is over. The subtraction from hit points for the limb is permanent unless the limb is regenerated. Even when the target heals and is at maximum hit points the he will still suffer the penalty for having the limb removed.

Table 1-15: Limb Removal and Hit Point Loss
Abomination If has limbs, -5% of total hit points
Beast, eight-legged -5% of total hit points
Beast, six-legged -10% of total hit points
Beast, four-legged -10% of total hit points
Draconic -10% of total hit points
Bipedal -15% of total hit points
Dibrachium -15% of total hit points
Humanoid -15% of total hit points
Serpentine -15% of total hit points for the tail (lower part of the body)

For limbs that are larger or smaller than the typical body type, an addition or subtraction will be made to hit point reduction based on the size of the limb. There are 3 categories: Smaller than Normal, Standard, and Larger than Normal. An addition or subtraction should be made to the % hit point loss based on the category. It should be noted that the % hit point reduction for limb removal can never be less than 1%. So if an eight-legged creature had a smaller than normal limb the % hit point loss would be 1% (5-5=0 remember can never be less than 1%).

Smaller than Normal -5% to the hit point loss
Standard/Normal Size +0% to the hit point loss
Larger than Normal +5% to the hit point loss

The percentages do stack. So if an eight-legged creature had 4 limbs removed, the percentage value would be 4×5%=20% of the creature hit points. Ouch!

Called Shots

Sometimes a character will wish to strike a particular body part in hopes for a specific effect such as hitting the target’s knee to cripple or slow them down, hitting the eyes to blind, or hitting a hand to dislodge a weapon or item. This can certainly be done, however it is very hard to do. Use the following rules for the requirements and possible consequences of attempting a Called Shot.

The following are mandatory rules/requirements to perform a Called Shot.

– You must announce that you are attempting a Called Shot at the beginning of your turn. This is a standard action.

– You must roll a successful Dexterity check (DC 25) as you take careful aim. If you fail you may not attempt a Called Shot or your normal attacks; however you can perform a free, swift and/or move action. Note: If you have the Weapon Focus feat with the weapon in question this reduces the Dexterity check to a DC 20.

– You may attempt only one Called Shot each round.

– The target cannot have moved more than 5 ft. in that round before your attempt. If the target does move more than 5 ft. in that round before your attempt, you incur a –5 circumstance penalty in addition to all other accumulated penalties.

– Delivering a Called Shot provokes attacks of opportunity (AOO) from threatening foes (other than your target) because it involves focused concentration and methodical action.

Once these criteria are met you can attempt a called shot. You receive a called shot penalty to your attack roll, as per the chart below for the appropriate body location. Your Gamemaster may increase this penalty if the target area is particularly well armored or rapidly moving. Please note that when calculating the AC of a body location that areas unprotected by the target’s armor (usually the head) do not receive the target’s armor bonus. If you attempt to hit a specific part of a body location, (such as the hand on an Arm, the eyes or mouth of the Head, or the hamstring or knee of the Leg, etc.) the called shot penalty increases by 3. (See the Critical Effects for specific targets section below for more details)

Table 1-17: Called Shot Penalties
Body Location Called Shot Penalty
Head -8
Sensory Organs -8
Mouth -6
Body (torso) -3
Tail (abdomen) -3
Appendages (Arms, Legs, Wings) -5

Should your attack roll succeed, you automatically score a Critical Hit and Critical Effect (Moderate) as is appropriate to the relevant body part hit. If you miss, you miss. If you miss on the called shot but your attack roll still scores a standard hit (that is the target’s AC without the Called Shot penalty), it is considered a glancing blow, and normal damage is applied to the creatures’ hit points as would a standard attack.

Attempting the Impossible

You may wonder just how a gnome wielding a light mace can score a called shot on a hill giant’s head? While it IS possible, remember combat is a very chaotic dance. Combatants are constantly moving around, turning and shifting from side to side and larger creatures must bend down to attack smaller opponents. Still, some situations may very well be too extreme to be plausible. As always, your Gamemaster has final say as to what can and can’t be done. (See the Smaller creatures striking the heads of larger creatures sidebar at the beginning of this chapter.)

Critical Effects for specific targets

If you attempt a called shot to a specific area (as listed below) and succeed, you inflict the critical effect listed below for the area hit. However, you do not inflict the standard critical hit damage, but instead inflict only the damage you would normally incur from a standard hit.

To attempt a called shot to a specific area with a ranged weapon the target must be within the initial range increment of the weapon used (i.e. 10 ft. for dagger, 100 ft. for longbow, etc.). Note that certain feats and special abilities can greatly affect the effective initial range increment of a weapon.

Hitting a specific target requires precision and some weapons are far too large and bulky to accurately strike such a diminutive target. As always, the Gamemaster should use logic, common sense and her best judgment to determine if such an attack is even possible.

Ear:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -11 (this penalty may be reduced if the ear is of larger proportions than normal. (i.e. rabbit ears))

Effect: The victim suffers a -5 penalty to Acrobatics, Disable Device, Perception, Perform and Stealth skill checks and/or cannot use that ear at all. (Game Masters discretion) The victim also receives a -2 penalty to Charisma due to the physical appearance of the injury and bleeding.

Bludgeoning: The impact has ruined the inner ear.

Piercing: The ear is punctured and torn open.

Slashing: The ear is sliced open (or clean off, GM’s choice).

Eye:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -11

Effect: The victim suffers a -5 penalty to Appraise, Perception, and Spellcraft skill checks and/or cannot use that eye at all. (Game Masters discretion) The victim also receives a -2 penalty to Charisma due to the physical appearance of the injury and bleeding.

Bludgeoning: The eye has been smashed and ruined.

Piercing: The eye is penetrated and torn open and is now completely useless. Victim must also roll a Fortitude save (DC 20) or go into shock and suffer an additional hit point loss equal to the base damage of the weapon used to cause the injury.

Slashing: The eye has been deeply cut causing blindness.

Groin:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -6

Effect: The victim is Dazed for one round and suffers a -2 circumstance penalty to all attack and Reflex save rolls for 1d6 rounds (including the Dazed round).

Bludgeoning: The groin has been deeply bruised.

Piercing: The groin area has been impaled and is bleeding.

Slashing: The groin area has been sliced open and is bleeding.

Note: Any other “consequences” resulting from a hit to the groin are up to each individual Gamemaster.

Hamstring:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -8

Effect: see text below.

Bludgeoning: The area is deeply bruised but with no substantial affect other than normal damage.

Piercing: The area is skewered and the victim’s movement rate is reduced by 15 ft. and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Slashing: The victim suffers a -5 penalty to Acrobatics, Climb, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, Stealth and Swim skill checks, a -10 ft. reduction in movement rate and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Hand:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -8

Effect: The victim suffers a -5 penalty to all attacks involving that hand and Acrobatics, Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Handle Animal, ,Perform, Ride, Sleight of Hand and Use Magic Device skill checks. Victim must roll a Strength check (DC 17) each round or lose any held item, shield or weapon.

Bludgeoning: One or more small bones in the hand are cracked or broken.

Piercing: The hand has been run clean through.

Slashing: The hand has sliced across the face of the hand, cutting some tendons.

Knee:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -8

Effect: The victim’s movement rate is reduced by half, suffers a -8 penalty to Acrobatics, Climb, Perform, Ride, Stealth and Swim skill checks and loses all Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any).

Bludgeoning: The kneecap has been smashed.

Piercing: The joint has been impaled and rendered immobile.

Slashing: The joint has been carved open and some tendons have been cut.

Mouth:

Minimum Called Shot Penalty: -11

Effect: The victim suffers a -5 penalty to all attacks and Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Linguistics and Perform skill checks. Casting spells with verbal components is impossible. The victim also receives a -2 penalty to Charisma due to the physical nature of the wound and bleeding.

Bludgeoning: Victim loses 1d4 teeth/fangs.

Piercing: The jaw/cheeks or lips are punctured and torn open.

Slashing: Victim loses 1d4 teeth/fangs.

Critical Fumbles

During an altercation quick reflexes, high adrenalin and split second decisions are in high order and, more often than we would like, these extreme conditions sometimes lead to clumsy acts, botched attacks and sometimes-fatal accidents. An improperly notched arrow or awkwardly swung weapon can not only cost you a missed attack but also endanger yourself or your allies. This can be especially true when using an attack of opportunity.

To illustrate this side of combat, a variant rule for critical fumbles has been developed. If you roll a natural 1 on an attack, you must roll a Dexterity check (DC 15). Failure constitutes a Critical Fumble. To determine the extent of the fumble use the following equation.

1d4 + your Dexterity modifier (minimum 0, maximum +4)

Now use that total to determine the effect of the critical fumble on the table below.

Table 1-18: Critical Fumbles
Total Score Fumble Effect
1 You strike ally – You strike an ally within your weapon’s reach/range (Gamemaster’s choice). Damage inflicted equals the weapon’s unmodified base damage.
2 You fall on weapon– You strike yourself with your own weapon. Damage inflicted equals the weapon’s unmodified base damage.
3 You lose your weapon. Roll for direction (1d8 on a compass) and distance (odd= 5 ft. even=10ft.).
4 You trip – You lose your footing and fall prone; you must use a standard or movement action to regain your footing (this does provoke an attack of opportunity).
5 You are disoriented – You get turned around and lose your action for the rest of this round and the next (this does not provoke an attack of opportunity).
6 You overextend your attack – You lunge or swing too wide and provoke an attack of opportunity from any hostile opponents in range to do so.
7 You are considered Dazed for one full round as you regain your composure (this provokes an attack of opportunity).
8 GM’s choice

Healing and Helping

In a majority of fantasy campaigns, the actual healing of wounds isn’t given much thought. Spells and potions often restore lost hit points and the actual wounds aren’t really addressed except in a general overall manner. But what really entails healing? For gamers looking for something more to it than just marking her character’s condition based upon the current amount of hit points versus maximum, a more in-depth approach can be taken.

Natural Healing

In campaigns where high magic and fantasy are prevalent, the use of the Heal skill tends to be quickly supplanted with magical methods of healing like potions or spells. Healing skill checks may be used for several situations including first aid, short-term care, long-term care, and treatment of poison or disease. At low levels, it is common for a character to have a few ranks in Heal to increase his odds of survival. However, as he advances in levels, other skills begin to take priority over Heal. The following variant rule gives the use of Heal more importance by allowing for the potential of healing more damage than normal and avoiding the need for a curative potion or spell.

Under the standard rules, a character can be given first aid to stabilize a life-threatening injury and preventing her from dying. However, using the Heal skill for first aid does not provide hit points beyond those needed to reach stabilization. Following the same format established under the assessment of critical hit severity, “factor levels” have been established which allows for additional hit points being granted for successful Heal checks.

Table 2-1: Healing Factor Levels
Factor Level DC Requirements
0 15 Minimum required DC to be successful
1 20 5 above minimum required DC to be successful
2 25 10 above minimum required DC to be successful
3 30 15 above minimum required DC to be successful

Synergy bonuses do apply when attempting any manner of Heal check. This includes those characters with a minimum of 5 ranks in Profession (herbalist) and/or those using a healer’s kit, which is limited to no more than ten uses.

First Aid

When applying first aid, a character may choose to make an attempt to do more than just stabilize a wounded companion. If he surpasses the first aid factor level DC of his desired roll, his patient gains a certain member of hit points above those necessary to bring him to zero.

Table 2-2: First Aid Factor Levels
First Aid Factor Level DC Result
0 15 Stabilization only
1 20 Stabilization plus 1d2 hp
2 25 Stabilization plus 1d4 hp
3 30 Stabilization plus 1d6 hp

If a character is unsuccessful in his attempt to make a higher factor level Heal check but still rolls higher than DC 15, he stabilizes the wounded individual but no additional hit points are granted. A skill check that does not exceed DC 15 means that patient still continues to bleed and remains in need of stabilizing.

Short-term Care

Short-term care is a new conceptual use for the Heal skill. This measure of care requires the use of a healer’s kit and is meant to offer an alternative to the spell cure light wounds. Short-term care should NOT be used during the heat of combat unless the healer makes a successful Will save (DC 18) to avoid distraction and the patient is already stabilized. Furthermore, it takes five minutes to perform the needed curative measures (applying salves, changing bandages, etc.) and may only be performed once per day on an individual. If the healer takes damage during this time, the attempt to heal fails and he must begin anew.

The patient must be in a complete state of inactivity or rest while his wounds are being treated and the healer is deep in concentration. Short-term care does leave the healer and patient open to an attack of opportunity should an opponent enter a threat zone because the healer is so focused and the wounded individual is unable to respond. This is another reason why short-term care should not be performed during combat unless there is no other option.

If the Will save (performed only during combat) is successful, the player must then make a Heal check at the declared factor level DC to restore hit points to the wounded character. The healer may take 10 for this attempt but not take 20. Synergy bonuses do apply.

Table 2-3: Short-Term Care Factor Levels
Short-Term Care Factor Level DC Result
0 15 No extra hit points restored
1 20 Restoration of 1d4 hp + patient’s Con modifier
2 25 Restoration of 1d6 hp + patient’s Con modifier
3 30 Restoration of 1d8 hp + patient’s Con modifier

If the initial Will save fails (again, only performed during combat), the character may make a new attempt on the following round. If the necessary DC roll is not met, no additional hit points are restored. However, if the Heal check roll is unsuccessful by 5 or more below the minimum factor level (DC 15), the wound has been reopened and begins to bleed. The wounded person loses a single hit point as a result of the blood loss and now requires a successful Heal (first aid) check to stabilize the bleeding.

Long-term Care

Long-term care can be a way to use the Heal skill to accelerate the process of natural healing. This form of care also requires the use of a healer’s kit and complete rest on the part of the wounded individual. Long-term care implies that an injured character is convalescing in a safe location away from the immediate threat of harm for more than a single day. Synergy bonuses are applicable and the healer may take 10 but not 20 when treating the injured character.

Table 2-4: Long-Term Care Factor Levels
Long-Term Care Factor Level DC Result
0 15 Normal rate of healing (1 hp per level or 1 ability point per day)
1 20 Double rate of healing (2 hp per level or 2 ability points per day)
2 25 Triple rate of healing (3 hp per level or 3 ability points per day)
3 30 Quadruple rate of healing (4 hp per level or 4 ability points per day)

If the Heal check is not made for the desired factor level roll, then the wounded character will heal at the normal rate for that day (treat as a DC 15 roll). A new Heal roll attempt may be made on the following day. Only one long-term care attempt may be made on a single individual per day regardless of the number of healers present.

Wounds and Healing

Natural healing of wounds takes time. The human body is simply incapable of completely mending itself overnight. It does, however, work to regenerate and heal to a small degree. So how does one apply this gradual form of healing into a game mechanic that doesn’t bog down play or become incredibly complicated? Using the existing Heal skill and the various forms of critical damage and effects that were outlined earlier, it is possible to develop a system that takes gradual healing and recovery into account, providing more realism to the game, especially for the low or no-magic campaigns. By adding modifiers to the base DC of a Heal skill check it becomes more difficult for a healer to speed the healing and recovery process. Table 2-5 illustrates this by showing the various wound categories as they relate to the total percentage of lost hit points from a single combat encounter and their respective modifier to the DC of a Heal skill check for short-term or long-term care.

Table 2-5: Wound Modifiers
Wound Category Total Percentage Loss of HP Healing DC Modifier
Minor 1 – 20% +0
Mild 21 – 40% +1
Moderate 41 – 60% +2
Severe 61 – 80% +3
Life-Threatening 81 – 100% +6

Minor wounds reflect a battle where the player received the equivalent of a few injuries. They are not serious enough to impede normal healing attempts. Each progressive wound category beyond this signifies a more serious or severe set of wounds that the character received in battle, be it deep cuts or blunt trauma. For example, if a healer wanted to use short-term care and attempt a factor level 2 Heal check on Thunderhead, the dwarf barbarian, his base DC is 20. However, if the wounded patient has sustained enough wounds to qualify as Severe, then the Heal DC has now been increased to 23 (not taking into account synergy bonuses which may reduce the DC). This equates into a much longer healing time due to the higher probability of an unsuccessful attempt by the healer, which should force the player to be more attentive to his character’s potential frailties.

Additional modifiers are applied if the character was subjected to one or more critical hits during the combat encounter. Furthermore, any appropriate penalties should be applied depending on the location of the critical effect and the type of wound.

Table 2-6: Critical Effects Modifiers
Critical Effect Typeand Category Healing DC Modifier Time to Heal (Unaided/Aided)
Mild (Bludgeoning) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Mild (Piercing) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Mild (Slashing) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Moderate (Bludgeoning) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks
Moderate (Piercing) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks
Moderate (Slashing) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks

In our above example, Thunderhead’s sustained injuries have resulted in a Heal DC of 23 for factor level 2 short-term care. However, during the course of that combat Thunderhead sustained a critical hit from a giant who was a good aim with rocks. The critical effect turned out to be Moderate and the location of the injury was the leg. Because it was a bludgeoning weapon and a Moderate effect, the Heal DC is now increased to DC 31 for factor level 2 short-term care. Furthermore, Thunderhead has a broken leg resulting in his movement rate being reduced by half. He also suffers a –8 penalty to any skill checks involving that leg and he loses any Dexterity benefit towards AC (if any) until the leg is healed. A successful Heal check results in the restoration of 1d6 hp + Thunderhead’s Constitution modifier but in order to directly apply that amount to his broken leg, the intent must be declared prior to making the Heal check. If the number of hit points gained back from the Heal check equals or exceeds the number that was inflicted from the critical hit, the wound has been properly dressed and will heal in one-third the time normally required (see Table 2-6). It should be pointed out that even though the wound may be dressed properly, it still remains sore and tender leaving all penalties suffered from the wound intact until the appropriate amount of time has passed for it to have completely healed.

Herbalism and Healing

Knowledge of specific herbal remedies can assist in healing and even help prevent wounds from becoming more serious. The Knowledge (herbalism) or Profession (herbalist) skills grant a +2 synergy bonus to Heal skill checks when natural plants or herbs are used to treat an injured creature. Some plants, when used properly, will have specific effects on wounds, healing, and even the prevention of serious wounds. This is a short sampling of plants and herbs from the books Alchemy and Herbalists (Bastion Press) and Occult Lore (Atlas Games) that exhibit specific healing effects:

· Amaranth: Stops bleeding and hit point loss when applied to a wound as either a fresh poultice or when taken internally as a tea.

· Barley: Boil a dose with water and imbibe for immediate reduction of subdual damage by one point.

· Dittany: Decocted in ale or wine to clear the head or help resist the lingering effects of poisons (+1 to Fortitude saves against poisons for 1d8 hours) and regain 1d3 hp of subdual damage.

· Firesnap: Snap this root beneath the nose of an unconscious person (or slip a sliver of the dried root beneath the tongue) to give him a single temporary hit point for one minute in order to move him out of danger.

· Mandrake: The leaves must be chewed or rubbed against the skin, which will heal two points of subdual damage.

There will be instances where the use of a specific plant or herb will require a modifier to the Heal skill check other than the synergy bonus. Depending upon the exact circumstance and manner in which the plant is being used, Game Masters should not grant more than a +5 circumstance bonus to the skill roll.

New herbs and plants are great mechanisms to introduce new adventure hooks and plots. What follows is a list of new plants that may be used for healing purposes, preventive measures against wounds, and in some cases, intentional damage or injury (if used by less scrupulous individuals).

Black Walnut Lead

The walnut tree is most readily and easily identified by its distinctive fruit, which is a treasured delicacy among some nations. Walnut meat should be kept cool. It has a relatively short shelf life of three days, and loses its healing properties once dried.

Poultices made with crushed walnut meat are used in the treatment of burns. Creating such a salve requires a successful Profession (herbalist) skill roll (DC 10). If successful, it grants a +2 bonus to Heal checks when treating burns resulting from fire or heat damage (magical or non-magical).

Cost: 2 sp (5 doses); Weight: —

Dreamweed

Dreamweed grows only by still ponds in the deep forest, and is often found in regions frequented by the fey. It is a bright yellow weed that twines around the bushes at the edge of the water. Dreamweed pollen can be made into a paste. Anyone consuming this paste soon falls into a deep and healing sleep (Fortitude save DC 20 to resist) for several hours. During this time, the sleeper’s unconscious mind works to heal the body. The sleeper may add his Wisdom modifier to his hit points upon awakening. Dreamweed uses often report strange, vivid and occasional prophetic dreams. A single dose is sufficient for a night of rest.

Cost: 30 gp (1 dose – dried pollen); Weight: —

Fennel Root

Fennel is a tall, perennial weed with multiple stalks and topped by clusters of tiny flowers. It gives off the strong odor of licorice. Unless it is sealed in an airtight container, any character carrying fennel root is easily detected and may be tracked by creatures with the scent ability (+2 to Wisdom). Ingesting pure fennel oil can result in severe vomiting, leaving a character unable to attack, concentrate or cast spells for 1d4+1 rounds (Fortitude save DC 13 negates).

An ancient naturalist claimed that he noticed an amphibian rub against a fennel patch after shedding its skin, after which the beast’s clouded eyes became clear. Since then, extract of fennel root has been used to cure natural blindness and regenerate damaged eye tissue. Regularly drinking tea made with fennel root extract (requiring a Profession (herbalist) roll of DC 10 to prepare) eliminates the cumulative effects of aging on eyesight; in other words, saves are always made at DC 10. Normal aging resumes once regular consumption of the tea stops. If the extract is rubbed into the eyes of a character suffering from an eye wound, such as a torn cornea, retina or optic nerve, the character gets to make a Heal check with a +2 circumstance bonus for the extract.

Cost: 5 gp/dose; Weight: —

Ferrieleaf

A powerful stimulant, ferrieleaf is a small, stinging variety of nettle found in swamps and other waterlogged lowlands. The plant is tiny and difficult to find for anyone other than a trained herbalist or druid using either Survival or Knowledge (Herbalism) skill checks (DC 25).

A strong green tea can be brewed from a handful of ferrieleaves. Anyone drinking the tea gains the Alertness feat for 1d6 hours, but drinking ferrieleaf tea more than one a week causes illness (one point of temporary Constitution damage per dose of tea taken after the first in a given seven-day period).

A poultice of ferrieleaves may be prepared and placed on a wound. The potent stimulants in the leaves will instantly stabilize the injured character and heal 1d6 points of damage. However, 2d6 rounds after the poultice is applied, the strain on the character will cause an amount of damage equal to twice the amount healed. Ferrieleaves can give a fallen character a few moments of renewed vitality, but are no substitute for true healing. A handful of these leaves will make tea for up to four people or a single poultice.

Cost: 5 gp; Weight: —

Ja’gamm

This T-shaped purple mushroom grows only in arid sunlit areas. The ja’gamm must be handled delicately for its desiccated nature makes it quite fragile. The mushroom is prized for its ability to defend the body against poison. After ingestion of the plant’s cap (or head), a creature receives a +4 bonus to all poison saves made for the next six hours. (It is amusing how many wealthy socialites arrive at a rival’s dinner party munching on part of a ja’gamm.)

Cost: 10 gp/dose; Weight: —

Lammoset

Lammoset is a fungus that grows in sea-caves on the shore. It is a foul-smelling whitish growth found on the underside of salt-encrusted rocks. If boiled, a yellow liquid may be skimmed from the top. This liquid, known as Essence of Lammoset, greatly weakens and loosens joints if rubbed into the skin. Using the Essence inflicts 1d3 points of temporary Strength damage (Fortitude save DC 15). Once the lammoset has soaked into the character’s joints, all Heal checks related to setting bones or dislocations gain a +2 circumstance bonus. The character also gains a +2 enhancement bonus to Escape Artist checks. Once the temporary Strength loss heals, the bonuses from the lammoset vanish.

Raw lammoset is sold by the pound, whereas Essence of Lammoset is sold by the bottle. A single bottle contains enough extract for 6 treatments.

Cost: Raw – 5 sp; Essence – 5 gp; Weight: —

Spinevine Spore

These all too common tropical parasites are creeping vines know for their inch long yellow thorns and the swiftness of their germination. Found in nearly any hot, humid environment, these annoying plants have been known to cover trees or whole buildings in as swift a time as 3 days, a rate of growth that makes them an ever-present annoyance. But several tribes of jungle natives have found a particularly devious use for spinevines, or at least, the powdery green spore they constantly release.

Though the plant is of little use in the immediate tide of combat, the hot, wet depths of most creatures’ bodies simulate a spinevine’s preferred environment perfectly. Needing bone or muscle to take root upon, any hit made by a weapon coated in spinevine spore will not necessarily implant the parasite’s seed. Only piercing or slashing attacks that cause either a critical hit or deal 10 or more points of damage thrust deeply enough for a spore to take root within a victim. Any creature not immune to disease can be affected by spinevine spore and must make a Fortitude save (DC 18) to avoid infection. Failure indicates that the vine has found a suitable host and begins growing within them. After 5 hours of the spore’s insertion the host begins to take 1d4 damage per hour as the vine’s thorns pierce their bodily tissues. This damage cannot be healed normally or magically until the parasite is destroyed by either diminish plants, heal, remove disease, or a similar healing or plant blighting spell. Spores can also be removed within an hour of infection by a successful Heal check (DC 18) or by dealing at least 2 points of fire damage directly to the open wound.

Spinevine spores are only effective when used on piercing or slashing weapons, and even then only for one strike before they are blown or brushed away. As such, multiple darts, spears, and various forms of ammunition are most commonly coated in the powdered spore, being that its effects are unreliable at best. A vial of spores will coat 12 arrows, 3 daggers or one sword blade.

Cost: 25 gp (vial); Weight: —

Weltraise

Weltraise is derived from the weltwort, a rather grotesque perennial succulent which lives in damp and rocky soils, most commonly growing from cracks in mountain ledges, in certain swamps and in desert oases (where it is regarded as a hazard, given the number of deaths in livestock the mouth-welts can cause). It has surprisingly little odor until the plant itself is harmed, and the scent there is simply a hint of salt and iodine. This unfortunately means that many livestock in search of salt attempt to sample the weltwort and suffer its effects.

Weltwort plants are squat and fleshy, their misshapen, leaves and gnarled stems the color of a new bruise. Their leaves are thick and waxy and when bruised, their scent is a noxious blend best described as ‘similar to a mixture of rotting meat and skunk musk’.

When used as a blade poison, weltwort will render wounds aggravated and inflamed indefinitely until properly treated to heal its lesions. When used for scarification, the sap causes minor welts as soon as a minute after contact. In ten minutes, welts that will remain for days are guaranteed. Taken in the eyes or mouth, the damage is severe within a minute and will persist for some time. Burning-illstaunch salve is an alchemically created derivation, which acts instantly, with some risk to the patient.

Weltwort may be harvested at any time if proper care is taken. Typically, gloves of thick leather are the minimum. In orc tribes, slaves are invariably the gatherers of the weltwort and those forced to craft weltraise and weltraise blade resin.

Weltraise is considered barbaric in most civilized locales. If it is available, a jar of ten uses might sell for 500 gp. The sap keeps for up to three years if kept in a closed container, away from light and air. The blade resin is definitely illegal and costs at least 800 gp per dose if it can be had at all. Typically, weltraise is the province of certain thieves’ guilds and brotherhoods of assassins, with the exception of select torturers and scorned wives or consorts. A single application of weltraise sap will cover perhaps five square inches of skin. One dose of weltraise resin is sufficient for blades of small of medium size; the poison remains thin and has a tendency to run unless mixed with thicker additives. Tiny weapons may be envenomed at three per dose, small at two weapons per dose, and large or greater weapons require two or more doses. Burning-illstaunch salve can cost up to 1,000 gp/dose. Nonetheless, its reputation for curing disease and poison (even to lycanthropy and mummy rot!) make some willing to pay the price.

Weltraise sap is gelid, a translucent yellow, with a noxious scent, even when properly processed. It is a thin gel, usually applied with a stylus or brush of some sort. Weltraise resin is purplish, due to the boiling down of the stems and leaves with the sap to create it. Its scent is bitter, alkaline and reeks of decay. Weltraise Sap This gelid, viscid sap is astringent and caustic. If allowed to remain on flesh for one minute, a painful welt will rise, and is sure to leave a scar. If allowed to stand for ten minutes, the welt will be truly horrendous, raw and tender, and the scar will be quite obvious and thick. Orc and barbarian tribes use this for scarification, and crude tattooing, and if pigments are added to the sap, the scars will bear them when they form. The process is -quite- painful, and all DCs should increase by at least 3 due to the pain. The welts remain raw and painful for three days before beginning to scar. Through subtle variations in the mixture, colors may be varied in the final product, and the amount of scarring may be increased or reduced, or texture added. Application of weltraise sap does 1d4 points of subdual damage, or one point, if removed before one minute has elapsed.

If introduced into the eyes or mouth, weltraise sap acts as an acid, inflicting 1d6 hp of damage. If flushed before one minute has passed with large amounts of water, the subject receives only a +2 to DCs for Perception checks for 1d6 days as the abused eyes heal. In the mouth, the situation is more serious as the mouth, tongue and throat are left a mass of raw welts and lesions, often making it impossible for the unfortunate person or creature to eat. Livestock affected in this manner either starve or go mad with pain before healing, in the usual course of events. These welts persist for 1d4 weeks, though divine spells, which cure disease, will abate this if followed by a spell that heals injuries. If the damage is to the eyes, only cure blindness is needed. Weltraise sap is known among some tribes as ‘Wench’s Revenge’ due to the propensity some affronted orcish and barbarian females have for employing it on those who have wronged the lady in question. In the harems of the high desert, it’s known as ‘concubine’s tears’ for the many unfortunate newcomers who are too quick catch the eye of their owners. The displaced favorites they supplant have been known to drug such rivals, who wake to discover that their careers have come to a rather shocking end.

Weltraise blade resin

If the resin derived from weltwort is introduced in an open would via a piercing or slashing weapon, the ulcerations will bleed freely, regardless of whether the wound is bound. As a result, such wounds cause the bearer one point of temporary Dexterity and Constitution damage (Fortitude save DC 18) and a +2 penalty to all DCs until they heal, and an additional point of bleeding damage per ten minutes unless staunched with the proper salves or by cautery or magic (DC 25 to stop the bleeding with a Heal or Herbalism check. Simple cautery will inflict 1d4 points of damage, and requires a Heal check DC 12. If cautery is used the Dexterity damage inflicted by the wounds requires a Fort save at DC 18 to heal. Failure means that the damage and the scarring from the treatment has permanently impaired the subject). Hit points lost to such wounds will not heal naturally until the internal lesions are treated.

Burning-illstaunch salve

This alchemical and herbal medicament is something of a last resort for poisoned and/or septic or gangrenous wounds and limbs. It is difficult to craft, requiring 10 ranks in Heal and Craft (Alchemy) or Profession (Apothecary) (DC 30), but this acrid, purple-black salve permits the healer to take 10 or 20 on any Healing check to cure a non-magical disease or poison without expending additional time! In the case of ordinary diseases or poisons, a cure is automatic, but the penalty is severe: One point of Strength and Constitution damage are suffered. This damage is temporary and lasts a week due to damage done to the patient in the course of ‘burning out’ the disease or poison. A check is required to see if the damage is too extensive and becomes permanent. In the case of mummy-rot, the affected limb or flesh must be excised and the wound bathed in the salve at the point where the healthy flesh begins. In the case of lycanthropy, the salve is applied to the fresh wounds, or the old wounds reopened and the salve applied. (This only works within one day per point of Constitution bonus of the unfortunate infected victim.) In addition, the wounds burn diabolically as the salve eats at the exposed tissues: the victim must make a Fortitude save (DC 25) or lose two points each of temporary Strength, Dexterity and Constitution for one month. At the end of this time an additional DC 20 save is required to see if the damage is permanent. Wounds treated in this manner will bear raised scars of lumpy keloid tissue of a sickly purplish-gray hue, which may only be removed via regeneration or similar magic.

Treating Specific Wounds

Broken bones, deep lacerations, severed limbs and other serious traumas require a separate measure of attentiveness that more general wounds do not. Broken bones must be set, deep lacerations have a tourniquet applied and then stitched, severed limbs sewn back on and treated for potential infection, and so forth. Characters with ranks in Heal can make use of the skill to treat specifically wounded areas if they declare the intent and possess the necessary equipment (see Healing Equipment). For instance, an injured player suffering from a compound fracture of the arm requires a masterwork healer’s kit and a bone setting kit in order to be treated. Table 2-7 addresses the requirements of healing specific wounds and the DC modifier to be applied to the Heal attempt.

Table 2-7: Treating Specific Wound Types
Wound Type DC Modifier Required Equipment (Masterwork Healer’s kit plus below)
Broken Bone +6 Bone setting kit
Compound Fracture +8 Bone setting kit and Field medic kit
Concussion +4 Masterwork Healer’s kit only
Deep Laceration +4 Field medic kit or Surgical kit
Severed Limb +10 Surgical kit and Bone setting kit

Any attempt to treat a specific wound must be made independently of any other Heal checks (first aid, short-term care or long-term care). The attempt may only be made once and if successful, all further Heal checks on the injured patient gain a +4 competence bonus until he is restored to full health.

Magical Healing

Casting curative spells and drinking magical potions are the most common means of treating wounds in the typical fantasy campaign. Yet, these methods tend to focus only on the subject of hit point restoration and not how the wound itself is healed. For instance, if a fighter has a broken sword arm and the cleric in the party casts cure light wounds, is the broken arm healed completely or would the various cuts and bruises that he is bleeding from be healed first as a result of the limited power of the spell?

The effects of magical healing may fall into one of two schools of thought. First, magical healing affects and heals the minimal wounds (scratches, cuts, minor wounds) before mending the more severe wounds. At low levels, a character is unable to sustain a large number of non-critical wounds without risking death. At first level, a simple cure light wounds may bring a character from death’s door to potentially full health. In this situation, it may be safely assumed that healing occurs throughout the body. However, as the character advances in levels and gains more hit points, the amount of damage he can sustain increases proportionally. This means he can take a few sword cuts or rakes from a monster’s claws without dropping to the ground like a first-level mage. Because he is more advanced as a character, the practicality of the various cure spells becomes less relevant. A fighter with 65 hit points is less likely to benefit as much from a cure light wounds than one with only 15 hit points. When the fighter with more hit points does sustain a substantial amount of injury, the need for stronger cure spells becomes even more evident. Cure serious wounds and cure critical wounds become spells that are more important to the longevity of that fighter as opposed to cure light wounds or even cure minor wounds, which once were crucial when he was at low levels.

Second and more conversely, is that magic heals the more grievous wounds first, leaving the less urgent wounds to heal naturally. This mirrors the real life credence of assessment where a doctor would treat disease or poison first, followed by major damage and then minor damage. It is only logical to assume that a deity devoted to healing would grant spells that functioned in the same manner.

So how exactly does the magical healing process work and what effect do critical wounds have upon it? Healing spells must come from a divine source. When the spell takes effect, the injured character is briefly surrounded by an aura of positive healing energy, which varies in ambient color depending on the divine source of the spell. The consumption of healing potions produces a similar result without the divine aura. In both cases, the patient feels an exhilarating rush of warmth and pleasure as the magic takes hold and works to heal those areas in need that are to heal first.

According to the first school of thought, when a character experiences a critical wound, such as Thunderhead’s broken leg from the earlier example, the likelihood of the wound becoming fully healed with a single cure spell is marginal unless he is low level or a higher level cure spell is cast upon him. Since magical healing takes the form of affecting easily healed wounds first, Thunderhead may not have a mark on him but yet still be unable to walk because his leg has not knitted yet (or be partially knitted). Accelerated healing of critical wounds may very well require the casting of specialized spells that target those areas (see Healing Spells). Once healed, Thunderhead is then able to walk without pain and penalty unless he has other wounds which prevent him from doing so.

Using the above example and the second school of thought regarding healing spells would indicate that Thunderhead’s broken leg would be the primary recipient of the curative magic, followed by his other wounds. Casting a cure moderate wounds spell upon his broken leg would heal only the bone and not grant any additional hit point rejuvenation. The use of higher-level curative spells would heal both the bone and provide additional healing in the form of hit points, but not to the degree that would normally occur had Thunderhead not suffered a moderate critical wound. Table 2-8 shows the level of critical wound healing that occurs with the various cure spells in addition to the amount of hit points the spell may restore. A critical wound or broken bone may also be cured magically through the spells heal critical injuries and heal broken bones (see Healing Spells). Healing potions work in the exact manner as the spells used to create them regarding critical wounds.

Table 2-8: Curative Spells and Critical Healing
Cure minor wounds Cure light wounds Cure moderate wounds Cure serious wounds Cure critical wounds Heal
Cannot heal critical wounds Heals mild critical effects only Heals mild critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 1d8 hp +1 per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 2d8 +1 hp per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 8 hp per caster level (max. 150)
  Cannot heal moderate critical effects Heals moderate critical effects only Heals moderate critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals moderate critical effects + 1d8 hp +1 per caster level Heals moderate critical effects + 6 hp per caster level (max. 150)
    Cannot heal serious critical effects Heals serious critical effects only Heals serious critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals serious critical effects + 4 hp per caster level (max. 150)

Healing and Scarring

In real life, when you sustain an injury that breaks the skin, there is a real likelihood that it will leave a permanent scar unless proper care is taken to keep the wound clean and ointments are applied to aid healing. This is especially true if the wound is the result of a jagged laceration or tear in the skin and muscle tissue. The size of the wound also plays a significant role in scarring with larger wounds resulting in a higher probability of leaving a telltale scar. Other forms of injury such as burns from heat or chemicals also are likely to leave scarring after the wound has healed.

In the fantasy world of role-playing, the presence of scars is not typically a topic that is dealt with except when players are describing the physical appearance of their character and wish to point out a scar as a means of identification. But when you consider the type of career an adventurer chooses and the dangers he faces, it only stands to reason that he will likely have several battle scars to show as testaments to his encounters with monsters and enemy races. While many times that adventurer will sustain large amount of hit point damage, generally, it is only when he is subjected to a critical hit or is subjected to a large amount of damage at one time that when scarring may occur.

Examination of the levels of damage that critical hits may lead to gives a good indication as to the type of scarring and the size and severity of the scars themselves. Mild injuries sustained from such hits will likely leave small but noticeable scars while Moderate level injuries lead to clearly visible scars but still reasonable in size or girth. Serious scarring, however, is the direct result of catastrophic critical hits and will leave jagged, ugly scars despite magical healing. Scarring may also be determined from the percentage of damage inflicted upon a character in regards to his total hit points.

To ascertain whether a particular wound leaves a scar, roll 1d20 and add the appropriate modifiers from Table 2-9. If the total result of the roll exceeds a DC 20 then scarring has occurred. A natural roll of 20 indicates that the player has miraculously healed without scarring regardless of the total modifiers. The amount of scarring would be dependent upon the type of wound and is left to the Gamemaster’s discretion for specifics.

Table 2-9: Scarring Modifiers
Degree of damage incurred Scar Modifier Charisma Skill Modifier
1 – 20% loss of total hit points in a single attack +1
21 – 40% loss of total hit points in a single attack +3 -1
41 – 60% loss of total hit points in a single attack +5 -2
61 – 80% loss of total hit points in a single attack +7 -3
81 – 100% loss of total hit points in a single attack +10 -4
Mild critical wound +3 -1
Moderate critical wound +5 -2
Serious critical wound +10 -4

Scarring may also affect those skills that are Charisma-based. Depending on the percentage of hit points that are lost in a single attack and whether a critical wound is involved, a maximum penalty of -8 could be attached to all Charisma-based skill checks. Hiding or physically covering the scars, or even using magical means to remove them, such as remove scars, may negate the penalties incurred from scarring at the GM’s discretion.

Scarring may also have an influence on Intimidate skill checks. If a character has a highly visible scar that results in a Charisma-based skill penalty, he may add one-half the penalty (rounded down) in the form of a circumstance bonus to all Intimidate skill checks.

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Some cultures or races may deem scars to be symbolic of certain rituals or rites of passage. Barbarian tribes and those similar to the races and cultures in the Nyambe campaign setting are characteristic of this behavior and attitude. If a character hails from such a culture where scars are prominent and openly displayed as a symbol of prowess or manhood, the Charisma skill modifiers should not be applied when interacting with members of his own culture or those who have regular dealings with that culture. The modifiers should, however, be applied to any encounter requiring a Charisma-based skill check with individuals not familiar with that character’s culture.

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Healing and Shapechanging

The ability to shapeshift through natural or magical means can have a great effect upon the healing of wounds. Lycanthropes and other natural shapechangers have long been able to heal many a wound through the simple act of altering their form. The same may be said with magical transmutation spells that allow a character to alter his form, such as polymorph or shapechange.

Creatures who are capable of altering their form may gain back a certain amount of hit points dependent upon the source of the shapechange. Table 2-10 outlines the benefits gained when a character undergoes a change in form.

Table 2-10: Shapechanging Benefits
Source of shapechange Benefit received
Alter self 1d2 hit point per HD or character level
Animal shapes 1d2+1 hit point per HD or character level
Baleful polymorph 1d3 hit point per HD or character level
Beast shape 1d3+1 hit point per HD or character level
Gaseous form 1d4 hit points per HD or character level
Iron body Number of hit points equal to Con modifier x2 per HD or character level
Polymorph Number of hit points equal to Con modifier per HD or character level
Polymorph any object Number of hit points equal to Con modifier per HD or character level
Shapechange 1d6+1 hit points per HD or character level
Alternate Form (Su) 4 hit points per HD or character level
Alter Self (Su) 2 hit point per HD or character level

Creatures that are particularly vulnerable to certain kinds of weapons (lycanthropes and silver or holy weapons and vampires, for instance) do not heal damage caused by those weapons when they shapechange.

Acupuncture and Healing

Acupuncture is the practice of physically triggering certain points (acupuncture points) on the body in order to stimulate healing, reduce pain, treat poison, cure addiction, and balance the body. Rather than using traditional medicine, you may allow characters to pursue the science of acupuncture to determine the success of a character’s Heal skill check. Unless you are playing in an oriental setting, the practice of acupuncture is considered contradictory to traditional medical techniques. While the results of acupuncture are determined by heal skill checks, it is suggested that characters practicing acupuncture be unable to use traditional healing techniques and vice versa. A character that wishes to able to switch between the two practices of medicine should only be allowed to do so at the cost of a feat. In essence, the character gains a “Heal (acupuncture)” or “Heal (traditional)” feat depending on the campaign.

Acupuncture should require training and characters attempting to practice acupunctural techniques without training risk injuring their patients. Anytime an acupuncturist fails his Heal skill check by a value greater than his Heal skill ranks he injures his patient, causing them 1d2 hit points of damage. Upon a critical failure, the damage to the patient increases to 1d6 hp and the acupuncturist must make a Dexterity check (DC 15 +1d10) or irreparably damage one of his needles.

Acupuncture is more versatile than traditional medicine. In addition to the typical tasks one can accomplish using the Heal skill, an acupuncturist can also perform the following tasks.

Pain Reduction Treatment

When performed successfully, this treatment allows a character to ignore the effects of extreme pain allowing him to remain conscious until he has been reduced to –2 hit points. Successful treatment lasts for 1 hour per the acupuncturists Heal skill rank. Performing this treatment takes 15 minutes and has a DC of 20.

Reduce Fatigue

Using this technique, a successful treatment reduces some of the negative effects of fatigue. A treated character is still fatigued and requires rest for full recovery; however he can function normally until that time. Should the character engage in an activity that would cause fatigue, he is immediately exhausted. Performing this treatment takes 15 minutes and has a DC of 25.

Reduce Exhaustion

Using this technique, a successful treatment reduces some of the negative effects of exhaustion. A treated character is still exhausted and requires rest for full recovery; however he can function as if he is exhausted. Should the character engage in an activity that would cause fatigue, he is immediately exhausted and suffers 1d4 points of subdual damage. Performing this treatment takes 30 minutes and has a DC of 25.

Purifying Treatment

Acupuncture is quite effective in the treatment of non-magical diseases, addictions, poisons, and other toxins. So long as he is using his needles, an acupuncturist gains a +2 competence bonus when treating such afflictions. Treatment takes a number of minutes equal to the DC of the afflicting toxin; therefore, the results of any secondary damage are not determined until the treatment fails. In other words, for the duration of the treatment, the acupuncturist battles the secondary effects until either he or the toxin wins. It also requires the use of moxa (see Healing Equipment).

Blindness/Deafness Treatment

Provided the damage to either a patient’s eyes or ears is temporary or psychological in nature (the eardrums are still intact or the eyes are still in their sockets), an acupuncturist can attempt to restore them to normal. This treatment takes 90 minutes and has a DC of 35. It also requires the use of moxa.

Balance Treatment

This treatment is used to balance the patient by allowing the acupuncturist to temporarily manipulate ability scores. A successful Heal skill check (DC40) allows the acupuncturist to borrow one point from the patient’s highest ability score and move it to a lower score of his choice. The treatment takes 60 minutes to perform and last for a number of hours equal to 1/2 the acupuncturist’s Heal skill ranks. It also requires the use of moxa.

Acupuncturists are dependent upon their tools, without them, they are inefficient. An acupuncturist gains no advantage from using needles (such as one does from the use of a healer’s kit) and suffers a –4 circumstance penalty when attempting to treat patients without them. The exception to this rule is applied to stabilizing dying characters, which can be performed using acupressure (the use of touch pressure on acupuncture points). Acupuncture is also time consuming and requires concentration. Using acupuncture to perform a standard Heal check requires a number minutes equal to the Heal skill DC. The duration of specific treatments are listed above. Like spellcasters, acupuncturists that are disturbed while providing treatment must succeed at a Concentration skill check or the treatment automatically fails.

Healing Equipment

Treating an injury can make all the difference if a character has the right equipment. Many items offer additional bonuses to Heal skill checks or serve to assist in treatment of the wound in some manner.

Table 2-11: Healing Equipment
Item Cost Weight
Acupuncture Needles 50 gp; 150 gp (masterwork) 1 lb.
Aftereat Mint 1,000 gp
Animate Goo 350 gp
Bone Crank 30 gp 1 lb.
Bone Setting Kit 200 gp 5 lbs.
Bone Tonic 50 gp ¼ lb.
Bracers of Healing 100 gp (single bracer) ½ lb.
Bronze Model 1,000 gp 250 lbs.
Compression Bandage 2 sp ¼ lb.
Copper Biomagnets 10 sp ½ lb.
Delryn’s Limb-lock Salve 1,000 gp
Delryn’s Quick-fix Balm 90 gp ¼ lb.
Delryn’s Troll-draught 1500 gp; 4000 gp (horn) — ; ¼ lb. (horn)
Delryn’s Unguent of Perservation 50 gp ½ lb.
Delryn’s Wake-up Oil 20 gp
Distillate of Stone 50 gp
Drawing Salve 1 gp
Field Medic Kit 200 gp 2 lbs.
Fortified Soup 2 sp
Hollow Teeth 50 gp
Ice Maiden 500 gp 50 lbs.
Kremm 50 gp
Leeches 2 sp
Medicinal Alcohol 3 sp
Moxa 5 gp
Poisonbane wafers 350 gp
Sizeable Splint 5 gp 2.5 lbs.
Smuggler’s Eye 100 gp; 300 gp (masterwork)
Surgical Kit 700 gp 8 lbs.
Venom Flush 20 gp

Acupuncture Needles

A set of acupuncture needles consists of an assortment of 30 specially shaped needles. Common sets are typically made of stone and pottery, but masterwork sets are made from bronze, silver, or even gold. Each set contains nine basic types of needles, their uses ranging from superficial pricking, to puncturing veins, to pressing and massaging. The following basic shaped needles are found in every kit: an arrowhead-shaped needle, a three-edged needle, a blade-like needle, a round needle, an extremely thin needle, long needle, a blunt needle, and a large needle. Unlike a healer’s kit, needles aren’t exhausted after a set amount of uses; however it is possible to damage a needle through incorrect use (see Acupuncture technique above). Should a set be reduced to less than 15 needles it becomes less effective and the acupuncturist suffers a –2 penalty to any Heal skill checks he attempts. If the kit is reduced to less than 7 needles, the penalty increases to –3. Needles are usually stored in wooden boxes, which also contain acupuncture charts and sometimes moxa herb sticks. Masterwork sets provide a +2 circumstance bonus to Heal checks.

Cost: common 50 gp, masterwork 150 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Aftereat Mint

Always a gracious host, the celebrated gnome gourmet Sir Tilbert Ponsonby-Smythe (‘Tuppy’ to his friends) commissioned these thin, mint-flavored squares as an after dinner nibble following a dinner party during which several of the guests found that the lingering taste of their meal not only prevented them from enjoying the hot beverages that followed, but caused them severe digestive problems later in the evening. Handed around after meals, the mints are a great boon in relieving indigestion, heartburn, and all other digestive problems including nausea. The mints were a huge success, and he took to carrying a box of them to every occasion he attended, as well as a supply on hand at his home. Eventually they came to feature at every gathering of revelers, and thus found their way into more common use amongst adventurers, who appreciated the mints use in defeating nausea and certain poisons.

Each mint is a thin square roughly 1 and a half inches on each side and about an eighth of an inch thick. The most popular variety has a thin coating of chocolate to sweeten the taste. Upon consumption, the mint causes any digestive problems to be neutralized, including any ingested poisons and nausea, and provides immunity to the same for one hour. A person can only benefit from the mints once per 24 hours; any additional mints consumed will merely be an aid to fresh breath.

The mints are only ever sold in boxes, and command a high price due to their reputation in wealthy society.

Cost: 1,000 gp (1 box of 12 mints); Weight: —

Animate Goo

This yellowish-green alchemical goo has a slickly sticky gelatinous feel to it. The goo is usually held in a small vial and must be lathered over the wrist of a host as well as a hand removed from a humanoid undead skeleton that has been destroyed no more than 1 week prior. The goo will bind the skeleton’s hand to the new host and will thereafter be treated as a normal hand. Concoction of this substance requires a successful Craft (Alchemy) skill check (DC 25).

Skeleton’s hands are more agile, not having to deal with the restrictions of flesh and it provides a +1 circumstance bonus to disable device, open locks, and pick pockets. Unfortunately, special gauntlets need to be custom made in order to provide additional padding for the hand. The goo may only be used to attach a hand. No other body part will be successful.

Cost: 350 gp (1 dose); Weight: —

Bone Crank

The bone crank straightens twisted and sprained limbs. The device resembles nothing so much as a small rack. A thick rope is tied around the end of the injured limb, and a crank is turned that pulls the limb straight. If the injury is due to dislocation or sprain, it can be quickly cured using a bone crank. However, if the bone is broken, the crank can do more harm than good. An injury can be assayed by making a Heal check (DC 15) to determine if it can be treated with a bone crank. If successful, the crank may heal 1d4 points of damage. Otherwise, using the crank will inflict 1d4 points damage as it further injures the limb and bone.

Cost: 30 gp.; Weight: 1 lb.

Bone Setting Kit

This kit contains items needed for setting both compound and regular bone fractures. A typical kit will have a bone crank, bone-set moss, compression bandages, sizeable splint, and various useful herbs. Use of a bone setting kit provides a +2 circumstance bonus to Heal checks when dealing with fractures.

Cost: 200 gp; Weight: 5 lbs.

Bone Tonic

This pale yellow cream must be rubbed over the entire body. The alchemical substance seeps into the bloodstream, strengthening and fortifying the skeletal structure. For a period of 1d6 hours afterwards all bones in the body have a hardness equivalent to that of iron (10) making it nearly impossible to suffer broken bones. Manufacture of this substance requires a successful Craft (alchemy) check (DC 25).

Cost: 50 gp (flask); Weight: ¼ lb.

Bracers of Healing

Tired of being hit every time she reached for healing during a battle, traveling warrior Kalinthor Redthorne, with the help of a gnomish alchemist, developed the Bracers of Healing. By outward appearance they appear to be simple leather bracers, but within each can be found four slim compartments, each large enough to hold one single dose of a potion.

A small catch at one end of each compartment breaks the seal and pierces the skin of the wearer, injecting the contained liquid and allowing the wearing to benefit without the need to fumble in their packs, saving valuable time. Hitting the catch is a free action that requires a Dexterity check (DC12). If the check fails the wearer has fumbled and provokes an attack of opportunity. After use, the bracers need to be cleaned and re-filled before they can be used again.

Unscrupulous assassins have been known to turn this device against its owner by replacing the contents in one or more of the compartments with something rather more deadly.

Cost: 100 gp (single bracer); Weight: ½ lb.

Bronze Model

A bronze model is a life-size, masterwork statute of a human used for training and testing acupuncturists. The statue itself is hollow and surface is perforated by hundreds of tiny holes (354 to be exact), which represent all the various acupuncture points. Before it is used as a training device, the model is sealed with wax and filled with water. A student is given a needle and then the name of a point. If the needle is incorrectly inserted, the seal is broken and the student is soaked, thus a student who remains dry after inserting his needle has hit his mark.

Students who successfully complete a study of acupuncture at a school that uses a bronze model gains an additional +2 competency bonus to all Heal skill checks when using acupunctural techniques. Attending a school that specializes in the use of bronze models requires approximately one year of intermittent training (40 hours of study per month) and costs anywhere from 5 to 20 gp per month, depending on the school’s reputation.

Cost: 1,000 gp Weight 250 lbs

Bronze Model: hardness 6; hp 20

Compression Bandage

These strips of cloth wrap around the wound and use force to slow or halt bleeding. A compression bandage adds a +2 circumstance bonus to all Heal checks involving a bleeding wound.

Cost: 2 sp; Weight: ¼ lb.

Copper Biomagnets

Copper biomagnets are small bracelet shaped bands of copper that, depending upon their length, can be bent around different parts of the body to increase blood-flow and stimulate healing of injuries. Their primary use is to treat the negative effects on injuries to specific parts of the body (injuries that cause skill check penalties). When a biomagnet is placed on or near the area that suffered specific damage, it grants a +1 bonus to Heal skill checks to treat it and decreases the recovery time to half. An appropriately placed biomagnet also provides a +1 bonus to any Fortitude saves made to ignore injury penalties by “toughing them out”. The effects of multiple biomagnets in a single area do not stack.

Multiple biomagnets can also be used during injury recovery. A patient wearing a set of eight or more magnets on key circulation points can increase his natural healing rate by 1.5 times as many hit points as a normal recovery. Proper use of multiple biomagnets requires a Heal skill check (DC 20). A typical copper biomagnet has a 4-inch diameter and may be used for 30 days before it becomes demagnetized and worthless.

Cost: 10 gp; Weight: 1/2lb.

Delryn’s Limb-lock Salve

One of Delryneth Morbannaon’s most praised alchemical creations; Limb-lock Salve has saved many a wounded combatant from permanent maiming with its fantastic properties. A distillation of pure troll blood which is then mixed with powdered troll’s teeth and certain fungi, this sticky, charcoal gray paste is designed to be applied to the stump of a severed limb to allow a quick, yet painful, re-attachment.

The salve must be applied within a number of minutes equal to the patient’s Constitution score after the limb was severed, and the limb to be reattached must be pressed against the stump within one minute of the application or the salve is rendered ineffective. Multiple applications of the salve can extend this time by one and a half minutes per additional application. Once the limb has been pressed to the coated stump, it must remain held in place for 4d6 minutes whilst the tissues and bone meld themselves together. If the limb is removed from the stump for any reason during this time, the attempt fails and a new application of limb-lock salve must be applied if a new attempt is to be made. The reattachment process is quite painful for the patient, and requires a Fortitude save at a DC of 10 plus 1 per minute of the process. Failure results in the patient taking two points of non-lethal damage for each minute of the process.

Limb-lock Salve is often sold with an adjustable clamp designed to hold the limb in place during the reattachment. The clamp causes two points of non-lethal damage when applied, but prevents the limb from being moved and ruining the reattachment process, thereby reducing the time by four minutes to a minimum of one.

Cost per dose: 1,000 gp; Weight: —

Clamp: 25gp

Delryn’s Quick-fix Balm

This thick, vile-smelling, green-black paste was the first of notable elven herbalist Delryneth Morbannaon’s range of troll-based alchemical concoctions. Delryn had been experimenting with various creatures known to have accelerated healing properties when he hit upon the idea of using trolls to create non-magical healing substances that could be used by even the most unskilled warrior. By adding a solution of troll’s blood to certain well-known healing herbs, he created a viscous paste which, when smeared onto a wound, was absorbed into the patient’s bloodstream and granted a very limited form of the troll’s famed regenerative properties. From this initial success, Delryn went on to create several more troll-based substances, and his name became a by-word on the battlefields and amongst those unlucky enough to require the aid of his discoveries. Many a scarred veteran owes his life to a timely application of a Delryn Morbannaon product.

Once applied, the patient gains regeneration 1 for 1d4+1 rounds, and any bleeding effects (such as from a wounding weapon) are negated. This item, whilst less potent and slightly more expensive than a cure light wounds potion, is prized by seasoned campaigners since it continues to function even when magic is disrupted. Each pot contains enough balm for three applications

Cost per pot:90 gp; Weight: ¼ lb.

Delryn’s Troll-draught

This thick, foul-smelling liquid is little more than pure troll-blood, mixed with strongly spiced but weak ale and finely ground healing herbs, slowly distilled over months until it resembles a shot of pure black of liquor. Discovered almost by accident when Delryn left a solution of his quick-fix balm heating for too long, this incredibly potent brew is sold in either single vials or capped drinking horns, each horn holding enough for three doses.

Upon consumption, the patient feels a surge of heat throughout their body and a crawling sensation in their stomach as the troll blood is assimilated into their system. One round after consumption, the imbiber gains regeneration 3 for 1+1d4 minutes. Because of its foul smell and taste, anyone consuming Troll-draught must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). Failure causes them to retch up the mixture, and they receive only regeneration 1 for 1+1d4 minutes.

Cost: 1,500 gp (vial) ; Weight: —

Cost: 4,000 gp (horn); Weight: ½ lb.

Delryn’s Unguent of Preservation

This semi-transparent, grey-green goo has a slightly sticky, gelatinous feel to it, and is cool to the touch. Distilled from troll blood and the oils of certain plants, it is designed to help preserve severed limbs until they can be re-attached by preventing decomposition. Each pot holds enough unguent to cover a single, human adult-sized leg, or two human adult-sized arms.

Once the goo has been applied to the limb, it triples the length of time the flesh will take to decompose, allowing greater leeway in the application of healing magic or other regenerative items such as Delryn’s Limb-lock salve.

Although the goo is slightly sticky, it can be wiped away with relative ease, and most users of this substance prefer to cover the affected limb up after treatment to prevent accidental removal of the unguent. For that reason, most places that sell Unguent of Preservation also sell Preservation Caskets. These lightweight wooden boxes are sealed inside with wax, and are designed to hold a solution of the goo mixed with water (in a 1 to 1 ratio) in which the lost limb can be suspended for safe transport. Each casket requires double the amount of Unguent for the limb, but doubles the preservation time (for a total of six times the usual decomposition time). The caskets are air-tight once sealed, and fully lockable. They must be carefully cleaned out and the solution replaced after each use.

Unguent of Preservation (1 pot): 50 gp ; Weight: ½ lb.

Preservation Casket (human arm): 60 gp; Weight: 3 lbs.

Preservation Casket (human leg): 100 gp; Weight: 5 lbs.

Preservation casket (with solution): Casket cost x2

Delryn’s Wake-up Oil

This oily mixture, made from the distilled bodily oils of the troll and herbal extracts, is designed to be smeared upon the body of a dying person, and is often used in prolonged battles to revive fallen comrades when more potent healing is unavailable, or to aid in retreat.

On contact with skin the oil is absorbed and begins to heal the patient at a rate of one hit point per round for 10 rounds, enough to bring back almost anyone from the very brink of death to full consciousness and limited mobility. It also numbs the body for the 10 rounds after the healing has ceased, allowing the patient to ignore the pain of their wounds and any penalties to rolls caused by pain alone.

Due to the herbal ingredients, wake-up oil can only be safely used once on a person in a 24 hour period. Any further applications will work, but will cause the patient to be exhausted after the duration of the numbness expires. The exhaustion lasts until the patient has rested for a full 8 hours.

Cost: 20 gp (vial); Weight: —

Distillate of Stone

Dwarven legends tell of the rain as it falls on the mountainside, running down through cracks and caverns and filtered through slabs of ancient stone. This rainwater then trickles through rock and drips down stalagmites into underground pools that have never seen daylight. On its long slow subterranean pilgrimage, the water absorbs much of the strength and resilience of the living stone.

Distillate of Stone is manufactured by adding some common herbs and fungi to mountain spring water. It is a bitter, bitter drink, but can have remarkable curative properties. Drinking distillate of stone doubles the character’s constitution modifier for the purposes of resisting poison and disease for 1d4 hours. If the constitution modifier is negative, it is still doubled – those who are weak will be made weaker by the harsh brew.

Cost: 50 gp (1 dose); Weight: —

Drawing Salve

Made from sheep or dog fat, this thick black paste is applied to any skin wound where an object remains embedded in it. The salve is applied liberally as a standard action. The skin dries, and thus contracts, so that whatever the foreign object is that plagues the body (a stinger, for example) is easily removable within 1d4+1 minutes of application. One dose covers a 1-inch radius of skin.

Cost: 1 gp/dose; Weight: —

Druid’s Pharmacopoeia

Druidical orders have always planted medicinal herbs and plants in their groves, so that they do not have to rely on their magic so often, and have developed many ways of using them that they have kept to themselves. Such plants are often more potent that what might be found or grown elsewhere, and are sometimes unique to these groves.

This pharmacopoeia is a compendium of such natural cures, palliatives, and preventatives. Most druid groves usually have one or two written copies, and new druids or rangers are taught from them, who are required to memorize it. The pharmacopoeia itself never leaves the grove. The contents are considered druidical secrets and are not to be shared among outsiders; for fear that they will over-harvest and exploit the natural bounty.

However, this copy was “obtained” from an absent-minded druid, who obviously had a wry sense of humor, and who wrote down everything he learned so that he could reference it later. It is obvious that some of what he has written is from his own observations. He even drew crude but serviceable drawings of the plants referenced. Copies of this book are never advertised for sale openly, but occasionally they may be obtained for the right price. Anyone caught with a copy of this book by the druids or their followers could face quick punishment, or simply confiscation of the book, so anyone possessing it should take care to keep it safely hidden from wary eyes.

Game application: Anyone possessing a copy of this book can add a +8 circumstance bonus to their Heal, Knowledge (nature) or Profession (herbalist) checks.

Bone-set moss

This dark green, tightly-woven, heavily matted moss is used primarily to stabilize broken bones in the limbs of men and animals alike. It more than replaces the more cumbersome splints and casts that are often used by other healers. Bone-set moss can be found in any season. Since it is only found in dark, damp areas at the base of large trees, it is difficult to find in serviceable amounts. When harvested and immediately wrapped around a broken limb, then quickly heated over a slow flame, the outer layer of dry, woody brown roots dries to a toughness resembling old leather, while the interior remains soft and springy. The result is a tight but comfortable binding that acts as a cast to encourage bone repair.

In addition, the surface of the moss contains a mild analgesic and antiseptic. This alleviates the itching and the temptation to scratch that often accompanies other casts. Unless kept constantly moist, the moss will dry out and flake away within 12 to 14 days. That is usually enough time for most bone breaks to be well on their way to healing, requiring no more than a simple binding.

Game application: Bone-set moss acts as well as any cast in protecting and assisting broken limbs but is rare and hard to find. A Knowledge (nature) check (DC 20) is required to locate a piece large enough to be serviceable; the check is DC 15 if the area searched is a druid grove, with the permission of the druids. It takes five minutes and a Healing check (DC 15) to properly use bone-set moss.

A failed Healing check may be repeated once with the same piece of bone-set moss; a second failure renders that particular piece of moss unusable. The healer must also make a second Healing check (DC 15) or inflict another 1d4 points of damage.

Cost: 100 gp per square yard.

Bitterleaf Tea

Taken just before entering battle, this bitter tasting tea is brewed, not from the leaves (as the name would imply) but the bark of the Bitterleaf tree, and once brewed may be drunk hot or cold as the user wishes, though it only remains potent for 48 hours after brewing. The dark brew induces a state of extreme rage in the imbiber shortly after it is drunk, and was made famous by a certain clan of halflings who became known for their fierce berserker warriors. It can be bought fresh as a liquid, or packets of the shredded bark can be carried and brewed when needed simply by adding boiling water and allowing steeping for 1 minute.

Game Application: 1d3 rounds after drinking the tea, the user enters a Barbarian Rage, with all the effects thereof (including fatigue once the effect ends), which lasts for 6 rounds per dose of tea drunk. He cannot, however, voluntarily end this effect, and should he run out of foes before the effect ends must make a will save at DC 15 +2 per dose of tea imbibed within the last hour to avoid attacking the nearest creature.

The tea is quite addictive, and anyone who consumes more than one dose in a four hour period will find themselves craving the liquid, suffering a -2 morale penalty to all attacks, skill checks and saves until they can get their next ‘fix’. This craving will subside if the user refrains from drinking the tea for 48 hours.

Note: If a barbarian drinks Bitterleaf Tea, he does not need to make a Will save to avoid attacking non-foes as he is already used to making the distinction between enemy and friend whilst raging.

Cost: 250 gp per dose; 1,000 gp per packet (dry tea, 5 doses)

Bitterroot

Bitterroot is a thick, syrupy decoction, brewed from the roots of several common and uncommon medicinal plants. It is a common enough formulation that most alchemists and hedge witches are familiar with its creation. Bitterroot can last indefinitely in sealed containers, but if exposed to air, it will quickly dry out and turn into a hard, brown, tarry substance.

The herbal remedy carries an appropriate name, for it possesses a very bitter, cloying taste that overpowers any other taste for several minutes afterward. The bitter taste is difficult to remove without diluting the curative properties or removing them all together. It is highly recommended that brewing be done in a remote and isolated area, as the smell quickly assumes a bitter aroma, reminiscent of the taste.

Bitterroot has three effects: first, it will neutralize any ingested natural (organic, but not inorganic or magical) poisons if taken within five minutes of ingesting the poison. Secondly, it has the beneficial side effect of killing any and all internal parasites in the digestive system. Thirdly, it is a potent emetic.

Druids have also found that bitterroot is a sovereign hangover cure, although the taste may be considered so vile that most afflicted with a hangover would prefer the hangover to the cure.

Game application: The first effect of bitterroot takes place immediately, the second within 2d4 rounds, and the third within 1d4 minutes of ingestion. The hangover cure also takes 2d4 rounds to effect. It takes two weeks and a single Knowledge (nature) check (DC 25) to find all of the ingredients, and a day’s brewing to create 1d4 doses. The intense bitterness means that it is a difficult challenge to drink. Anyone drinking it for the first time must make a Will save (DC 15) in order stand drinking it. Of course, one’s friends can always assist, usually forcibly.

Cost: 250 gp per dose.

Numbneedles

Numbneedle bushes are often used to guard druid groves, and so they were created with the intent that they are difficult to distinguish from other thorny bushes. However, they have managed to escape the bounds of the druid groves, and are now found scattered throughout the forests.

The thorns of these bushes have a powerful anesthetic effect on any limb they scratch. It is not uncommon to find intruders lying beside the thick brush, their limbs numb and useless for hours. A far more benevolent fate than what is normally given to unwelcome intruders.

Properly and most carefully harvested, numbneedle thorns can be used to anesthetize limbs prior to major surgery or amputation. Usage is simple: the numbneedle thorn is jabbed into the skin near the wound, which removes all feeling from the surrounding area for up to two or three hours. The process may be repeated at any time without harm, but the effects do not accumulate: the effect lasts only for the few hours since the most recent application. Once harvested, numbneedles quickly dry and become brittle, remaining effective for only 2 to 3 days.

Unfortunately for the more militant members of druidic orders, numbneedle thorns are not particularly aerodynamic, nor are they very sturdy. Attempts to use them as blowgun darts or other projectile weapons have proven frustratingly futile. Attempts to prepare arrow venoms from the thorns have also proven futile.

In addition to their use within surgery, there have been reports that, among lesser-civilized brethren, numbneedles are used to confine prisoners and to ensure cooperation in the preparation of live sacrifices.

Game application: Numbneedles anesthetize limbs, affecting an area approximately 6″ in diameter. It affects both surface feeling and underlying musculature. Any attempt to harvest numbneedles requires a Knowledge (nature) check (DC 25) to locate and identify them, and a Dexterity check (DC 20) to harvest them without getting scratched. Numbneedles seem to have an uncanny ability to locate and scratch unprotected flesh. The thorns are tough enough to pierce soft or thin leather, and anything more protective, such as a metallic gauntlet, will prove to be too restrictive to harvest them correctly. Numbneedles require a Healing check (DC 15) to use correctly. An unsuccessful check indicates a failure to affect the intended area of effect. Freshly harvested numbneedles require one round to take effect; older ones require 1d3 rounds.

Cost: 10 gp per needle.

Paindull

This rare herb, when chewed raw, causes the user’s nerves to be dulled, allowing them to withstand vast amounts of pain, though reckless users can often succumb to wounds they are unaware of taking.

Game Application: The herb takes effect two rounds after being consumed, and the effects last for one hour. The user is immune to all pain related effects, shrugging off wounds that would stop a normal man in his tracks; he may continue to act normally until reaching -6 or fewer hit points. However, due to the numbing effect, the user is less aware of the nature of his wounds, and may not notice those that should be attended to; whilst under the effect of Paindull, the GM must secretly keep track of the user’s hit point total, and should only make general statements about how the user looks without revealing the amount of damage taken. This lasts until the effect ends or the user succumbs to his wounds. A neutralize poison effect will end the numbness prematurely.

In addition, due to the numbness the user suffers a -2 penalty to all dexterity related skills and checks.

Cost: 30 gp per leaf

Cost: 600 gp per packet (25 doses)

Cost: 1,000 gp per pouch (40 doses)

Slumberweed

A tall plant with heavy golden flowers, it is most usually found by tracking honey bees. It is most often found in wet, open areas close to heavy forests. A perennial bloom, it is often found in dense patches of varying degrees of germination. Once harvested, it is dried, and will keep indefinitely.

Slumberweed is often used to prepare a patient for serious surgery. When used properly, it casts the patient into a deep sleep, reminiscent of the arcane spell sleep. However, slumberweed has been proven effective on all forms of living beings, especially ones that have proven immune to the previously mentioned spell.

To use, a patient is given one or more stalks of slumberweed to chew, and must swallow its juices. It has a surprisingly pleasant, sweetish taste. After a few minutes, the patient will fall asleep, and will remain in that state for approximately ten minutes per stalk of slumberweed consumed. Once asleep, the patient must be continuously monitored and attended by a healer until they awaken, in the off chance that the patient may suffer some form of trauma while asleep. There are no known and safe methods to awaken someone under the effect of slumberweed.

Slumberweed juice has been found to make disappointingly poor arrow or blade venom. It appears that some interaction with the saliva of the patient is what encourages its efficacy.

However, owing to its sweetish taste, slumberweed has recently been adopted by criminal elements as a bloodless means of obtaining access to guarded area. There are stories of guards being offered sweetened slumberweed stalks, with obvious conclusions.

One of the properties of slumberweed is the propensity of the user to mumble and babble while asleep. Some druid factions have taken the babblings to be prophetic pronouncements, while others have conducted interrogations of individuals under the effects of slumberweed, but likely their words are as random as the rolls of dice, and not to be taken seriously.

Game application: Slumberweed puts an individual into a deep slumber, from which they will awaken after sleeping ten minutes per whole stalk chewed; if they choose, they may make a Fortitude check at DC 15 +2 for each additional stalk chewed, to stay awake. Slumberweed requires a Knowledge (nature) skill check (DC 20) to locate 1d6 ripe stalks. Slumberweed requires a Healing check (DC 20) at its first use, and an additional check (DC 10) is required every ten minutes after, until the patient awakens. A failure indicates that there has been an overdose or other trauma. Treat as an ingested poison (Fortitude save DC 13), with an initial 1d3 temporary Constitution damage and 1d6 secondary temporary Constitution damage. The user has a 50% chance to begin speaking about whatever they are thinking of or dreaming of while asleep. Some people may find this quite embarrassing.

Cost: 5 gp per stalk.

Silversheen

Silversheen is a parasitical plant that prefers the rough bark of oak trees. It is quite rare, yet protected by its anonymity. During the day and most nights, it is barely seen against the bark of the oaks, yet under the direct light of the full moon, a silvery frond blooms to meet the moonlight. It is said that the power of the silversheen comes from the moon itself.

Silversheen blooms may be harvested only under the light of a full moon and then preserved in spirits of grain for up to a full year. After that year, the blooms will dissolve, and the remaining spirits may be used as a sovereign antiseptic. When placed on a healing wound of no more than 2-3″ in length immediately after suturing or other treatment, silversheen blossoms will entirely eliminate potentially disfiguring scars. For longer wounds, more silversheen blossoms may be used. This is important in areas where scar tissue would interfere with the proper development of callouses, such as on the hands or feet. It is not widely known that callouses will not grow over scar tissue, so silversheen is especially prized by warriors or archers who have suffered scarring injuries to their hands. It is also sought by bards and others who ply their trade using their personal looks and charms, and by those who would not wish to be identified by an otherwise identifying potential scar.

However, despite rumors and the claims of charlatans and alchemists of dubious repute, silversheen blossoms do not have the power to enhance beauty. That false legend has been the bane of groves throughout the land, not to mention the downfall of any number of would-be thieves, and not a few silversheen plants.

Game application: When properly applied, silversheen eliminates any chance of Charisma loss due to scarring. Silversheen requires a Knowledge (nature) check (DC 30) to locate and harvest 1d3 blossoms. Proper application of Silversheen requires a Healing check (DC 20). Since silversheen blossoms are also very fragile, a failure destroys the blossom. Failures may be attempted only with a new blossom.

Cost: 1,000 gp per blossom

Weedwrap

Weedwrap is a heavy, dark brown member of the kelp family. It is only found in shallow oceanic tide pools at low tide. It may be identified by the sharp metallic odor of its bruised leaves, and a heavy medicinal taste.

Weedwrap stores and travels well. It may be dried for storage, where it will keep indefinitely if kept dry. To use, each sheet must be first soaked in warm salt water for several minutes. Once applied, it must be kept continuously moist throughout the healing process, otherwise, severe scarring or infection could occur.

The most important thing to remember about treating serious (second and third degree) burns is to keep the flesh moist and supple while guarding against infection. Weedwrap promotes such healing in two ways:it protects the healing flesh from infection with a powerful antiseptic, while at the same time it keeps the flesh from drying out.

Game application: Using Weedwrap on any second or third degree burns eliminates the chance of infection and reduces the healing time by 25%. Finding the kelp fronds to make weedwrap requires a Knowledge (nature) check (or comparable skill related to oceans or the sea) at DC 20. Properly applying Weedwrap requires a successful Healing check (DC 25). Failures may be retried, using a fresh sheet.

Cost: 25 gp per square yard sheet.

Field Medic Kit

This kit contains items useful for treating serious wounds on the battlefield or in situations where complete rest and time are not possible. The kit contains bandages, 1 application of draw salve, herbs, medicinal alcohol, 2 doses of Kremm, suture materials, 1 sq. yard of weedwrap and other useful materials. Use of this kit grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Heal checks.

Cost: 200 gp; Weight: 2 lbs.

Fortified Soup

Chicken broth, medicinal herbs and chunks of hearty meat may not be as heroic as mighty swords and scrolls of eldritch sorcery, but strong fortified soup has saved more lives than the greatest warrior. Fortified soup gives a +1 enhancement bonus to Fortitude saves for one day for the purposes of resisting disease, poison and other infirmities. Fortified soup is only effective in concert with a day of bed rest.

Cost: 2 sp/bowl

Hollow Teeth

Whilst losing a tooth can be painful, there can be an upside; a clever inventor realized after having his own tooth drop out that it could be cleaned out, modified and replaced, creating a tiny storage area. Since then he has been making teeth that can hold a single, small dose of liquid, accessible by clamping down the jaw to break the seal.

To break the seal, the user must clamp down with their teeth, making a Strength check at DC10. There are multiple applications for these including:

Cure minor wounds: One tooth holds enough liquid to cure 2hp of damage

Neutralize poison: Perfect for those parties when your host might be trying to poison you

Poison: In extreme cases, certain ‘diplomats’ have been known to hold a single dose of poison, to be used in the event of capture.

Any potion or oil can be stored within these false teeth, but due to the small size they must be concentrated, costing triple their usual amount. Other substances can be stored at the GM’s discretion. The tooth is a one-use item, but it can be refilled and resealed if taken care of carefully.

Tooth (including removal and modification): 50 gp; Weight:–

Tooth (replacement only): 40 gp

Filling potion cost: x3gp

Ice Maiden

Created by dwarves, this medicinal device has an appearance that one would associate with a torture chamber. It consists of a coffin-shaped metal container inside another, slightly larger container. The gap between layers is pumped free of air, creating a vacuum. Dwarves suffering from terrible fevers are placed in the ice maiden, which is then filled with ice water. The maiden is then sealed apart from a region over the patient’s face.

The ice maiden inflicts 1d6 points of subdual damage per hour that the character is contained within, but gives a +4 bonus to Constitution checks when recovering from severe fevers.

Cost: 500 gp.; Weight: 50 lbs.

Kremm

Made from the crushed bodies of subterranean centipedes, kremm acts as a coagulant in the bloodstream. It is used primarily by orcs shortly before combat and reduces the effects of bleeding, especially by critical hits or weapons of wounding. Any bleeding wound will coagulate and stop in 1d4 rounds once the kremm is absorbed into the body’s bloodstream. This effect lasts for one hour.

Unfortunately, it may cause a stroke-like side effect in some users if used during periods of prolonged stress. If a creature under the effects of Kremm participates in melee combat that lasts more than ten consecutive rounds (or any other period of prolonged stress at the GM’s discretion), he must make a Fortitude save (DC 10) or suffer 2d6 points temporary Dexterity damage followed by 1 point permanent Intelligence loss if a second save is unsuccessful.

Cost: 50 gp (1 dose); Weight: —

Leeches

Leeches can be applied to a poisoned or diseased wound. The blood-hungry parasites suck the venom or infection out along with the blood. A successful Heal check (DC 10) is required to apply 1d4 + 1 leeches correctly. The leeches’ blood drain automatically inflicts 1d4 points of damage per day when left attached, but if the Heal check is successful, the patient gains a +1 bonus to any Fortitude saves against the poison or illness for every point of damage inflicted by the leeches.

While not overly useful for healing combat damage, leeches offer a cure for one of its aftereffects—bruises. Taking physical blows of any kind leads to unsightly bruises of varying size. Typically, 5 hit points of injury equates to a half-inch bruise that lasts for days. Since a bruise’s appearance is caused by blood beneath that location on the skin, introducing a leech or two can erase it more quickly. One leech absorbs enough blood per round to remove a one-inch bruise mark. One round is the minimum amount of time a leech must remain on the bruise even if the size is less that an inch. Leeches may be collected in any suitable environment with a successful Survival check (DC 15).

Cost: 2 sp/leech; Weight: —

Medicinal Alcohol

When poured on a wound, medicinal alcohol painfully disinfects the injury, burning away filth and disease. It can also be taken internally, to dull the pain. However the alcohol is used, the patient must make a Fortitude save (DC 10) or take 1d3 points of subdual damage. The alcohol halves the chances of a wound becoming infected. Medicinal alcohol rubbed into the skin also gives a +2 circumstance bonus to Fortitude saves against exposure to cold.

Cost: 3 gp

Moxa

Moxa is an incense-like herbal mixture made from the dried leaves of the artemisia vulgaris plant. When used in treatment, it is literally burned onto the skin of the patient in order to provide healing to specific acupuncture points. Moxa typically comes in 6-inch rolled sticks. Sticks are usually about a half-inch and are sealed with paper bearing the manufactures mark. Applying moxa is a full-round action that must be done before treatment, but provides a +1 circumstance bonus to acupunctural-based heal skill checks. Each stick contains 6 uses, however an acupuncturist can only use single application per treatment.

Cost: 5 sp per stick; Weight: —

Poison-bane Wafers

Ever the paranoid noble, Hethelwaite the Sixteenth took to carrying very thin wafers soaked in a concoction of antidotes to every poison he knew of whenever he dined out. Unfortunately for him, when his assassin finally did make his attempt, the antidotes were no help against a dagger to the back. His wafers lived on however, and many a diner owes his life to these simple items.

There are two kinds of wafer available;the general purpose and the specialized. The general purpose wafers are proof against any common poison, but at the GM’s discretion certain rare poisons (DC 16 or higher) may require wafers treated with antidotes specifically designed to counter them.

An unfortunate side effect of the wafer is it’s dryness; anyone consuming one of these wafers will need to have a drink on hand, as they will find themselves unable to speak (or form verbal components for spells) until they have drunk at least half-pint of water or an equivalent beverage.

Cost:  350 gp (1 general wafer); GM discretion (1 specialized wafer); Weight: —

Sizeable Splint

This five-sectioned wooden staff is rectangular and each section can be sheathed into its base. The minimum and maximum lengths vary from nearly 10 inches (one section) to four feet (all sections extended), respectively. These settings lock and unlock by means of swiveling and can accommodate the limb sizes of any Small, Medium-size, or Large creatures. There is a cap on the splint’s widest end that allows access to a length of rope stored in the hollow interior. A 3 ft. silk rope is used to fix the splint in place on a broken (or similarly injured) limb. Successfully applying the splint requires a Heal check (DC 10) and results in no further damage to the limb caused by the wounded person’s own movements. A splinted creature suffers a -2 circumstance penalty to all skill and attack rolls involving that limb (this penalty does stack with any others that relate to the injury). Movement is also halved if the splinted limb is a leg. Sizing and affixing the splint requires a full round action.

Cost: 5 gp; Weight: 2.5 lbs.

Smuggler’s Eye

A hollow glass eye designed to store liquid, though other substances could conceivably be held within it. The eye is large enough to hold the concentrated (double normal cost) contents of a single potion vial, and is detailed enough to escape all but the most intense scrutiny (Perception check DC25). Masterwork versions are available, but must be custom-fitted and detailed to the individual user (increases the DC by 5 for each).

Cost: 100 gp (normal); 300 gp (masterwork); Weight: —

Smuggler’s Eye potion cost: potion cost x2

Surgical Kit

This kit contains items useful for treating serious or life-threatening wounds. In order for this kit to be used, the patient must be in a state of complete rest or inactivity. The kit contains a bone crank, 1 sq. yard of bone-set moss, 5 compression bandages, general bandages, 2 applications of draw salve, herbs, medicinal alcohol, 3 doses of Kremm, 2 stalks of slumberweed, suture materials, 1 sq. yard of weedwrap and other useful materials. Use of this kit grants a +4 circumstance bonus to all Heal checks.

Cost: 700 gp; Weight: 8 lbs.

Venom-flush

This liquid, carefully extracted from swamp-dwelling leeches, has an anti-coagulating effect on wounds it is applied to. When applied within 5 rounds of injury from a venomous bite or sting, venom-flush grants a +4 equipment bonus to all Heal checks made to treat an injury poison as it keeps the blood.

Cost: 20 gp (vial); Weight: —

Healing Spells

There are occasions where the standard array of healing spells offered from the core rules don’t seem to fit the style or type of campaign or else there is a need for more options and choices. The following spells are designed to supplement those core spells and not replace them.

Damage Reduction

Abjuration; Level: cleric 5, druid 5, Protection 5, sorcerer/wizard 5

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S, F

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: 1 round/2 spellcaster levels
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

This spell temporarily grants a damage reduction of 1/- that increases incrementally every 3 levels of the caster (3/- at 9th level, 4/- at 12th level, 5/- at 15th level, and so forth). The effects of this spell do not stack with any other existing forms of damage reduction.

Focus: A small piece of steel armor.

Finger of Life

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 5, druid 5

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Target: one creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: see text; Spell Resistance: see text

By means of this spell, you deliver healing magic to any creature within range. The spell duplicates the effects of any Healing spell of 3rd level or lower, but without requiring the caster to touch the beneficiary.

Greater Finger of Life

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 8

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Target: one creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: see text; Spell Resistance: see text

As finger of life, except that greater finger of life duplicates the effects of any Healing spell of 5th level or lower.

Heal Critical Injuries

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 5, druid 6, Healing 5

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S, F

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

When laying your hand upon a creature who has suffered a critical wound, positive energy is channeled into it, healing the wound at a rate of 1d12 points of critical wound damage + 1 point per caster level (maximum +10). This only heals wound damage that applies to a critical wound. Once the wound is healed, any remaining hit points are lost and not applied to the character’s total hit points.

Because undead are beings of negative energy, this spell deals damage to them instead of healing. An undead creature may apply spell resistance and attempt a Will save for half damage.

Focus: A drop of the caster’s blood.

Heal Broken Bones

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 3, druid 4, paladin 3, ranger 4, Healing 3

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S, F

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

When laying your hand upon a creature who has suffered a broken bone, positive energy is channeled into it, healing the wound at a rate of 1d6 points of critical wound damage + 1 point per caster level (maximum +7). Once the broken bone is healed, any remaining hit points are lost and not applied to the character’s total hit points.

Because undead are beings of negative energy, this spell deals damage to them instead of healing. An undead creature may apply spell resistance and attempt a Will save for half damage.

Focus: A small piece of bone.

Mend Severed Limb

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 3, druid 4, paladin 3, ranger 4, Healing 3

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S, F

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

When joining the severed limb of a wounded creature back to its original owner’s body, the caster channels positive energy through himself and into the two sections effectively fusing them. The effects of the spell will successfully graft the limb back onto the creature and heal 1d4 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (maximum +7) to the surrounding tissues. The spell does not fully heal the limb, but rather grafts and seals enough muscle and tissue around the point where severing took place to secure it. The limb cannot be used for anything strenuous for 1d20 days minus the caster’s level or risk losing it permanently unless further magical healing is utilized to heal the remaining critical wound damage.

Because undead are beings of negative energy, this spell deals damage to them instead of healing. An undead creature may apply spell resistance and attempt a Will save for half damage.

Focus: A needle and suture thread.

Remove Scars

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 2, druid 2, paladin 2, ranger 2, Healing 2

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

This spell allows the caster to channel a very small amount of positive energy in order to reverse the visible damage that scarring leaves. The caster must physically touch the scarred area, tracing it with his fingers while the energy heals the scar in turn. A caster may remove scars equivalent to one square inch per caster level on the body of an individual with a single spell. All Charisma penalties associated with scarring are removed at the rate of one point per every two levels of caster.

Rescue

Conjuration (Summoning); Level: cleric 3, druid 3

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S, DF

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Target: one defenseless ally
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: no

By means of this spell, you teleport an imperiled ally to your side. The spell only affects an ally who is unconscious, held, paralyzed, or otherwise incapable of movement and defense and within your line of sight. The ally appears within 5 ft. of you. Items belonging to the ally that are not carried or in hand are not transported by the spell. Thus, if an ally is felled in combat and drops his sword, the sword will not be transported along with its owner.

Restore Sanity

Conjuration (Healing); Level: cleric 6, druid 7, Healing 6

CASTING

Casting Time: One standard action
Components: V, S, XP

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: Creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: yes (harmless)

Individuals who are stricken with a mental disease or are subjected to mind-affecting spells, such as confusion or insanity, that interferes with logical thought processes benefit greatly from this spell. Healing energy is channeled into the individual restoring his ability to think clearly and rationally. Any Intelligence or Wisdom points lost, however, are not regained.

XP Cost: 500 XP

Magical Accessories

Magic items are not only meant for offensive or defensive purposes. Some function as healing aids or even as enhancements to counter the loss of a key sensory organ.

Enchanted Acupuncture Needles

These masterwork needle sets are identical in function to masterwork acupuncture needles. In addition, they allow an acupuncturist to perform magical treatments as determined by their enchantments.

Needles of Compulsion

This set of 30 needles are enchanted to enable their user to attempt to affect a patient with a compulsion to avoid or perform a certain act when triggered as a response to a specific substance, creature, or situation. Initially, such needles were designed to treat addictions, allergies, and phobias. After successful treatment, patient is affected as if under the effects of a permanent suggestion spell. Treatment takes 10 minutes and has a DC of 13. The effects can be negated with a successful Will save against the acupuncturist’s Heal skill check.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells suggestion; Price 7,500 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Needles of Saving Grace

This set of 30 needles are enchanted to temporarily improve one of a patient’s saving throws. A successful treatment imbues the patient with a +2 enhancement bonus to Fortitude, Reflex and Will saves for a number of hours equal to the acupuncturist’s Heal skill ranks. The treatment takes 30 minutes and has a DC of 15. A patient can only benefit from the effects of a single treatment at a time.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells resistance; Price 3,250 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Needles of Divine Purification

These needles allow the acupuncturist to treat magical toxins, poisons, and diseases as if they were non-magical in nature.

CL 4th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells cure disease, neutralize poison; Price 2,500 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Needles of Restoration

This set of 30 needles can be used to undo the damaging effects of negative levels. A successful treatment requires 30 minutes and has a Heal skill check with a DC equal to the initial Fortitude DC of whatever inflicted the negative level.

CL 4th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells restoration; Price 4,000 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Eyes of Elves

This thin green leather eye-patch is textured to look like a leaf with small pearls lining the edge. Wearers of this eye-patch will detect secret doors as per an elf as well as have a +4 bonus towards perception checks provided the eye the patch covers no longer functions or is gone.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, creator must be an elf, detect secret doors; Price: 2,160 gp; Weight: –.

Gem of Cleaning

This simple magic item is made from a small gem. It is imbued with cleansing qualities, originally fabricated for nobles and their knights. The gem can cast the following abilities simultaneously once per day: remove disease and neutralize poison. It also magically removes all dirt leaving the item spotless. These abilities only work on the object to which it is affixed and has no affect on flesh and blood creatures. It has since become sought by prosthesis users to lessen the hardships.

CL 5th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells remove disease, neutralize poison; Price: 1,500 gp; Weight: —

Gem of Reparation

This simple magic item is made from a small gem. It is imbued with repairing qualities, originally fabricated for nobles and their knights. Once per day, the gem can simultaneously mend broken parts and lubricate any moving parts. While affixed to an item, it will automatically un-warp and de-rust it. It will also prevent it from becoming rusty or warped with no saving throw required (handy against rust monsters). These abilities only work on the object to which it is affixed and has no affect on flesh and blood creatures. It has since become sought by prosthesis users to lessen the hardships.

CL 5th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells make whole, grease, resist elements (rust), warp; Price: 3,000 gp; Weight: —

Healing Satchel

This small pack appears to be a well used, as well as weathered, brown leather bag with four small pouches, two on opposing sides and two on the front, and one larger central storage area. The fasteners are brass, with an adjustable shoulder strap that looks easily slung across chest and shoulders. It resembles the kind of rigging one sees for a healer’s kit. In fact this item is a cousin of the bag of holding with the four smaller pouches able to hold 2 cubic feet in volume or 20 pounds in weight. The central area holds 6 cubic feet or 60 pounds in weight. Even with filled to the point of bursting, the satchel only weighs 2 pounds. When the user reaches into any of the segments of this satchel the item they are wishing to retrieve is always at hand. However, only items used in the practice of healing can be stored in the pack. Mundane equipment such as torches, clothes, etc. are spit out when placed within the bag.

CL 9th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells secret chest; Price: 1,500 gp; Weight: 2 lb.

Liquid Webbing

This is a thick, fibrous fluid that coagulates immediately when exposed to the air. Liquid webbing applied to a major wound provides a +4 circumstance bonus to subsequent Heal checks made to stabilize a dying character.

CL 3rd; Feats: Brew Potion, web; Price: 50 gp.

Merchant’s Eye

The eye that constitutes this magic item is a small black leather packet approximately 2 inches wide, by 1 inch in height. A simple white piece of leather is stitched onto the packet on one side, to roughly emulate the oval appearance of an eye. The Merchant’s Eye is designed to fit within an empty eye socket, however it can be used as an eye-patch.

In the form of an eye-patch, the Merchant’s Eye will irritate a functioning eye that is behind it, such that if used for more than 10 minutes at a time, the eye will be –2 to Appraise, Knowledge (nature), and Perception checks for the next day. Normal use of the Merchant’s Eye provides a +5 bonus to Appraise checks.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells detect secret doors; Price: 500 gp; Weight: –.

Oil of Mending

This oil will immediately heal a broken bone (or bones) in the area to which it is applied (thus nullifying the restrictions of a broken bone critical effect) provided the bone has been properly set first with a successful Heal check (DC 15). Although it heals the bone, this oil does not heal any of the internal damage around the break (the subject does not regain any hit points). An ounce will cover a single Body Location (one arm, one leg, several ribs, etc.) of a medium-sized creature.

CL 7th; Feats: Brew Potion, cure serious wounds; Price: 750 gp.

Rod of Twin Life

This 2 foot long golden rod is a thin cylinder bejeweled with three amber spheres, two copper piece sized stones at either end and a fist-sized gem at its center. Essentially, the rod is a magical healing diffuser. When two creatures grasp either end of the rod, a third spellcaster may cast any healing spell or spell-like effect that heals a definite amount of damage upon the central gem. The magical healing then flows equally into the other holders (odd results are rounded down). Spells such as neutralize poison or remove disease, which do not heal actual hit point damage, are ineffective when cast upon the rod. It is possible for one of the recipients to also be the source of the healing power, thus sharing her healing abilities with another.

CL 7th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells cure light wounds, cure serious wounds; Price: 15,000 gp

Wound Bug

This 2-inch long tiny construct appears to be a mechanical insect or spider. If it is laid upon the intended recipient and a command word is spoken, it will animate and begin to systematically crawl across the recipient’s body, sewing up any lacerations. If the user suffers a bleeding critical hit, the wound bug will immediately move to the affected area and sew the wound closed in 1d3 rounds, stabilizing the patient (if unconscious and bleeding).

CL 10th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects, web; Price: 900 gp

Artificial Limbs

Since ancient times, warriors have returned home with their bodies in ruins. Limbs and other extremities often fall victim to blade, claw or disease. One way to overcome these disabilities is attaching artificial limbs to replace those lost. From a simple hook, to more specialized prosthetic limbs, to magical attachments; characters have many options for replacing lost body parts.

Mechanical Prosthetics

In fantasy worlds, the most common artificial replacement is the hook, designed so that those who have lost any part of the arm below the elbow can pick up small objects. If the amputation involves the loss of the elbow, then usually no prosthesis was used. Occasionally a crude hinged elbow joint might have been used. The common medieval fantasy-based society does not posses the technology to produce anything more complex. Creatures with prosthetic hooks cannot wield weapons in that hand, or weapons that require two hands (with the exception of the bow). They also cannot cast spells with somatic components. Though hooks can be useful, they do not provide fine manipulation of objects. Even if a spell does not have a somatic component, or the somatic component is bypassed (such as with the Still Spell feat), creatures with hooks need to succeed at a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + spell level) to cast spells with material components. The following effects should be applied to the character’s skills with a below the elbow (transradial) amputation:

Table 2-12: Transradial Amputation Skill Modifiers
Skill Modifier
Acrobatics -2
Craft Varies
Disable Device -8
Disguise -8 (unless impersonation involves similar prosthesis)
Escape Artist -6 (hook tends to catch on bindings and restraints)
Heal -2
Intimidate +2 (folk tend to be frightened of a nasty-looking prosthesis)
Perform Varies
Profession Varies
Ride -2 (handling reins is not an easy task with a hook)
Sleight of Hand -2
Swim -2
Use Magic Device -6
Table 2-12A: Transhumeral Amputation Skill Modifiers
Skill Modifier
Acrobatics -4
Craft Varies
Disable Device -12
Disguise -12 (unless impersonation involves similar prosthesis)
Escape Artist -6 (hook tends to catch on bindings and restraints)
Heal -2
Intimidate -2 (prosthesis is no longer frightening, but more of a pity instrument)
Perform Varies
Profession Varies
Ride -4 (handling reins is not an easy task with a hook)
Sleight of Hand -10
Swim -2
Use Magic Device -12

Perhaps the greatest advantage of hooks is that the wearer is always considered armed provided they know how to use it as a weapon. A hook is a tiny, simple, piercing weapon that does 1d4 points of damage with a critical range of 19-20 (see Attachments in Combat). A basic hook costs 30 gp to attach, and is considered to have no weight.

The second most common form of combat injury is the loss of a leg or foot. Any amputation through the thigh or below can be replaced with an artificial leg. Legs can be elaborately carved, or just a simple peg leg. Even with the addition of movable joints, a non-magical leg replacement can never truly replicate the real thing. A bipedal creature with a mechanical leg replacement has their movement rate reduced by one quarter due to the pain of the prosthetic fitting, and suffers a –2 dodge penalty to AC. The following effects should be applied to the character’s skills with a below-the-knee (transtibial) amputation.

Table 2-13: Transtibial Amputation Skill Modifiers
Skill Modifier
Acrobatics -4
Climb -6
Craft Varies
Disguise -8 (unless impersonation involves similar prosthesis)
Perform Varies
Profession Varies
Ride -2
Stealth -6 (metal), -4 (wood), no penalty if wrapped or coated in a quieting material such as leather
Swim ½ swim base speed but subtract 40 lbs. from weight of swimmer (Medium-size)
Table 2-13A: Transfemoral Amputation Skill Modifiers
Skill Modifier
Acrobatics -8 (no muscle lever arm for the spring needed)
Climb -10
Craft Varies
Disguise -12 (unless impersonation involves similar prosthesis)
Perform Varies
Profession Varies
Ride -4
Stealth -6 (metal), -4 (wood), no penalty if wrapped or coated in a quieting material such as leather
Swim ¼ swim base speed but subtract 60 lbs. from weight of swimmer (Medium-size)

In addition, the creature’s Strength and Dexterity are considered to be one-half their original scores for the purposes of determining Acrobatics, Climb, Jump, Stealth and Swim checks.

A standard peg leg costs 30 gp to attach, and has no weight. Characters may chose to purchase a more realistic prosthesis, but at a considerable higher price.

Mechanical replacements can do little for the loss of other extremities. Fingers and toes are usually insignificant to have replaced unless cosmetically desired, and the functions of other body parts cannot be replicated. Despite the realities of the situation, people do still try mechanical methods of replacement for extremities, such as a glass eye, although these are extremely rare. These replacements may slightly offset some circumstance penalties on Charisma checks or Charisma based skills, but have no physical function.

A glass eye can cost 50 gp or higher, depending upon craftsmanship and materials used.

Attachments in Combat

Besides hooks, characters may also opt to have actual melee weapons attached to their prostheses. These weapon prostheses can be quite useful, but they are seldom as good as a weapon used in a real hand. Because attached weapons do not have the same range of motion, and cannot bring the same force of leverage to bare, they suffer penalties as described in Table 2-14.

Table 2-14: Prosthetic Weapon Attachment Penalties
Weapon Size* To Hit Penalty Damage Penalty
Tiny -2 0
Small -4 -2
Medium -6 -4

*Based upon a Medium-size creature, creatures larger or smaller would base penalties relative to their size (Tiny = weapon two size categories smaller than the creature, etc.).

An exception to the use of prosthetic attachments is the weapon on the end of a chain. This is a common sight for warriors who are high enough in social stature or can afford the cost. This is fastened by a series of leather straps and latches, which allows a proficient fighter to do more damage because of the shorted leverage arm and more strength behind the swing with greater control. A weapon of this kind grants the character a +1 attack and +1 damage bonus for a chain weapon instead of using the penalties in Table 2-14.

Weapons that must be used in two hands are too unwieldy to be attached as prosthetics. The only exception to this is the bow. Archers that have lost a single hand are still able to utilize a bow with a specialized prosthetic bow attachment and some training. Prosthetic weapon attachments cost 30 gp, plus the cost of the weapon and the prosthesis, and act the same as the weapon in all other respects. Prosthetic weapon attachments may be masterwork, with the same costs and benefits.

New Feat

Prosthetic Weapon Proficiency [General]

You have learned to wield prosthetic weapon attachments more effectively.

Benefit: Having this feat reduces attack and damage penalties for using a prosthetic weapon attachment by 2, but cannot raise the penalty to a bonus above 0.

Normal: See Attachments in Combat, and Table 2-14:Prosthetic Weapon Attachment Penalties.

Non-Magical Prosthetic Inventions by the Gnomes:

Due to the creativity and ingenuity of the gnomes, many people that have lost a limb, have been given a second chance. The process usually takes about a month to fabricate one of these prosthetic devices. It involves fine hand carving and hollowing out of wood so as to reduce the weight. The leather strap system must be carefully measured as the order is placed. The addition of a metal joint/hinge is more costly, but does allow a more realistic look of movement.

The enemy of the prosthesis is water. Water can caused the wood to warp, grow mold and become unhygienic, or rust the metal parts. If the leg is not shielded or covered, every round the prosthesis is exposed to a large amount of water, it must make a saving throw DC (15) or suffer 2 points of warp/rust damage. This damage can only be removed in the field by un-warping or un-rusting spell magic. Otherwise it must be taken back to an expert for repairs.

The use of the prosthesis is not without its hardships. The wearer cannot sleep with the prosthesis on, as the skin needs time to breath. It takes 1 full round action to don the prosthesis. For every night the user sleeps with it on, there is a 5% cumulative chance that a skin ulcer can occur. Developing a skin ulcer causes 1 point of damage to the user. The skin ulcer would cause pain and irritation making it hard to concentrate on a variety of tasks. The user is at –2 to all attack, damage, skills and saving throws; and takes 1 additional point of damage cumulatively per day of continued use of the prosthesis while enduring the skin ulcer. This reflects the growth of the skin ulcer. Magical healing will negate these effects. A normal Healing check (DC 15) will stop the skin ulcer from getting worse. With normal healing, the user must not wear the prosthesis for a number of days equal to the points of damage sustained by the skin ulcer. This will recover one hit point per day.

An additional hardship is the need to have the leather strapping system cleaned every few days to avoid hygiene issues. Having the prosthesis dirty will cause a stench to develop (-3 to all Charisma-based checks). The user’s skin will become irritated and itchy (-2 to Will saves). If it remains dirty for a month, the user develops a skin ulcer (see above). A user is taught how to take care of their prosthesis with soap and water. The cleaning process never damages the prosthesis. Unfortunately, this means the user must always carry cleaning supplies with them on their journeys. However, this is a small price to pay for the restored mobility.

The following is a list of basic prostheses and their stats:

Prosthesis Type Description Hardness/Hit points Cost Weight
Finger Simple carved wooden finger held in place by a double signet ring from the false finger an adjacent existing one. 5/10 20 gp *
Hand Simple carved wooden hand, either open palm or closed fist held in place by a system of leather straps to the forearm. 5/20 50 gp 1 lb.
Hook Simple metal hook held in place by a system of leather straps to the forearm. 10/30 30 gp 1 lb.
Below Elbow Simple carved wooden forearm section with either a hand or hook built in (non-removable) held in place by a system of leather straps to the elbow and bicep. 5/20 60 gp 2 lbs.
Above Elbow Simple carved wooden arm complete with a single axis pin elbow joint (which can rust if not kept well oiled), which can either move freely or be locked into position by the user with a pushed locking pin. 6/25 100 gp 4 lbs.
Peg Leg Simple carved wooden leg post that can be attached to any residual limb level below the knee by a system of leather straps. 5/20 30 gp 3 lbs.
Foot Made of several layers of thick leather with a wooden core and shaped to resemble original foot. This is held in place by a system of leather straps to the calf/shin. 6/25 50 gp 2 lbs.
Below Knee Simple carved wooden leg with a foot built in held in place by a system of leather straps to the knee and thigh. 5/20 80 gp 5 lbs.
Above Knee Simple carved wooden leg with a single axis pin knee joint (which can rust if not kept well oiled), which can either move freely or be locked into position by the user with a pushed locking pin. 6/25 130 gp 10 lbs.

* no weight worth noting

The gnomes aren’t without their flair for the diverse and unusual. If the prosthesis is attacked directly, there is a 20% chance that a special feature is damaged. If the prosthesis is destroyed, so is the special feature. Listed below are a variety of special features that can be added on to an existing prosthesis:

Special Added Features Description Added Cost Added Weight
Leather Covered The prosthesis can be completely covered in leather. The leather chosen is usually a color similar to the user’s skin and treated to withstand water damage. 5 gp 1 lb.
Water-Proofed The prosthesis is coated with a plant-derived lacquer, which usually has a colored dye to closely match the skin color of the user. Metal parts are coated with special waterproofing oil that need only be reapplied once every 6 months. 10 gp *
Secret Compartment The prosthesis is equipped with a secret opening into the hollowed out area. It is good for keeping small items, money or a single dagger-sized weapon. This may not be done to a hand or foot. 15 gp *
Quick Disconnect The parts of the prosthesis may be disconnected (i.e. hand from an arm). This would allow a variety of attachments to be fastened in place. 20 gp *
Fine Tool Attachment This allows a user to attach a specific set of tools to continue his trade. The user gains the full benefits of a tool kit. Normally, the use of the prosthesis reduced the bonus of tool kits by 1. 25 gp *
Weapon/Shield Attachment One specific shield or weapon can be added to the prosthesis. It cannot be removed or interchanged without the Quick Disconnect feature. See Attachments In Combat for further details. 30 gp + cost of the weapon 1 lb. + weight of the weapon
Retractable Forearm Blade A concealed (Perception check DC 25) blade springs straight out of thin slot just above the wrist and locks in place. The blade does 1d4+1 damage, critical (x2) in combat. It retracts by pressing a button depressed in the underside of the arm. 75 gp 3 lbs.
Peg Leg Dart Launcher A single dart may be fired from the hollowed out shaft of the peg leg. A successful Acrobatics check must be made at DC 14 if attempting to fire it while its being worn. An attack roll is made with a –2 modifier. Darts do 1d4 damage, crit (x2), range increment 30 ft. (due to the long shaft). The launcher cannot be reloaded while wearing the prosthesis. The dart is inserted into the top, inside section and is considered a standard action. 75 gp 1 lb.
Arm Dart Launcher A volley of 3 darts is released when the prosthetic hand is bend upward at a 90-degree angle. One single attack roll is made with a –2 modifier. Either all three hit or miss. Darts do 3d4 damage, crit (x2), range increment 20 ft. The launcher may be reloaded through a compartment on the side of the prosthesis and takes 4 full round actions to do so. 150 gp 3 lbs.
Grappling Hook Launcher This arm prosthesis is made with a secret compartment with a spool of 100 feet of fine silk rope. By removing a special quick-disconnect hand, the grappling hook can be loaded into the wrist section containing complicated, tightly wound springs. This can fire the hook 95 feet up fairly accurately. The other end is tightly secured to the prosthesis. Unfortunately, the spool must be wound up manually. If fired directly against an opponent, it does 1d6 bludgeoning damage, no critical possible. 150 gp 5 lbs.

Magical Prosthetics

After losing a limb, most characters will want to return to their full capacity. Magical replacements offer the best way to do this. Though a regenerate spell seems to be the quickest and easiest solution, regenerate is a high-level spell, and such clerical magic may not be available. Also, magical replacements have some advantages.

Spellcasters can create artificial limbs with the Craft Wondrous Item feat, though some artificial limb enhancements require Craft Magic Arms and Armor as well. Any magical prosthesis can be attached by simply holding it against the flesh where the extremity is missing. Magical prostheses cannot be placed on creatures that have not lost that particular limb, though a creature could purposely remove their own limb in order to use the magical one.

Magical limbs and extremities take up magical item slots. Magical arms and hands cannot be used in conjunction with gloves, legs cannot be used with boots, and magical eyes cannot be used with any sort of goggles. Fortunately, any magical enhancement that can be placed upon these items can also be placed upon a magical prosthesis in addition, and can be added in addition to the replace function quality for no extra cost. Unlike the original magical items, the magical prosthesis need not be used in pairs to work. A single hand replaced with a magical prosthesis that has the ogre power quality would work just fine.

Each magical prostheses can hold one quality, plus the replace function quality. Also unlike regular magical boots, gloves, and goggles, magical prosthetics have the capability of holding more than one magical quality, though doing so adds considerably to the cost and effort to manufacture. For each magical quality added after the first (and replace function), the experience and gold piece cost is doubled. For example, a wizard could make a magical hand with the replace function, ogre power, storing, and dexterity +4 qualities. The most expensive quality is always considered the first – thus 6,000 gp and 240 xp for replace function, 16,000 gp and 640 xp for dexterity +4, 4,400 gp and 176 xp for storing, and 8,000 gp and 320 xp for ogre power, for a total of 34,400 gp and 1,376 xp to create this prosthetic.

Most magical prostheses are made out of metal, and look like a piece of armor. Other materials can conceivably be used, though they do not add to the limbs function. Magical prostheses never look like normal limbs (unless the glamered function has been added). Most follow the standard humanoid pattern of five fingers and an opposable thumb, little has been found to improve upon this design, though limbs can sometimes be made in the likeness of a certain type of creature (such as a dover’s paw). The prosthesis generally imbued with weight reducing magic, so it is considered to have no weight.

A creature with a magical prosthetic arm or hand is always considered armed, provided they know how to use it as a weapon. A standard prosthetic hand does 1d3 points of damage, though claws or spikes can be added to raise this to 1d4. Large claws can be added for an additional 1300 gp (some may cost as much as 3,000 gp if they are retractable), which do 1d6 points of damage. None of these additions affect a monk’s unarmed combat damage.

Prosthetic Qualities

In addition to the magical qualities found in gloves, boots, and goggles, magical prostheses do have some unique abilities.

Replace Function: A magical prosthesis with this quality duplicates the function of the original limb. Magical hands can once again grasp, legs can jump, and eyes can see. This negates any and all penalties for missing or replacement limbs. The creature’s ability scores when using the magical prosthetic are unaffected.

CL 11th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects or telekinesis; Price: 16,000 gp; Cost: 3,000 gp + 240 XP.

Glamered: The magical prosthesis looks and feels like a real limb of its type. A prosthesis with this quality must also have replace function. The limb looks exactly like the wearer’s original, and cannot be altered.

CL 2nd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells change self; Price: 11,000 gp; Cost: 500 gp + 40 XP.

Arm/Hand Qualities and Magical Replacements

Claw Strike: A prosthesis with this quality always has small claws. Upon command, the claws shoot forth, using the creature’s ranged attack bonus, and striking the target for 5d4 points of damage on a successful hit. Any enhancement bonus, or elemental grasp qualities the prosthesis possesses are added to the attack’s to hit and damage rolls. The claws grow back after one hour, and can then be used again.

CL 11th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, Craft Magic Arms and Armor; Price: 18,100 gp; Cost: 4,050 gp + 320 XP.

Elemental Grasp: Upon creation, the creator decides what type of elemental damage the prosthetic will inflict (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). Three times per day, with a successful melee touch attack, the prosthetic inflicts 1d8 + 10 points of damage of the specific elemental type. This ability can be used as part of an unarmed combat attack requiring a normal to hit roll.

CL 10th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, Craft Magic Arms and Armor, and acid arrow (acid), or burning hands (fire), or ray of frost (cold), or shocking grasp (electricity), or sound burst (sonic); Price: 19,000 gp; Cost: 4,500 gp + 360 XP.

Enhancement Bonus: Adding this quality gives the prosthesis an enhancement bonus on to hit and damage rolls for unarmed melee attacks. It does not add any bonus to a weapon used in the prosthetic hand.

CL 5th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, Craft Magic Arms and Armor, greater magic weapon; Price: 12,000 gp (+1), 18,000 gp (+2), 28,000 gp (+3), 42,000 gp (+4), 60,000 gp (+5); Cost: 1,000 gp + 80 XP (+1), 4,000 gp + 320 XP (+2), 9,000 gp + 720 XP (+3), 16,000 gp +1,280 XP (+4), 25,000 gp +2,000 XP (+5).

Weapon-Breaker: A prosthetic hand with this quality has been specially made to destroy an enemy’s weapon. The wearer gains free use of the Improved Disarm feat. With a successful disarm attack, the wearer is considered to have grasped his enemy’s weapon. The victim of this attack may chose to let go of the weapon, or attempt a disarm of their own on subsequent rounds, with a successful disarm pulling the weapon free. If the opponent does not succeed, they may make no other attacks. Each subsequent round the weapon is grasped, the prosthetic hand squeezes it in an attempt to break the weapon. The grasped weapon automatically takes 1d6 + Str x 2 damage per round, ignoring hardness except hardness that is gained through magical enhancement. For example, a +3 sword grasped by a prosthesis wearer that has 18 Strength, would take (1d6+4 x 2) –3 points of damage.

CL 14th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, Craft Magic Arms and Armor; Price: 28,000 gp; Cost: 9,000 gp + 720 XP.

Hand of Useful Items

This prosthesis has the replace function and glamered qualities. It is a hand that magically melds with any other prosthetic device. Upon command word, the hand polymorphs into the desired object. The hand can only polymorph into small, simple objects with non-moving parts. For example, it can turn into a hammer, cup, bucket, shovel, short sword or buckler. If used as part of a tool kit, you receive a +1 circumstance bonus to your skill checks due to the fact that the item feels like a living extension. If polymorphed into thief’s tools, a +2 circumstance bonus is applied to Disable Device checks.

CL 15th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects, polymorph any object; Price: 23,000 gp; Weight: 5 lbs.

Hand of Xorn

The Hand of Xorn was created for a specifically dwarven purpose. Only a handful of these have been made to replace the lost hands of great dwarven warriors. The Hand of Xorn is made from the claws of a Xorn with powerful magic added in. This prosthesis has the Replace Function and Glamered Qualities. Two claws have been magically joined to create a single nasty, four-pronged claw capable of spinning at tremendous speeds. It gives the user: burrow 10 feet. When used as a weapon, it does 1d12 damage, Critical (x3). The user suffers a Charisma circumstance skill check penalty of –2, due to its unattractive features among non-dwarves. Dwarves react with a +2 bonus in recognition of their greatness. Any Xorn will attack a user of the Hand of Xorn on sight. The grasping capabilities of this item are rudimentary at best.

CL 11th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects; Price: 7,000 gp; Weight: 5 lbs.

Horko’s Wonderful Arm

These mechanical prostheses were the creation of the master artisan Horko. Magically grafted to an armless shoulder, the mithral arm acts in most respects as the owner’s natural one once did. It does not count towards the limit on magic items worn. While it imparts no sense of touch, it does allow the user to grip objects and even perform fine detail work, including the ability to make the somatic gestures required for many spells. The arm may be used as a weapon, or function as a shield. Attacking with the arm is considered an armed attack, and does not cause an attack of opportunity. There are no special bonuses or penalty to hit with the arm, and it requires no weapon proficiencies. Most weapon-based feats, such as weapon focus or improved critical, may be taken with the wonderful arm as the weapon choice. Attacking with the arm while fighting with a weapon in the other hand incurs the penalties of fighting with two weapons. The arm is considered a light weapon. The arm does 1d8 points of damage, with a critical threat of 19-20/x2. The arm may also substitute for a shield if it does not wield a weapon or is not used as a weapon during a round. It confers a +1 shield bonus, and does not require shield proficiency. When used as a shield, it gives a 5% arcane spell failure chance. The arm cannot be disarmed.

If the wearer of the arm rolls a 1 on a check during any operation utilizing the arm, there is a chance that the arm malfunctions. Roll d% and consult the table below.

Table 2-15: Arm Malfunctions
% Die Roll Result
01-30 No malfunction occurs.
31-55 Arm drops anything it was holding.
56-70 Arm’s grip tightens, causing 1d8 damage to anything it is holding.
71-80 Arm locks up for 1d4 rounds. It may not be used during this time.
81-90 Arm flails about wildly, attacking random target for one round.
91-98 Arm belches oily smoke from its gears and pistons that acts as a fog cloud for 1d4 rounds.
99-00 Arm explodes! Acts as a fireball for 5d6 damage (Reflex save DC 15, half damage). The arm cannot be salvaged.

Caster Level: 15th;Prerequisites: Craft Wondrous Item, Craft Magic Arms and Armor, limited wish, polymorph any object; Market Price: 42,000 gp; Weight: 6 lbs.

Kogan’s Magical Arm/Leg of Storing

The wizard Kogan has been a purveyor of items with pocket dimensions for many a year. It came to no surprise to him when he was approached by a warrior to see if his bag of holding could be adapted to work with his prosthetic leg. Soon Kogan was flooded with requests to put in dimensional compartments into a wide variety of prosthetic devices. The user need only reach into the compartment and the item searched for is always magically drawn to his hands. This is a move-equivalent action. The following table reflects the limitations of each device:

Prosthesis Type Contents Weight Limit Contents Volume Limit Market Price
Arm of Storing 250 lbs. 30 cu. Feet 3,000 gp
Leg of Storing 500 lbs. 70 cu. Feet 5,700 gp

CL 9th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells secret chest; Weight: 5 lbs. (Arm), 10 lbs. (Leg).

Talanosvyr’s Wand Loader Arm

The insane wizard, Talanosvyr, was captured in battle and had his arm cut off for his war crimes. After escaping, he spent years plotting his revenge. This powerful device was his crowning achievement. It has since been copied, but not as well as the original. It is a below elbow prosthesis with the Replace Function Quality. In addition, it has four equally placed depressions about 2 inches wide and 2 inches deep running the length of the forearm. One wand may be loaded into each slot. The abilities of all wands may be used one function at a time as though the user were already holding them. The use of a wand function is a free action as long as it does not involve an attack roll or need to be aimed. The wands may be removed normally.

The original Wand Loader Arm’s abilities allowed Talanosvyr to use a function of each wand simultaneously. It is said that his revenge was brutal and swift. The whereabouts of the original item are not known, but may make for a good adventure hook.

CL 15th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects, levitate; Price: 50,000 gp (120,000 gp for the original); Weight: —

Telescoping Arm of Grasping

This forearm is made of many magic metal rings, one inside the other, which upon command word telescopes out 5 feet. Due to the amount of metal involved in its creation, the arm is also imbued with magic to make it lighter. This prosthesis has the Replace Function and Glamered Qualities.

CL 11th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects; levitate; Price: 9,000 gp; Weight: 5 lbs.

Leg/Foot Qualities and Magical Replacements

Air Walk: Upon command, the wearer can use the spell air walk for 80 minutes, once per day.

CL 8th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells air walk; Price: 21,520 gp; Cost: 5,760 gp + 230 XP.

Immovable: Once per day, for 10 rounds, the wearer of this prosthesis can stick their leg in the ground and take on a defensive stance. In this defensive stance, the wearer gains the following benefits: +2 Strength, +4 Constitution, and +2 resistance bonus on all saves. While in this stance, the wearer cannot move, though he may voluntarily end the stance early. While in the stance, the wearer cannot use skills or abilities that require him to shift position, such as Acrobatics or Stealth. At the end of the defensive stance, the wearer is winded, and suffers a –2 penalty to Strength for the rest of the encounter. In all other respects, the defensive stance is the same as the Dwarven Defender ability of the same name.

CL 16th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells bull’s strength, endurance; Price: 27,500 gp; Cost: 8,750 gp + 700 XP.

Tripping: The creature wearing a prosthesis with this ability gains access to the Improved Trip feat for free. In addition, the wearer receives the +4 stability bonus on the opposed check for tripping.

CL 12th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Price: 26,000 gp; Cost: 8,000 gp + 640 XP.

Telescoping Leg

This leg works similarly to the Telescoping Arm, except it can telescope out 10 feet. This prosthesis can be extremely useful for gaining any sort of height advantage. An Acrobatics or Dexterity Check (DC 10) is required to keep from falling over. This prosthesis has the Replace Function and Glamered Qualities. If person has two of these items on and fully telescoped, there is no penalty to balance, add 10 to base land speed and size category increases by one.

CL 11th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells animate objects; levitate; Price: 11,000 gp; Weight: 10 lbs.

Eye Qualities and Magical Replacements

Archer’s Eye: A creature with this magical eye in place gains free use of the Far Shot feat, and a +4 bonus on Perception checks to see things at a distance.

CL 12th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Price: 26,000 gp; Cost: 8,000 gp + 640 XP.

Devil’s Wink: Upon command, three times per day, a creature with this magical eye in place forces a victim to succeed at a Will save (DC 18) or suffer a –4 penalty on their next subsequent Will save versus a mind-affecting effect. This is considered a gaze attack. Whether or not they succeed at the initial save, the victim has no indication that any magical attack has been made upon them, or that their next save will be penalized.

CL 15th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells feeblemind; Price: 32,000 gp; Cost: 11,000 gp + 880 XP.

Bayne’s Gemstone Eye

Bayne was a gem cutter of master skill and when he originally created this item it was out of a pure deep purple amethyst. The gemstone was oval shaped to fit perfectly in the eye socket. Although the powers of a gemstone eye were duplicated, the pure seamless physical appearance has never been exactly duplicated.

The gem must be placed in the eye socket of someone who has lost an eye. It will not function when placed in front of an eye, nor in any other mode except directly in the socket. It does not replace the lost vision of the wearer, instead providing a +10 Perception enhancement bonus to compensate for the loss.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells clairvoyance; Price: 12,000 gp; Weight: –.

Glass Eye of Surveillance

This eye functions as a glass eye of vision, but with some important differences. The crafter of a glass eye of surveillance is able to see through it, in effect viewing whatever the wearer does. The creator of a glass eye can only see through one glass eye at a time, and while doing so, cannot see through his own eyes. There is no distance limit as long as the eye remains on the same plane.

 Most crafters of glass eyes of surveillance force their minions to wear them, creating a legion of spies that they are in constant contact with. On rare occasion, a crafter is able to trick an unsuspecting dupe into wearing the glass eye. The glass eye can magically be removed by a wish or miracle spell. The glass eye could also be surgically removed or plucked out by force, both of which would be highly traumatic for the wearer.

CL 13th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells clairaudience/clairvoyance, scrying, true seeing, regenerate; Market Price: 45,000 gp; Weight: -.

Glass Eye of Vision

This eye is crafted as a replacement for someone who’s lost his or her own. It does not count towards the limit on magic items worn. If placed inside the empty eye socket of a living creature, the glass eye magically melds to the creature. It allows the wearer to see as they once did, and if they have low-light vision or darkvision, the glass eye is fully functional with that vision. Anything that affects the wearer’s vision affects the glass eye as well. In addition, the glass eye gives the wearer a +4 circumstance bonus to Perception checks. The wearer may also activate true seeing 3/day as the spell.

CL 13th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells clairaudience/clairvoyance, true seeing, regenerate; Market Price: 21,000 gp; Weight: –.

Glass Eye of Enhanced Vision

This eye is crafted as a replacement for someone who’s lost his or her own. It does not count towards the limit on magic items worn. If placed inside the empty eye socket of a living creature, the glass eye magically melds to the creature. The eye’s appearance to others is a highly polished mirror (-2 on Charisma checks). This magical eye allows the wearer to not only see perfectly, but also grants darkvision, see invisibility and true seeing. These abilities are identical to the spells and may be used at will. In addition, the user is immune to gaze attacks and may fight such creatures while keeping their good eye closed. The user suffers a -1 attack penalty, while fighting with only one eye open.

CL 13th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells clairaudience/clairvoyance, darkvision, see invisibility, true seeing, regenerate; Market Price: 52,000 gp; Weight: –.

Mithral Eye

 The mithral eye is a seemingly solid sphere of shiny silvery metal. It provides normal sight through the eye on command, allowing the wearer to basically turn the eye off when they wish to sleep. The mithral eye may be used to project the equivalent of an arcane eye, however once the duration of the normal arcane eye spell expires, the magical qualities eye will be inert for one hour, including normal sight.

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells arcane eye; Price: 18,000 gp; Weight: –.

Armor – Shells and Casings

Partial Armor

Most fighters will tell you that the only thing more valuable than their weapons is their armor. Without its protection most warriors wouldn’t last a minute in battle. So keeping your armor in good working repair is essential. But what happens if a significant portion of your armor is destroyed? Many hazards lie in wait in the fantasy world that can burn, melt, corrode or rust away pieces of this valuable protection, leaving you with an incomplete suit of armor. Or, perhaps you are just starting your career of adventuring and are strapped for currency. So you begin collecting various salvageable pieces of armor from the brigands, bandits, orcs and hobgoblins that have crossed your path and you begin assembling an incomplete suit of “patchwork” armor.

In either case, what sort of protection can you receive from an incomplete suit of armor? What is your maximum movement rate, your percentage for arcane spell casting failure or your maximum Dexterity bonus while in your partial armor?

Partial Armor Guidelines

Here are a few rules/guidelines to go by when dealing with the issue of partial armor.

-If you wear 50% or less of a suit of armor’s total pieces, the armor provides no added protection (Armor Bonus) to your overall AC. However, the armor’s Maximum Dexterity Bonus increases by +2, Armor Check Penalty decreases by –2, Arcane Spell Failure decreases by –10% and the armor’s weight decreases by half.

-If you wear more than 50% of the armor’s total pieces, you receive the standard Armor Bonus to your over-all AC. However, you incur the armor’s full limits and restrictions AND you and your Gamemaster must keep a record of which specific body locations are not protected and thereby do not receive any protection against a Called Shot.

-Parts of the body that ARE covered by partial armor receive that armor’s full protection rating (Armor Bonus) if that area is targeted for a Called Shot. Leather gloves or boots protect hands and feet as if you are wearing leather armor and metal gauntlets or helms protect the hands or head as if you are wearing half-plate armor.

-If an armored Body Location is rolled for on a normal Critical Hit (not a Called Shot), then roll again. If the same spot is rolled a second time, it receives the Critical Hit and Effect. This reflects the likelihood of an unarmored area being affected by a Critical Hit rather than an armored area.

While the idea of scantily clad warriors wearing not much more than a number of key pieces of armor are often depicted in fantasy art, obviously, there is a definite down side to wearing only partial armor. Certainly individual pieces can be enchanted with various magical effects to help alleviate some of these shortcomings, but these are very costly. In general, you are better off saving your gold and investing in a complete suit of armor tailored to fit your needs and lifestyle.

Table 3-2: New Armor Types
Armor Cost Armor Bonus Max. Dex. Bonus Armor Check Penalty Arcane Spell Failure % Speed 30 ft. Speed 20 ft. Weight*
Armored Codpiece 5 gp +4 0 2 lbs.
Full Visor 10 gp 4 lbs.
Mithral Cloak 1,400 gp +4 +6 0 5% 30 ft. 20 ft. 15 lbs.
Piecemeal Armor






-Plate-style 400 gp +5 +2 -5 30% 20 ft. 15 ft. 35 lbs.
-Banded-style 175 gp +4 +3 -4 25% 20 ft. 15 ft. 20 lbs.
Spiked/Plated Collar 3 gp +4 1 lb.
Warcaster’s Armor 35 gp +4 +5 -3 10% 30 ft. 20 ft. 15 lbs.

* Weight is for armor built for medium-sized creatures.

Armored Codpiece: A single-piece garment worn to protect the groin area. Some are over-sized and gaudy while others are slim and can easily be worn under most outer clothes. Although a codpiece does not provide any additional AC bonuses, it does provide the listed Armor Bonus against any Called Shot to the groin area.

Full Visor: A full visor completely covers the wearer’s face leaving only a small slit for vision. This makes the user almost completely immune to Called Shots to the eyes and face. (Called Shot penalty to eyes equals –15) It also makes it very hard for the wearer to see. The wearer suffers a -2 penalty to initiative and all skill or ability checks that involve vision, but receives a +2 circumstance bonus to saves against gaze attacks.

Mithral Cloak: Ideal for spellcasters or anyone who can’t take the time to don a full suit of armor, a mithral cloak is a fine-mesh cloak that is composed of small interlocked mithral rings. This full-length chainmail-style cloak and cowl is equipped with a padded inner lining designed to prevent chafing and soften blows.

Piecemeal armor: This is a standard suit of padded leather with a number of metal plates strategically placed along arms, legs, chest and back. Plate and banded styles are common, although other styles are not unheard of. While these armors don’t protect the wearer as well as full suits of each type, they do allow the wearer greater flexibility and are considerably cheaper. If a suit of piecemeal armor is found, there is a 90% chance that the right arm is armored.

-Plate-style piecemeal armor incorporates certain key pieces of standard full plate armor that protects specific areas from Called Shots as if the wearer were suited in full plate armor (AC +8). Areas protected are: lower legs (shin and hamstring), knees, torso (front and back), and either the entire right (90%) or left (10%) arm and shoulder.

-Banded-style piecemeal armor incorporates a number of pieces of standard banded mail armor that protects specific areas from Called Shots as if the wearer were suited in banded mail armor (AC +6). Areas protected are: shins, knees and thighs, torso (front and back), forearms and either the right (90%) or left (10%) shoulder and elbow.

Spiked/Plated Collar: This is often a wide strap of leather with sharp studs riveted throughout, worn around the neck. Other forms have small overlapping metal plates or scales. While the collar provides no over-all AC Bonus, it does provide the listed Armor Bonus against attacks directed specifically to the throat and neck.

Warcaster’s armor: Spellcasters on the battlefield are always vulnerable to melee attack, but seldom wear armor because it impedes their spellcasting abilities. This form of armor is specifically designed to provide the spellcaster with some amount of added protection while causing as little interference with their complex spell weaving as possible. A “suit” of warcaster’s armor consists of five separate pieces. Two fluted bracers (a combination of vambrace and coudi’ere) to cover the forearms and elbows, two fluted leggings (a combination of grevi’ere and genouilli’ere) to cover the shins, calves and knees and a fifth piece, a small, fluted shoulder piece (a combination gorget and epauliere) that covers the top of the shoulders down to the collar bone and shoulder blades and up to protect the neck. Some elaborate pieces extend up to protect the back of the head as well.

Magical Armors

Wilderness Armor: Originally designed for rangers who require stealth and protection, wilderness armor provides the wearer with the best of both worlds. Wilderness armor is a suit of +3 leather armor, however when worn and the command word spoken, this armor polymorphs into a suit of +3 half-plate armor. The transformation takes only one round to complete and can be activated as a free action. The armor can switch from one form to the other as often as needed.

Aura: moderate transmutation

CL 10th; Feats: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, polymorph; Price: 25,350; Cost: 12,675 gp + 725 XP.

Cloak of the Kyton: This is a +3 blackened mithral cloak and cowl with four shinning, animated spiked chains attached to it, near the shoulders. The wearer may (3/day) mentally command one or more of these weapons to animate and attack anyone within range. The spiked chains are +1 to attack and damage and function as if they are dancing weapons, however they remain connected to the cloak and may only strike at targets that are within 5 ft. (i.e. an adjacent square) and are not considered reach weapons.

Aura: faint transmutation

CL 10th; Feats: Craft Magic Armors and Armor, animate objects; Price: 13,250 gp; Cost: 6,350 gp + 790 XP.

Mobility Armor: A paladin is immune to diseases but not personal injury; he can break an arm or leg just like the rest of us. Mobility armor was originally designed for the paladin suffering from such a setback. Upon donning the armor’s helm and uttering a command word, the rest of the armor blinks onto the paladin’s body, enabling the wounded paladin to don his magical armor instantly without causing further damage to his broken limb(s). Once on, the paladin’s limbs are held immobile inside the armor and he moves about by mentally commanding the armor to move. In effect, it’s as if the signals from the paladin’s brain were going straight to the armor rather than to his own muscles, while his body is held in stasis-like traction inside the mobility armor.

This type of armor is always a suit of +1 full plate with a great helm, providing AC 19. The helm must be worn to control the mobility armor; without it, the armor is no different than any other suit of +1 full plate. While wearing the helmet, the paladin moves about in the armor as if completely unwounded, walking with a broken leg, swinging a weapon or holding a shield with a broken arm, and so on. Should the wearer receive a debilitating injury while wearing this armor, she will not suffer from any penalties from that injury. Of course, once the armor is removed all penalties from the injury apply.

Movement is restricted to things the paladin would be able to do normally; he cannot mentally control the armor to make himself levitate, move at superhuman speeds, fly, etc. (Naturally, subsequent spells cast upon the paladin in the mobility armor can grant such movement types.)

When the paladin wishes to remove the armor, he commands it to blink off of him, and the armor teleports to the ground at his feet. Once the armor is removed, the paladin must once again deal with his broken limb(s). Mobility armor can only be mentally controlled while being worn; the paladin cannot wear the helmet and command the rest of the armor to move about while he’s not in it (or while someone else is wearing the armor).

For obvious reasons, mobility armor is prized by those paladins who strive for glory in battle. Many religious orders have a suit or two of mobility armor stashed away for times when one of their paladins needs it, as this type of magical armor is really only useful to those already wounded. It provides no real advantage to fully healthy individuals (save the +1 armor bonus), although the quick-donning and -doffing abilities come in handy. Naturally, while originally built for use by warrior paladins, there is nothing preventing the use of mobility armor by members of other classes allowed to wear heavy armor.

Aura: moderate transmutation and abjuration

CL 5th; Feats: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, animate objects, blink, gentle repose; Price: 38,650 gp; Cost: 19,125 gp + 990 XP.

New Magical Armor and Shield Qualities

Dulling: This enchantment can be applied to bucklers, shields and armor. Any failed attack against a creature wearing or utilizing one of these protective devices causes the attackers weapon to make a Saving Throw (DC13), failure causes the weapon to dulled and its critical threat range is reduced by –1. This affect is cumulative (minimum of 20). A dulling shield can then be used to make a shield bash against an opponent’s edged weapon. If the attack is successful, the opponent’s weapon must make a Saving Throw against the attack roll or be dulled as above.

Aura faint transmutation

CL 3rd; Feats: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, soften earth and stone; Price: +2 bonus.

Fortified: Armor with this quality gains a +2 bonus against a specific type of special quality damage (i.e. slashing, piercing or bludgeoning). This grants the creature a bonus to the saving throw to ignore such effects, however this does not grant any added Damage Reduction (see the Armor as Damage Reduction section for more details). Light armor can have this quality applied once, Medium armor twice and Heavy armor up to four times. It is possible to fortify a single suit of armor against multiple attack forms. Each application stacks with the one before it, granting a cumulative saving throw adjustment. (Example: a suit of Plate armor, Fortified +4 vs. Piercing and +2 vs. Bludgeoning)

Aura: moderate transmutation

CL 5th; Feats: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, fortify armor; Price: +1 bonus/ application if done all at once OR +2 bonus/ application if done at a later time.

Sidebar: Armor Bracing

For an additional 80 gold pieces any suit of heavy armor can be fashioned to include bands of extra thick steel bracing. These supports are strategically placed throughout the suit offering increased defense against all kinds of crushing or constricting damage. Any time a creature, trap, or critical hit would be able to deal such damage the attacker must first make a Strength check (DC 24). If the check is successful, the bracing is destroyed and damage is dealt as normal, but if it fails, the bands prevent the wearer from suffering any damage from the attack. Though a wearer of a braced suit of armor may escape damage from crushing and/or constriction, they are still considered grappled or otherwise hindered by many such attacks.

Armor bracing decreases a suit’s maximum Dexterity bonus and armor check penalty by –1 and increases the chance of arcane spell failure by +5% and its weight by +15 lbs. Suits with their interior banding destroyed cannot be repaired, though they still function as normal armor the wearer sufferers all the penalties of having braces but none of the benefits.

Variant System: Using Armor as Damage Reduction

Truth be known, it is just as easy to strike an armored opponent, as it is an unarmored one. Realistically, armor does not provide the wearer with any protection from getting hit. What armor actually does is help the wearer from taking less (sometimes a lot less) damage from the blows that do hit. The variant system presented below is based on this concept.

When using this system the Armor Bonus granted by wearing armor does not apply to your Armor Class (making you easier to hit), however wearing armor does grant you a Base Damage Reduction equal to the Armor Bonus of the armor. This Base DR applies to most any physical damage inflicted by weapon, device or natural attack.

Example: Two fighters, one unarmored and the other wearing chainmail armor, are both hit by a warhammer for 6 hit points apiece. The unarmored fighter takes the full 6 hit points while the armored fighter takes only 1 hit point. (6 minus the +5 modifier for the chainmail = 1)

Armor Class or Damage Reduction?

Which protective items apply their bonuses to your AC and which ones apply to your Base DR? The table below is a breakdown of which applies to what.

Magic Armor enchantments can either add to Armor Class or Base DR (determined at the time of creation). Special abilities added to armors via market price modifiers have no affect on Base DR or AC.

Note: Armor cannot have its DR increased by more than half its Base DR (rounded down). For example the most Base DR you could add to a suit of chainmail would be +2.

Table 3-3: Armor Class vs. Base Damage Reduction Qualifiers
Type Armor Class Base DR
Armor Bonus

(Example: chainmail has an Armor bonus of +5 = 5 Base DR)

No Yes
Shield Bonus Yes No
Magic Armor enchantments that modify AC Yes No
Magic Armor enchantments that modify Base DR No Yes
Magical Items (that provide a bonus to AC)* Yes No
Natural Armor Yes No

*Bracers of armor and similar items that grant a bonus to AC do not function in that manner when worn in conjunction with armor. While you can wear a protective magic item in conjunction with armor, you can only gain the AC benefit from the magic item(s) OR the Base DR from the armor. Whichever value is greater takes precedence and the other is nullified. Any other special abilities of either the armor or the magic item(s) still function as normal.

How this system affects magic armor qualities

When using this system, you may find that almost every character (if given the option) will go with bracers of armor over actual armor due to fewer penalties being associated with bracers than with armor. In order to help provide a rationale for players to make the conscious decision to choose to wear armor over not wearing armor, certain adjustments to magic armor qualities need to be addressed. These changes are as follows.

Dexterity Adjustment: This increases equal to the amount of enchantment of the armor. For example, scale mail +2 would have a maximum Dex adjustment of +5 (normally only +3).

Armor Check Penalties: These decrease equal to the amount of enchantment of the armor. For example, scale mail +2 would have an armor check penalty of -2 (normally -4).

Note: If you are using the Weightless armor quality (from Arms & Armor by Bastion Press, Inc) the Dexterity Adjustment and Armor Check Penalty adjustments detailed do not stack with the benefits listed above. Arcane spell failure reduction still applies, though.

Special Attacks

These fall into two categories: Critical Hits and Effects and Magic Weapon Special Abilities. Rules for each are given below.

Critical Hits and Effects: Creatures that suffer a Critical Hit while wearing armor retain their Base DR, reducing the amount of damage they suffer, however wearing armor in no way hinders any possible Critical Effects the wearer may incur. Remember that the armor’s Base DR applies to the total damage done by the hit and not to each multiplier of the Critical Hit.

Magic Weapon Special Abilities: Some weapons have the ability to sever or crush the limbs from opponents on a successful hit (i.e. vorpal weapons). Wearing armor now gives the creature a chance to avoid such pitfalls. The chance to avoid this ability is as follows:

Creatures struck must make a saving throw (DC 15*) using their Base DR¨ as a bonus (modifier). If the save succeeds, the special quality (but not the damage) is negated. If the save is failed, the usual effects occur.

Note: If the hit in question is a successful Critical Hit, than any special abilities should apply as normal with no chance of avoidance through the use of armor.

¨Armors can be strengthened by enchanting, as detailed above (see the Armor Class or Damage Reduction section). Thus, it’s possible for scale mail to have a DR of 6 and full plate to have a DR of 12.

* Some special-quality weapons may have a more difficult DC to resist their effects. These modifiers are left to the judgment of the Gamemaster.

Stackable…. but separate

What if a creature, such as a lycanthrope or demon, which already has extraordinary (Ex) or supernatural (Su) Damage Reduction (DR) now dons armor? How does the armor’s Base DR and the creature’s regular DR affect each other? The effects stack, however while the regular DR of the creature can usually be bypassed by some particular kind of material or enchantment, the Base DR of the armor still remains intact.

Example: A werewolf (DR 10/silver) wears a suit of chainmail (Base DR 5). Two adventurers attack the lycanthrope, one wielding a normal greatsword, the other wielding silver greataxe. Both are lucky and hit, each doing maximum damage. Unfortunately for the adventurers, the damage from the greatsword (12 hp) is fully ignored (DR 10/silver + Base DR 5 = an overall DR of 15). However, the damage from the silver greataxe (10 hp) cannot be ignored and the creature takes 5 hit points damage from the blow (10 hp – Base DR 5 = 5 hp). Since the greataxe is silver it ignores the werewolf’s regular DR, but it is still partially protected by the armor’s Base DR.

Critical Characters

Marksman

The marksman is a specialist, an individual feared by even the most heavily armored. He excels at finding the weak spots in the armor of his opponent, the open areas where he can strike, or the tiny window of opportunity where he can use his speed and finesse to make a critical attack. He is a master of his chosen weapon and wields it almost effortlessly in combat, choosing his mark with surgical precision. Marksmen are good at close quarters combat where opponents may not have a lot of room to easily move, thus making for a better target. Rogues and fighters are those most common classes that go on to become marksmen.

Hit Dice: d6

Requirements

To qualify to become a marksman, a character must meet the following:

Abilities: Dex 16+

Base Attack Bonus: +6 or better

Skills: Acrobatics 5 ranks

Feats: Lightning Reflexes, Weapon Focus

Class Skills

The marksman’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are: Acrobatics (Dex), Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Disable Device (Int), Escape Artist (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Perception (Wis), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), and Use Magic Device (Cha).

Skill points at each level: 5 + Int modifier

Table 4-1: Marksman
Level Base Attack Bonus Fort Save Ref Save Will Save Special
1 +0 +0 +2 +0 Weapon of Choice
2 +1 +0 +3 +0 Called Strike (+1)
3 +2 +1 +3 +1 Bonus feat
4 +3 +1 +4 +1 Called Strike (+2)
5 +3 +1 +4 +1 Enhanced Critical
6 +4 +2 +5 +2 Bonus feat, Called Strike (+3)
7 +5 +2 +5 +2 Greater Critical
8 +6 +2 +6 +2 Called Strike (+4)
9 +6 +3 +6 +3 Bonus feat, Greater Enhanced Critical
10 +7 +3 +7 +3 Called Strike (+5)

Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

A Marksman is proficient with all simple and martial weapons and light armor only. Armor penalties are applicable for any armor heavier than leather.

Bonus Feat

A marksman gains a bonus feat of his choosing (any prerequisites must be met) from the bonus fighter feats at 3rd, 6th and 9th levels.

Weapon of Choice: Choose one weapon of a size category equal to your own. You treat this weapon as a light weapon for purposes of two-weapon fighting, and you can select it for the Weapon Finesse feat. You can even use it in a grapple or when swallowed by a creature.

Called Strike (Ex)

At 2nd level and every other level after, the marksman gains an incremental +1 attack bonus to all Called Shots.

Enhanced Critical (Ex)

At 5th level, all damage inflicted by a critical hit from the marksman’s weapon of choice increases by a factor of one (for example, increasing to x3 rather than x2).

Greater Critical (Ex)

At 7th level, the threat range of the marksman’s weapon of choice triples. For example, a longsword normally threatens on a roll of 19-20. In the hands of a marksman, the threat range becomes 15-20. This ability does not stack with other feats or magical methods that may increase the threat range of a weapon including Enhanced Critical.

Greater Enhanced Critical (Ex)

At 9th level, the marksman makes attacks with near-surgical precision. The threat range of his weapon of choice quadruples and all damage inflicted by a critical hit increases by a factor of two from its original base statistics. Using a longsword as an example, the threat range would move from 19-20 to 13-20 and the critical hit multiplier would go from x2 to x4. This ability does not stack with other feats or magical methods that may increase the threat range of a weapon including Enhanced Critical and Greater Critical.

Campaign World Suggestions

Futuristic: The marksman makes an ideal infantry support character. His called shot bonuses and critical hit advantages make him very effective with ranged energy weapons or even close combat melee weapons.

Modern: Marksmen make ideal lone agents in spy-oriented campaigns or can serve as elite members of a task force assigned to engage especially tough creatures in a d20 Modern setting. They will most likely serve as snipers, but may be part of a covert close-quarters attack squad.

Spiritual Healer

The spiritual healer represents all that is good in the world by willfully aiding the sick, weak and injured. Often coming from the clerical class, spiritual healers feel the call to help treat individuals who have been subjected to wounds or injuries or even disease. She will use her skills to deliver first aid, care, and the making of teas and poultices to heal any living creature that bears no malice upon the world. A spiritual healer is welcome in any town and by nearly every humanoid race. She often journeys from place to place, traveling to where she is needed most no matter the risk or the distance.

Hit Die: d8

Requirements

To qualify to become a spiritual healer, a character must meet the following:

Alignment: Any good

Base Attack Bonus: +4 or better

Skills: Heal 7 ranks, Profession (herbalist) 5 ranks

Spells: Ability to cast 2nd-level divine spells

Special: Must have access to the Healing domain

Class Skills

The spiritual healer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are: Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Perception (Wis), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int) and Survival (Wis).

Skill points at each level: 4 + Int modifier

Table 4-2: Spiritual Healer
Level Base Attack Bonus Fort Save Ref Save Will Save Special Spells per Day
1 +0 +2 +0 +2 Skill bonus, Divine Oath +1 level of existing class
2 +1 +3 +0 +3 Bonus feat, Diagnose Aliment  
3 +2 +3 +1 +3 Skill bonus. Hands of the Healer +1 level of existing class
4 +3 +4 +1 +4 Restore Mind  
5 +3 +4 +1 +4 Skill bonus, Lay to Rest +1 level of existing class
6 +4 +5 +2 +5 Bonus feat, Brew Healing Tonic  
7 +5 +5 +2 +5 Skill bonus, Renown Healer +1 level of existing class
8 +6 +6 +2 +6 Restore Sanity  
9 +6 +6 +3 +6 Skill bonus, Extraordinary Healer +1 level of existing class
10 +7 +7 +3 +7 Bonus feat, Revival  

Class Features

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Spiritual healers are proficient with all simple weapons and light armor only.

Spells: A spiritual healer maintains close ties to her deity or tenets and continues to gain one level in divine magic from her previous class at the rate of every two levels of spiritual healer. The healer only gains new spells and no other benefits associated with that previous class.

Bonus Feat

A spiritual healer gains a bonus divine feat of her choosing (any prerequisites must be met) from any Gamemaster approved source at 2nd, 6th and 10th levels.

Skill bonus: At first level and every other level afterwards, a spiritual healer gains a +2 competence bonus to one of the following skills: Diplomacy, Heal, Knowledge (nature), Knowledge (religion), Profession (herbalist), or Spellcraft. A skill may be chosen more than once if so desired; the bonuses stack.

Divine Oath: The spiritual healer makes a sacred oath to care for and heal the living and destroy any undead. She must hold true to the tenets and ideals of good by giving aid to those in need, providing comfort and compassion to the wounded, and never willingly doing harm to a patient. As long as she follows her Oath, she receives a +3 circumstance bonus to all Heal skill checks.

Diagnose Aliment (Ex)

At 2nd level, a spiritual healer may make a Heal check to properly assess and diagnose the nature or cause of an injury or illness in a patient. A successful attempt (based upon the table below) allows the healer to accurately determine the source or underlying cause of the aliment. In the case of poisons, the Heal DC equals the DC of the saving throw for that particular poison. The spiritual healer also gains a +2 competence bonus on further Heal checks when treating the identified condition or wound.

Heal DC Diagnosis
15 Physical external injury (laceration, compound fracture, etc.)
20 Physical internal injury (broken bone, internal bleeding, ruptured organ, etc.)
20 Mental trauma (shock, concussion, dazed, etc.)
20 Spell-like effect (charms, enchantments, etc.)
25 Disease (may identify specific disease)

Hands of the Healer (Ex)

Upon reaching 3rd level, a spiritual healer’s skills become more refined. All spells that restore lost hit points heal an additional point of damage per spiritual healer class level. This may exceed the maximum points allowed by the spell. Additionally, the spiritual healer gains a +1 circumstance bonus to all Heal checks.

Restore Mind (Su): Spiritual healers work to heal the mind as well as the body. At 4th level, she can break enchantment, as per the spell, once per week.

Lay to Rest (Su): When an individual cannot be saved, a spiritual healer will take steps to ensure the body (or spirit associated with it) can never be raised as any kind of undead. At 5th level, a spiritual healer may lay to rest, as the spell, any corpse at will.

Brew Healing Tonic (Ex)

At 6th level, a spiritual healer has learned what herbs and plants may be effectively brewed into a concoction that promotes healing. As a result, she gains a +3 competence bonus to all Profession (herbalist) checks. Furthermore, three times per day the spiritual healer may brew a herbal healing tea (DC 15) that will restore 2d10 hit points or cure any non-magical disease for anyone who drinks it within two hours of its preparation. The process of brewing the tonic takes 3d6 minutes to properly ready and heat.

Renown Healer: At 7th level, the spiritual healer’s reputation for compassion and caring for the sick and injured is well known. All Charisma-based skill checks receive a +2 circumstance bonus.

Restore Sanity (Su): A spiritual healer is capable of restoring individuals who are stricken with a mental disease or under the influence of mind-affecting spells. At 8th level, she may restore sanity, as the spell restore sanity (with no loss of XP), once a week to individuals in need.

Extraordinary Healer (Su): At 9th level, the ability of a spiritual healer to cure the afflictions and heal the hurts of others becomes almost divine. Once each per day, she may cast heal, greater restoration, and regenerate. These spells are not considered part of her normal spells per day limits.

Revival (Ex)

The spiritual healer’s abilities reach a crescendo at 10th level. She now has a limited ability to restore the dead, provided that the subject has not been dead for too long. The spiritual healer must make a Heal check (DC 15 + number of minutes subject has been dead + amount of damage suffered beyond –10 hit points). If successful, the subject is restored to –9 hit points and stabilized, allowing for normal healing. However, if the Heal check fails, the subject cannot be revived and must be restored to life through magical means. The healer must be able to work on the physical body of the fallen subject (cannot have been disintegrated or destroyed) in order to restore life back to the body. A creature revived using the Heal skill does not lose a level or a point from Constitution.

Campaign World Suggestions

Futuristic: Spiritual healers double as field medics or even starship medical officers. They are a vital component to any collection of individuals whether they are a group of explorers making planetfall on a remote uninhabited world or assisting military operatives serving as shock troops investigating an abandoned and derelict floating hulk.

Modern: The shaman-like abilities of the spiritual healer open up opportunities for a mystical style of campaign much in the styles of X-Files or Signs where there is more to the world than the common person knows about. The possibilities for psychological horror or mystery are plentiful.

Apothecary

The apothecary is a variant core class designed for use as a substitute healing class for campaigns that use little or no magic. He uses his skills in healing and his knowledge of medicinal herbs and plants to treat patients and cure their aliments.

Adventures: An apothecary adventures in order to gain knowledge and heal the sick or wounded. He studies and learns about the various plants that may be used for medicinal purposes, especially for accelerating the healing process.

Characteristics: Apothecaries do not cast spells. Their abilities are derived directly from the knowledge they have acquired, much like a wizard or loremaster, and not from a divine source. As they advance in level, their healing abilities improve and become more potent.

Although there is no formal restriction against it, heavy armor is eschewed in favor of less restrictive light or medium armor. The weight of heavy armor would inhibit the amount of medicinal supplies an apothecary could carry with him. This, in turn, would affect the number of people who may be treated and prevent the healer from being as effective as he potentially could be.

Alignment: Apothecaries will always maintain a lawful or non-chaotic alignment. They are the ones who have been charged with curing the population’s ills and wounds and do so with great pride. An apothecary seeks to uphold the ideal of never turning away someone in need of medical attention.

Religion: An apothecary may worship any deity whose ambitions do not contradict the tenets of providing aid to the needy. Deities who have an interest in the Healing domain are the typical recipients of an apothecary’s worship, praise and devotion.

Background: Those who have strong, compassionate souls and a genuine desire to help others become apothecaries. They often come from educated backgrounds and carry books filled with medieval cures. They also have an affinity with nature and recognize the abilities that many plants have to cure and heal.

Races: Elves and halflings have an affinity towards the healing arts. Their compassionate nature and strong intellects make them natural candidates. Humans also follow the path to becoming an apothecary, using their adaptability and familiarity with other races to walk freely among them and treat those in need.

Other Classes: Clerics and druids have a mutual respect for apothecaries and their desire to use nature’s gifts to heal others. Apothecaries have cordial relations with paladins, viewing them with a measure of respect for their common ideals of protecting and saving the innocent, but at the same time disdaining their willingness to slaughter in the name of their deity.

Role: The apothecary enjoys considerable flexibility. They are not constrained to certain conditions like a spellcaster, but neither do they live nor die by their weapon. They are a one-person support unit for a party of adventurers. When party members become wounded, the apothecary is there to assist them, making him welcome at any adventuring party’s camp.

Table 4-3: The Apothecary
Level Base Attack Bonus Fort

SaveRef SaveWill SaveSpecial1+0+2+0+2Skill bonus2+1+3+0+3Diagnose aliment3+2+3+1+3Brew healing tonic4+3+4+1+4Skill bonus5+3+4+1+4Expeditious Recovery6+4+5+2+5
7+5+5+2+5Critical healing8+6/+1+6+2+6Skill bonus9+6/+1+6+3+6
10+7/+2+7+3+7Expeditious Recovery (x2)11+8/+3+7+3+7
12+9/+4+8+4+8Skill bonus13+9/+4+8+4+8Critical healing (x2)14+10/+5+9+4+9
15+11/+6/+1+9+5+9Expeditious Recovery (x3)16+12/+7/+2+10+5+10Skill bonus17+12/+7/+2+10+5+10
18+13/+8/+3+11+6+11
19+14/+9/+4+11+6+11Critical healing (x3)20+15/+10/+5+12+6+12Skill bonus

Game Rule Information

Apothecaries have the following game statistics.

Abilities: Intelligence and Wisdom are an apothecary’s key abilities. High scores in both are vital to successful skill checks involving both knowledge and healing.

Alignment: Any lawful or non-chaotic.

Hit Die: d6.

Class Skills

The apothecary’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (all skills, taken individually) (Int), Perception (Wis), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis) and Survival (Wis).

Skill Points at 1st Level: (5+Int modifier) x 4.

Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Class Features

All of the following are class skills of the apothecary.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Apothecaries are proficient with all simple weapons, and light and medium armor only.

Skill bonus: At first level and every third level afterwards, an apothecary gains a +2 competence bonus to any single apothecary class skill. A skill may be chosen more than once if so desired; the bonuses stack.

Diagnose Aliment (Ex)

At 2nd level, an apothecary may make a Heal check to properly assess and diagnose the nature or cause of an injury or illness in a patient. A successful attempt (based upon the table below) allows the healer to accurately determine the source or underlying cause of the aliment. In the case of poisons, the Heal DC equals the DC of the saving throw for that particular poison. The apothecary also gains a +2 competence bonus on further Heal checks when treating the identified condition or wound.

Heal DC Diagnosis
15 Physical external injury (laceration, compound fracture, etc.)
20 Physical internal injury (broken bone, internal bleeding, ruptured organ, etc.)
20 Mental trauma (shock, concussion, dazed, etc.)
20 Spell-like effect (charms, enchantments, etc.)
25 Disease (may identify specific disease)

Brew Healing Tonic (Ex)

At 3rd level, an apothecary has learned what herbs and plants may be effectively brewed into a concoction that promotes healing. As a result, he gains a +3 competence bonus to all Profession (herbalist) checks. Furthermore, three times per day the apothecary may brew a herbal healing tea (DC 15) that will restore 2d10 hit points or cure any non-magical disease for anyone who drinks it within two hours of its preparation. The process of brewing the tonic takes 3d6 minutes to properly ready and heat.

Expeditious Recovery (Ex)

The abilities of an apothecary to treat wounds in a proper manner allows for accelerated healing. When treating a critical wound, the healing time is reduced by a number of days equal to the Wisdom modifier of the apothecary. At 10th level, it is reduced by two times the Wisdom modifier and at 15th level, three times the Wisdom modifier, respectively.

Critical Healing (Ex)

An apothecary gains the ability to heal wounds inflicted by critical hits. All factor level Heal skill checks are performed using the next lower factor level DC when treating critical wounds. Any appropriate modifiers are still applicable, as only the base DC changes.

For instance, if an apothecary wanted to heal Thunderhead’s broken leg (from the earlier example), the base DC for short-term care factor level 1 would be 15 rather than 20. There would still be an additional +11 in modifiers (+3 due to severe wounds and +8 due to a Moderate bludgeoning critical effect) but the overall DC is reduced.

At each selected level of advancement, the base factor level DC is reduced another level. This means at 13th level, the base DC for factor level 2 short-term care would be 20 rather than 25. Furthermore, at 19th level, the base DC for a factor level 3 short-term care becomes 25 rather than 30.

Campaign World Suggestions

An apothecary has universal appeal and application across nearly all campaign settings. In settings where technology plays a prevalent role in treating the sick and wounded, the apothecary’s Knowledge and Heal skills provide solid bonuses to using those items to heal the wounded. In worlds where magic is non-existent such as the modern espionage or historical-based campaigns, the apothecary can be the difference between life and death for some since there is no reliance upon magical healing methods.

Feats

The ability to utilize feats is one of the more popular aspects of the d20 system. Combat-related feats are frequently utilized to increase the potential of hitting a target, invoking more damage, or even decreasing the likelihood of your character being attacked and wounded. This chapter presents new feats (including some from other open content sources) that may represent good choices for your character for combat and other purposes.

Ammunition Threat (General)

You can threaten an area when wielding certain ranged weapons.

Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +2 or higher.

Benefit: When wielding any kind of loaded crossbow or bow, you threaten nearby adjacent squares as if you wielded a melee weapon. When you have the chance to make an attack of opportunity, you may make a melee attack with the weapon’s ammunition (arrow or bolt), incurring a –4 nonproficiency penalty. An arrow or bolt is a Tiny weapon that deals 1d4 points of piercing damage (modified by Strength, enhancement bonuses, and other factors) with a critical hit multiplier of x2.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Normal: You can use an arrow or bolt as a melee weapon, but you do not threaten adjacent spaces when wielding a ranged weapon.

Critically Lucky (General)

You have the knack of avoiding being hit by critical attacks.

Prerequisites: Dex 15+, Lightning Reflexes

Benefit: When an opponent makes a successful critical hit, you are allowed a Reflex save (DC 10 + one half your opponent’s character level). If successful, you take only normal damage instead of critical damage because of your fast reflexes and incredible luck.

Enhanced Critical (General)

Your critical strikes do a greater amount of damage to your opponents.

Prerequisites: Proficient with selected weapon, Improved Critical with selected weapon, base attack bonus +10 or higher.

Benefit: All damage inflicted by a critical hit from the selected weapon increases by a factor of one (for example, increasing to x3 rather than x2).

Special: You may gain this feat multiple times. The effects do not stack. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a new type of weapon.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Fervent (General)

You do not fall easily from simple wounds

Prerequisites: Con 13+, Toughness

Benefit: You are not considered dead until your current hit point total falls a number of points below zero equal to your Constitution score. A character with a Constitution of 16, for instance, is not considered dead until his hit points fall to –16, not –10.

Normal: When a character’s current hit points drop to –10 or lower, he’s dead.

Great Pierce (General)

You wield ranged weapons with such skills that you can endanger multiple foes with one attack.

Prerequisites: Dex 13+, Pierce, Point-Blank Shot, Precise Shot

Benefit: As Pierce, except that your ranged attack may continue on to the next creature in line and in range indefinitely, so long as you down each creature in turn.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Greater Critical (General)

You not only know where to hit an opponent with a single weapon, but you do it with greater ease than most others.

Prerequisites: Proficient with selected weapon, Improved Critical with selected weapon, base attack bonus +12.

Benefit: When using the weapon you have selected, your threat range triples. For example, a longsword normally threatens on a roll of 19-20. If a character using a longsword has this feat, the threat range becomes 15-20.

Special: You may gain this feat multiple times. The effects do not stack. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a new type of weapon.

This effect does not stack with any other effect that expands the threat range of a weapon (such as the keen edge spell).

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Hamstring (General)

You know how to strike with painful precision to hobble your foes.

Prerequisites: Sneak attack, base attack bonus +5 or higher.

Benefit: Once per round when you use a full-round action to make a single successful sneak attack, your opponent must make a successful Fortitude save (DC 10 + ½ your character level). If the save fails, the opponent is hobbled. The hobbled character’s speed is reduced by half and he suffers a –6 penalty to effective Dexterity. This penalty does not apply for actions such as ranged combat and spellcasting that do not require lower-body movement. In addition, a hobbled character is always considered flat-footed. A character is unaffected by this condition when flying, levitating, or otherwise moving without using his legs for support and mobility. This condition lasts until the opponent receives a successful Heal check (DC 10 + ½ your character level) or benefits from a spell that cures ability damage (lesser restoration, restoration, etc.). This feat can only be used against living creatures that can normally be affected by sneak attacks.

Perfect Shot (General)

You are adept at finding the most beneficial place to strike an opponent with a ranged attack.

Prerequisites: Dex 13+, Weapon Proficiency (selected ranged weapon), Point-Blank Shot, Precise Shot, Weapon Focus (selected ranged weapon), base attack bonus +3 or higher.

Benefit: When wielding the selected ranged weapon, you may add your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to damage rolls, even if the ranged weapon is not mighty. If you cannot normally apply your Strength modifier to damage (such as when using a crossbow), you can still apply your Dexterity modifier.

Your target must be within 30 feet. This feat does not help you when attacking creatures that are immune to critical hits – apply your Strength modifier (if normally allowed) to the damage roll as normal.

You can use this feat with melee weapon, but you can apply your Dexterity modifier to damage rolls only when you throw that weapon.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take this feat, it must apply to a new weapon.

Perfect Strike (General)

You are adept at finding the most beneficial place to strike an opponent in melee.

Prerequisites: Dex 13+, Weapon Proficiency (selected melee weapon), Point-Blank Shot, Precise Shot, Weapon Focus (selected melee weapon), base attack bonus +3 or higher.

Benefit: When wielding the selected melee weapon, you may add your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier to damage rolls. This feat does not help you when attacking creatures that are immune to critical hits – apply your Strength modifier to the damage roll as normal.

When you make off-hand attacks with the selected melee weapon, you add one-half your Dexterity modifier to damage instead of one-half your Strength modifier. However, when you make two-handed attacks with the selected weapon, you add only your Dexterity modifier to damage, not 1 ½ times your Dexterity modifier. This feat cannot be applied to thrown weapon attacks.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take this feat, it must apply to a new weapon.

Pierce (General)

You can send ranged weapon attacks through a target you kill, possibly striking a nearby foe.

Prerequisites: Dex 13+, Point-Blank Shot, Precise Shot.

Benefit: If you deal enough damage to an opponent with a ranged weapon attack to make it drop (typically by damaging it to below 0 hit points), the attack can pass through that opponent, possibly striking another creature behind it. The second creature must be directly behind the foe you downed along a straight line between you and the original target, within the weapon’s range. Make a normal ranged attack roll at the same bonus as the attack that downed the previous creature, taking into account any new range penalty, cover (the downed foe does not count), and concealment. If you hit, you deal damage as normal.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Pressing Attack (General)

You are skilled at seizing every advantage and keeping your opponent on the defensive.

Prerequisites: Combat Reflexes

Benefit: This feat allows you to follow an opponent who tries to step back from an area you threaten. The opponent must be in an area you threaten at the beginning of his action. If the opponent takes a 5-foot step to an area you do not threaten, you may immediately take a 5-foot step of your own to any unoccupied square where you again threaten the opponent. If no such space is available, you cannot use this feat. You may only use this feat once per round.

Rapid Healing (General)

You heal faster than most.

Prerequisites: Iron Will, Toughness

Benefit: You recover hit points and ability damage from rest and bed rest at twice the normal rate.

Normal: Characters without this feat heal 1 point per level per day from rest and 1 ½ points per level per day from bed rest. Temporary ability damage is normally restored at one point per day.

Strong Off-Hand Attack (General)

Your off-hand attacks are as strong as attacks with your preferred hand.

Prerequisites: Str 15+, Dex 15+, Power Attack.

Benefit: You add your full Strength bonus to damage dealt by your off-hand attacks. This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Normal: You add one-half your Strength bonus to damage dealt by your off-hand attacks.

Special: Creatures with multiple secondary attacks that take this feat add their full Strength bonus to damage dealt by all those attacks.

Strong Two-Handed Attack (General)

Your attacks with a two-handed weapon are especially devastating.

Prerequisites: Str 15+, Dex 15+, Power Attack, Cleave.

Benefit: When wielding a weapon two-handed, you add double your Strength bonus to damage dealt by that weapon. This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Normal: Your attacks while wielding a weapon two-handed add 1 ½ times your Strength bonus to damage.

Special: A creature with only one natural attack that takes this feat adds double its Strength bonus to damage dealt by that attack.

Unexpected Attack (General)

When the flow of a battle provides unexpected openings in your opponent’s defenses, you know how to make your attacks count.

Prerequisites: Combat Reflexes, Lightning Reflexes, base attack bonus +5 or higher.

Benefit: Your opponents lose their Dexterity bonus to Armor Class when you make attacks of opportunity.

Weapon of Choice (General)

Your skill with a weapon makes it seem feather-light in your hands.

Prerequisites: Dex 13+, Weapon Proficiency (selected weapon), Weapon Focus (selected weapon), base attack bonus +4 or higher.

Benefit: Choose one weapon of a size category equal to your own. You treat this weapon as a light weapon for purposes of two-weapon fighting, and you can select it for the Weapon Finesse feat. You can even use it in a grapple or when swallowed by a creature.

This feat may be chosen as a fighter bonus feat.

Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take this feat, it must apply to a new weapon.

Weapon Panache (General)

Choose one type of light melee weapon, such as a short sword. You are so brash and self-confident when wielding this weapon that you gain a bonus on attack rolls.

Prerequisites: Proficient with weapon, Weapon Focus (selected weapon), base attack bonus +1 or higher.

Benefit: With the selected weapon, you may add your Charisma modifier instead of your Strength modifier on attack rolls.

Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take the feat, it must apply to a new weapon.

Dire Castings

Scoring Critical Hits with Spells

Some spells and spell-like effects require the caster to aim the spell, usually a ranged touch attack, in order to affect the target just as if firing an arrow or throwing a dagger. Dexterity modifiers, base attack bonuses, the Weapon Focus [ray] feat and a number of different combat modifiers can influence the accuracy of these spells just as with any other weapon. So it stands to reason that when such an attack roll produces a natural 20 (an unmodified 20 on a d20), it constitutes a critical threat. Follow the core rules for determining a critical hit and calculating critical damage. See Critical Hits for additional information on critical hits and effects. Note that only the hit point damage done by the spell is doubled (x2). The number of creatures affected, duration and all other aspects of the spell go unchanged.

New Spells

Ar’ryn’s Eldritch Bolts

Evocation [force]; Level: sorcerer/wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 standard action
Components: V, S, M

EFFECTS

Range: medium (100 ft. + 10 ft. per caster level)
Target: special
Duration: see text
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: yes

From your fingertips fly glowing bolts of pure force that strike your target. Unlike magic missiles, these bolts do real physical damage (1d4 hp + 1 hp/ 2 caster levels). You can either hurl up to 5 such bolts in one round as a standard action OR choose to hurl one bolt per round (maximum of 5 rounds) as a free action.

You must successfully roll a ranged touch attack for each missile to strike your intended target, but you gain a +2 bonus to your attack rolls with these bolts and you suffer no range penalties.

Bloodletting

Necromancy; Level: cleric 4, Death 4, sorcerer/wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S, M

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./level)
Area: all living creatures within a 20 ft. cube
Duration: 1 round/level
Saving Throw: Fort negates; Spell Resistance: yes

This ghoulish spell allows the caster to place an invisible aura around a number of victims. Each must make a Fort save. Failure means that for the duration of the spell any wound caused by a slashing or piercing attack will continue to bleed profusely, dripping blood everywhere. This causes the victims to loose 1 hit point per wound each round until the spell ends. Regeneration, magical or otherwise, will not function during the spell’s duration, however most other magical healing will still work normally.

Bonebrittle

Necromancy; Level: cleric 5, Death 5, sorcerer/wizard 5

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S, M

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./level)
Area: all living creatures within a 20 ft. cube
Duration: 1 round/2 levels
Saving Throw: Fort negates; Spell Resistance: yes

When this spell is cast all creatures within the spells radius instantaneously flash with an x-ray effect. (This is only a visual effect with no other malevolent affects) Failure to make a Fortitude save results in the victim’s bones becoming temporarily weak and brittle. Any single blow from a blunt weapon causing 20 hit points or more OR any single blow from a slashing weapon causing 40 hit points or more will cause the victim to suffer a Moderate/Bludgeoning Critical Effect to a random body location, regardless of the weapon type used. Refer to Critical Hits and Effects to determine which area is affected.

Should any single blow upon the victim that causes the minimum damage listed above AND also qualify to cause a Critical Effect following the rules for the Severity level of that Critical Effect is automatically raised by one Factor Level, to a maximum of Serious.

Fortify Armor

Abjuration [force]; Level: cleric 4, paladin 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 standard action
Components: V, S, DF

EFFECTS

Range: touch
Target: one suit of armor
Duration: 1 hour/level
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: no

You fortify a single suit of armor with magical energies that help to protect the more vulnerable areas more effectively. If a Critical Hit or a Sneak Attack is scored against the wearer of the affected armor, there is a (base 30% + any magical pluses from the armor itself) chance that the extra damage is negated and only normal damage is applied. If a Critical Hit is still successful against the wearer, the Severity of any possible Critical Effects scored against the wearer is reduced by one Factor Level to a minimum of Mild.

Headsman’s Caress

Evocation [force]; Level: cleric 5, sorcerer/wizard 5

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S, M

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./level)
Target: one creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: yes

When you cast this spell, arm extended, you project a thin, electric-blue arc of energy towards a single target. You must make a ranged touch attack roll against the target’s normal AC. The arc has properties equivalent to a battleaxe +3, Keen, Vorpal weapon (i.e. 1d8 + 3 damage, 19-20/ x3, slashing, beheads target on a natural 20 attack roll). There are no range penalties, but firing into melee and other related penalties still apply.

Mortal Wound

Enchantment; Level: bard 3, cleric 4, sorcerer/wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./level)
Area: One creature
Duration: 1 round/level
Saving Throw: Will negates; Spell Resistance: yes

The victim of this spell must roll a successful Will save or immediately believe that the next blow/injury they suffer will be fatal and act accordingly for the duration of the spell. Should the victim actually take a hit (regardless if any real damage is done) it will fall unconscious, it’s conscious mind tricked into believing that it is dead. The victim will remain unconscious for the remainder of the spell’s duration and cannot be awakened by normal means, although a successful dispel magic spell will cause the victim to prematurely awaken.

Power Word: Bone-shatter

Necromancy; Level: cleric 4, Death 4, sorcerer/wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V

EFFECTS

Range: close (25 ft. + 5 ft./level)
Area: One creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Fortitude for less damage; Spell Resistance: yes

You speak a single word of power that causes a number of minor bones or chitin within the victim to crack and splinter causing 3d8 hit points of damage and 1d8 hit points of damage on the following round due to bone splinters causing internal damage. During these two rounds the victim suffers a reduction in movement rate by one half (flying creatures also lose 1 maneuverability category) and must roll a Concentration check (DC 16) in order to cast spells.

Those who roll a successful Fortitude save only suffer 2d6 hit points, a reduction in movement rate by one half (flying creatures also lose 1 maneuverability category) and must roll a Concentration check (DC 16) in order to cast spells for one round.

Shield-motes

Abjuration [force]; Level: sorcerer/wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 1 action
Components: V, S, M

EFFECTS

Range: Personal
Area: One creature
Duration: 1 hour/level or until discharged
Saving Throw: none; Spell Resistance: no

Casting this spell calls into being a number of small motes of softly glowing light that continually float about the caster in a random fashion. The spell creates 1 mote for every 2 caster levels. Each mote will intercept and deflect (cancel out) one physical attack directed toward the caster within a 2 ft. range. The motes can deflect most any weapon, but cannot deflect such attacks as falling or thrown boulders, crushing walls or non-solid attacks. Once an attack has been neutralized, the intervening mote winks out (dissipates) in a small flash.

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Taking critical damage from spells

Avoiding some spells, such as the infamous fireball, are all about getting the heck out of the way. Those who can run quickly, duck-and-roll or cower behind something large can avoid most or even all of the effect. But what if you really botch your save roll? In other words, you didn’t see it coming and took it square in the face. It stands to reason that you would take more damage than your light-footed ally, don’t you think?

To illustrate this situation (not to mention adding a little more realism to the Save mechanic) we have devised a variant rule that allows those who really botch their Save roll, and essentially catch a spell effect head-on, to take an additional amount of damage.

In order to use this rule the spell or spell-like effect in question must have the following:

* The spell must have a Reflex Save.

* The spell must do hit point damage.

Any additional effects of the spell apply to the victim(s) as normal. In order to qualify for critical damage from a spell, the victim must fail their saving throw by a factor of at least 5. Consult the table below for exact effects.

Table 4-4: Critical Spell Damage
Factor Level Severity
Failed save by 5 Mild: Victim takes an additional 1 hit point per die of the spell.
 Failed save by 10 Moderate: Victim takes an additional 2 hit points per die of the spell.
Failed save by 15 Serious: Victim takes an additional 3 hit points per die of the spell.

Remember, that if you choose to use this rule it should apply to characters, non-player characters and monsters alike.

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Tools of the Trade – Equipment and Weapons

Proper weapons and equipment is the key to survival for any character. Weapons specifically designed to do critical damage can give a player the edge he needs in a combat situation to die another day.

Table 5-1: New Weapon Types
Simple Weapons Cost Dmg (S) Dmg (M) Critical Range Weight* Type
Angon 2 gp 1d4 2d4 19-20/x2 20 ft. 3 lb. P
Crossbow, triple-threat 80 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x2 100 ft. 15 lb. P
Javelin, star-bite 310 gp 2d4 2d6 19-20/x3 20 ft. 3 lb. P
Mace, two-handed 20 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x2 15 lb. B
Pilam 2 gp 1d4 1d6 x3 20 ft. 4 lb. P
Sling shuriken (20)† 5 gp 1d4 1d4 x3 6 lb. S
Sling              
Stones, Stunning (20)† 1 gp 1d4 1d4 x2 -10 ft. 5 lb. B
Stiletto 4 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 1 lb. P
Martial Weapons              
Arrow (20)†              
Axehead 5 gp x2 7 lb. P
Ironshod 10 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x3 -60 ft. 20 lb. P
Lung Puncture 4 gp -1 -1 x2 -20 ft. 2 lb. P
Penetrating 3 gp 18-20/x3 -30 ft. 9 lb. P
Bardiche 30 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x2 9 lb. S
Gae Bolga 20 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 15 ft. 10 lb. P
Great Pole Axe‡ 50 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 25 lb. S/P
Greatsword, weighted 80 gp 1d12 2d8 18-20/x2 12 lb. S
Ogre Maul 70 gp 1d10 2d8 19-20/x3 50 lb. B/P
Poleaxe 20 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 12 lb. B/P/S
Exotic Weapons              
Bracerblades (ea.) 20 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 4 lb. S
Chainblade‡ 300 gp 1d6 1d8 17-20/x2 6 lb. S

* Weights are for Medium weapons. Small weapons are one half the weight, while Large weapons are two times the weight.

† These ammunitions alter the base weapon’s normal range and/or damage.

‡ Reach weapon.

Angon: A barbed javelin intended for throwing. Like a typical javelin, it can be used in melee combat, but not nearly as well (suffering –4 to melee attack rolls). The head of the javelin is characterized by a number of vicious barbs that inflict terrible wounds. When a critical hit is scored, in addition to extra damage, the angon has become embedded in the victim. This hinders combat (-2 to all actions until removed), but ripping the offending weapon out of a body causes additional 2d4 points of damage. Extracting an angon is even challenging for a skilled surgeon: a successful heal roll (DC 15) inflicts only 1d4 points of damage to the victim, while a DC 20 roll results in a clean operation without further damage.

Arrow, Axehead: These arrows have a small curved blade affixed to the head of the sha ft. In addition to causing Slashing damage instead of Piercing damage, Axehead arrows can be used to cut strings, ropes or vines from a distance.

Arrow, Ironshod: The shafts of these arrows are composed of thin, solid steel or cold iron, making them very heavy. So much so, that these arrows can only be fired by a composite longbow with a Strength rating of no less than +2. Even then the arrows range is greatly diminished;however they have great penetrating power.

Arrow, Lung Puncture: These arrows are hollow, often being crafted from bamboo, and have extremely narrow points designed to penetration bone. Short ranged, prone to breakage, and not particularly lethal, few warriors choose to use them. However, in the hands of a skilled archer, they are deadly indeed, capable of penetrating into the lungs and creating sucking chest wounds, the air quite literally seeping from the organ through the hollow weapon. A character scoring a critical hit inflicts no additional damage, but inflicts 1d6 points of temporary Constitution damage and, unless the victim makes a Fortitude save (DC 10 + archers ranged attack bonus), begins to feel his breath literally slipping away (see drowning rules). This effect supersedes and replaces any Critical Effect that may have normally occurred. Preventing a character from expiring in such a manner requires a Heal roll (DC 20).

Arrow, Penetrating: These exclusively elven arrows, made from the same light alloys as is elven chain, are weighted to rotate tightly in flight. The result is devastating, allowing a small band of archers to literally rip to shreds advancing columns of enemy troops. On a critical hit, the penetrating arrow does triple damage and rips right through the victim, continuing on its flight. The archer may make another attack roll to hit a second foe in the immediate flight path and no further than 10’ behind the first victim. The arrow cannot penetrate through a second victim, even if the attack roll should result in yet another critical hit. Unfortunately, the weight of the arrows and trajectory at which they must be fired in order to score penetrating hits greatly reduces the missiles effective range.

Bardiche: This is a heavy axe with a long, broad blade 2 to 3 ft. in length mounted by two rings onto a 4 ft. sha ft. This is a two-handed weapon when wielded by a medium-sized or smaller creature.

Bracerblades: These appear to be standard leather or metal bracers with a scythe-like or axe-like blade fixed along the length of the bracer. Each bracerblade can be used either as a weapon or defensively as a light shield. If two are used as weapons in the same round you suffer all penalties for using a two-weapon fighting style.

Chainblade: The chainblade has a handle and crosspiece like that of a sword with a 5 to 7 ft. long segmented blade. Segments are joined together by a slotted hinge that allows the blade as a whole to move freely along the thin axis while remain ridged along the flat, giving the weapon a snaky, whip-like motion.

Crossbow, triple-threat: This is a rare heavy crossbow with an extra wide stock. Not one, but three bolt grooves run down the length of the stock with an especially wide string release at its base. This allows for up to three bolts to be fired at once. The wielder must make three separate attack rolls, one for each bolt and all bolts must be fired at the same target. The triple-threat crossbow is rather bulky and requires two hands to fire it as well as load it. Also, because of it’s a size, small-sized creatures or smaller, regardless of strength, must level the weapon upon a sturdy base of some sort in order to properly aim the weapon. Fully loading the weapon is a full round action and provokes an attack of opportunity.

Gae bolga: A heavy shortspear with a wickedly barbed head, the gae bolga is a feared weapon wielded by the mightiest warriors of some barbarian tribes. When thrust into a wound, the barbs catch on the flesh and organs. When the spear is withdrawn, it tears the victim’s entrails out in a rather messy fashion. If you inflict a critical hit with a gae bolga, the weapon sticks in the wound. A character can remove a gae bolga by making a successful Strength check with a DC equal to half the damage inflicted by the critical hit. When the gae bolga is removed, it inflicts an extra 2d4 hit points of damage. This damage can be halved if removed surgically with a Heal check (DC 15).

Great Pole Axe: This mighty barbarian weapon is essentially a dual-bladed bardiche, with a 30-inch long blade on either end of a 5’ long sha ft. It can be used as either as a large axe to make slashing attacks, or with thrusting attacks as with a polearm. As a double weapon, one can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but one still incurs all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two-weapons. The weapon is heavy and must be used with two hands by any creature of Medium-size or smaller. If a character hits with a critical while charging, in addition to double damage he strikes as if he has the Improved Bull Rush feat, for which purposes he may use one-and-a-half his strength modifier when making opposed strength checks. A character with the Improved Bull Rush feat gets to double his strength modifier when making opposed strength checks.

Greatsword, weighted: This greatsword is a single edged blade with a weight just over half way up the length of the blade, attached to the back of the blade. The sword is weighted to such a finely balanced degree that it has no adverse effect on the wielder, however the extra weight allows the weapon more effective cutting power.

Javelin, star-bite: This is a masterwork javelin whose head hides a tension-cocked mechanism that drives barbs or blades out of the head of the weapon when it strikes a target, and a poison reservoir. When the haft is twisted off, the reservoir is revealed and poison may be added. The shaft is then screwed back into the head. The impact of the weapon striking a target triggers the mechanism that forces the barbs or jagged blades out into the target’s flesh, releasing the poison. In addition, the blades lock. Removing such a weapon deals 1d4 damage if it is carefully cut from the wound, or 2d4 if it is simply pulled free.

Mace, two-handed: This heavy weapon is designed to do two things well, destroy plate armor and break bones. On a critical hit, it does normal damage to any plate armor (or similar armor like a breastplate) in the area it strikes as well as the usual extra damage to the wearer.

Ogre Maul: A standard ogre maul is a Large exotic weapon, used for devastating double-handed attacks by Large-sized barbaric creatures of all types. Part hammer and part pickaxe, these weapons are massive clubs of raw iron, 7 ft. of crudely fashioned black metal topped with a blunt and pointed double-sided head. Any creature of medium-size or smaller struck by a critical hit from an ogre maul is thrown backwards in addition to taking the critical damage. Critically hit creatures are flung backwards 10 ft., suffering an extra 1d10 hit points of damage in addition to any critical damage suffered. Creatures flung backwards must roll a Reflex (DC 12) or fall prone. Creatures of medium-size whose Strength score is less than 20 cannot use this weapon, small-sized creatures cannot use this weapon regardless of Strength.

Pilam: This is a stocky javelin with a 2 ft. long, barbed steel rod as a spearhead. Although less aerodynamic than a standard javelin, the pilam has tremendous penetrating power. Upon a Critical Hit, along with whatever Critical Damage and Critical Effect, the pilam penetrates and embeds itself in the target’s shield (if it uses one) and weights it down as the spearhead bends, itself becoming useless. This does however make the shield encumbered and useless, negating its AC bonus. Extracting the pilam requires a Strength check (DC 14) and provokes an attack of opportunity. Because the spearhead often bends, becoming useless, the pilam is usually considered a disposable weapon so masterwork pilams are a rarity and magical ones are unheard of.

Poleaxe: This is a 5 ft. long polearm with a circular crosspiece near one end and a combination hammer, axe and spear weapon head at the other. This special weapon head allows for bludgeoning, slashing and piercing attacks. The kind of damage intended must be declared prior to each attack.

Sling shuriken: Sling shuriken are cunning creations of gnomish artisans. They are a combination of sling stone, spinning top and razorblade. When the shuriken is released from the sling, counterweights inside react against the spin and trigger the release of four viciously sharp blades. If aimed correctly, the sling shuriken’s blades slice into the target. However, if the sling shuriken blades are deployed an instant too late (i.e. the intended target is within 20 ft.), the shuriken will bounce off and inflict only normal sling bullet damage (bludgeoning).

Sling Stones, Stunning: Typically, sling stones are made of baked clay and are designed to injure or kill. However, some cultures use specialized weighted stones made from soft, unbaked clay designed to stun. This is particularly valuable when the victim needs to be taken alive, and as a result slavers in particular favor this ammunition. Wet clay is more limited in range (40 ft range increment instead of 50), but deals only subdual damage. On a critical hit, damage is doubled as normal, but the victim must make a Fortitude save (DC 10 + attackers base ranged attack bonus) or be considered Stunned for one round. Stunned characters can’t act and lose any Dexterity bonus to Armor Class, while attackers get a +2 bonus on attack rolls against a stunned opponent.

Stiletto: A dagger with an exceptionally long and thin blade designed to penetrate the joints and seems of armor. Stilettos gain a +2 bonus to attack rolls when used against Medium or Heavy armor. The stiletto is not balanced and cannot be thrown.

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Diamond Water Grinder

This 10-inch diameter grinding stone is mounted on an axel like a wheel. The stone itself is smooth polished and bonded with diamond dust. The lower half of the stone sits in a small water trough, while a flat metal brace-plate is mounted so it hovers just above the wheel and a steep angle. The axel is connected to a leather belt that leads to a foot wheel, thus when the foot wheel is pedaled, it turns the grinding stone though the water trough, keeping it wet. The speed the stone turns is dependant on how fast the device is pedaled. To sharpen an edged-weapon on the wheel, the blade is placed against the brace-plate and then fed into the wet, spinning stone; this gives the edge a very precise angle. Weapons sharpened on a diamond water grinder are so finely honed that their critical threat range is temporarily increased according to the sharpener’s Craft (weaponsmithing) Skill check.

Craft Skill Temporary Threat range Increase
DC 15 +1
DC 20 +2
DC 25 +3

Each time the weapon scores a successful critical hit, the edge is marred and becomes slightly dulled, reducing the critical threat range by –1 until the weapon returns to its normal critical threat range. Cost 500 gp; Weight 45 lb

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Magical Weapon Qualities

Breaking

Aura moderate transmutation; CL 10th

DESCRIPTION

This enchantment increases the threat range of a weapon by one. All critical hits inflicted with a weapon of breaking also inflict a Critical Effect, critical threat rolls less than a factor level of 3 are considered a Mild Severity. Only bludgeoning weapons can be enchanted with breaking.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Magic Arms and Armor, shatter; Price +2 bonus.

Precision

Aura faint divination; CL 1st

DESCRIPTION

This enchantment grants the weapon a +5 luck bonus to a roll that determines whether a hit is a Critical Hit or not. This enchantment provides no bonus for normal attack rolls, however the +5 may be used as a modifier to determine the Factor Level of a Critical Effect. Bows, crossbows and slings so enchanted bestow this power upon their ammunition.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Magic Arms and Armor, true strike; Price +1 bonus.

Steel-phase

Aura moderate transmutation; CL 10th

DESCRIPTION

This enchantment allows the weapon to pass through most any metal as if incorporeal, lead being the most common exception. This allows the weapon to ignore metal, nullifying AC bonuses for metal armor and shields (magical bonuses still apply, just not the base AC). This enchantment only applies to worked metals. Raw ores in rock or crystal are still fully affected by this weapon.

Bows, crossbows and slings so enchanted bestow this power upon their ammunition.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Magic Arms and Armor, passwall; Price +2 bonus.

Specific Magical Weapons

Wraith Blade

Aura moderate necromancy; CL 5th;

DESCRIPTION

This +1 dagger allows the wielder to make range touch attacks, in the guise of a wraith-like dagger, upon activation, which when successful deals 5d6 points of damage. The wielder then gains temporary hit points equal to the inflicted damage, but they may not exceed his maximum hit point total.

The cost of activation is the wielder taking 1d6 hit points of self-inflicted damage, which cannot be transferred as temporary hit points. The wielder may send the wraith-like dagger up to 150 feet from him, if it goes beyond that range it returns to the wielder’s side.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Magic Arms and Armor, spectral hand, vampiric touch; Price 19,902 gp; Cost 9,987 gp + 1,245 XP.

Corruptor

Aura strong necromancy; CL 7th;

DESCRIPTION

This reddish +3 unholy heavy mace appears as if stained and mistreated, yet it is a strong and hearty weapon. A dark aura is about the weapon, as draining the surrounding light. Upon striking a critical hit, the target must make a Fortitude save (DC 18) or she contracts the filth fever, which strikes immediately (no incubation period). The subject loses 1d3 Dex and 1d3 Con, per day, until cured.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Magic Arms and Armor, contagion, unholy blight; Price 74,112 gp; Cost 35,345 gp + 4,345 XP.

Taking Critical Damage from Mechanical Traps

The threat of mechanical traps, especially in dungeon environs, is a very real danger to adventurers. Arrows and spears thrusting forth from walls, ceiling or floors, scythe blades slashing out from doors or chests, trap doors dropping out from underneath the unaware, these are all well known hazards to experienced adventurers. Those who are quick enough, alert enough or just plain lucky enough can fully avoid these dangers.

But what about those unfortunates that are just not very fleet of foot, not very reactive or just not paying close enough attention to their surroundings. Everyone occasionally finds themselves distracted, sleepy or in a slight daze, especially after trudging through hundreds of yards or even many miles of dungeon corridors or trails. When in such a state it can be very easy to be caught off-guard by a mechanical trap. This situation can be illustrated by not only failing a Reflex save against a trap, but really botching it. In which case it stands to reason that you got hit square in the face with the trap’s effects.

If you roll a natural 1 on a Reflex save against a mechanical trap (i.e. spikes, crushing walls, falling blocks, etc.) you take one and a half times the normal damage for that trap. For those that botch their save against a pit trap, they take an additional 1d6 hit points damage plus they must roll another Reflex save. Failure means that the victim has taken a Critical Effect (bludgeoning/moderate). Roll a d6 and consult the table below.

Table 5-2: Critical Damage from Traps
Die Roll (1d6) Critical Effect
(1) Left Leg Broken bone. Victim’s movement rate drops by half, suffers a –8 penalty to any skill check involving that leg and loses all Dexterity bonuses to AC (if any).
(2) Right Leg Broken bone. Victim’s movement rate drops by half, suffers a –8 penalty to any skill checks involving that leg and loses all Dexterity bonuses to AC (if any).
(3) Left Arm Broken bone. Victim suffers a –8 penalty to any attacks or skill checks involving that arm.
(4) Right Arm Broken bone. Victim suffers a –8 penalty to any attacks or skill checks involving that arm.
(5) Head Cracked skull. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or loses consciousness for 2d4 minutes, but suffers no other ill affects after awakening.
(6) Back (torso) Cracked ribs. Victim suffers a –5 penalty to attacks and skill checks that involve physical movement. This also slows down the victim, reducing his base movement rate by 25%.

Arrow, spear, poison gas, flooding room and blade traps already have a critical hit mechanic built in and are not subject to this variant rule.

New Magic Items:

Amulet of Dire Need

Aura strong necromancy; CL 11th;

DESCRIPTION

This amulet is a platinum disk with an onyx inset that protects the wearer from Critical Hits. When the wearer is damaged by a Critical Hit the amulet instantly casts heal upon the subject as many as two times per day.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Wondrous Item; Spells heal; Price 30,000 gp.

Corpsecloak

Aura strong necromancy; CL 11th;

DESCRIPTION

This gray, tattered fragment of moldy cloth is often thought to be no more than a scrap of refuse and is typically cast away or ignored altogether. It is, however, a potent and somewhat nefarious cloak that is sought out by those that have a dark fascination with death and things beyond the grave. For those that don this item, they soon unlock its secrets and are able to utilize its uniquely disgusting and stunningly powerful properties.

When the command word is spoken, the frayed remnant of fabric becomes a cloak-like mass of decaying flesh that seeps continually with a fetid mixture of organic material and near liquid flesh. When worn in this true form, the corpsecloak provides a +3 armor bonus to AC. Once per day, the wearer can fuse the corpsecloak with his flesh and take on the horrific appearance of an undead abomination. While combined with the rotting flesh of this vile garment, the wearer is immune to critical hits, subdual damage, and death from massive damage (See the Creatures immune to critical hits variant rule).

Further, the wearer can be detected as if he were an undead creature and may be subject to two potentially negative side effects. Upon fusing with the corpsecloak and once each hour thereafter, the wearer must succeed at a Will saving throw (DC 9 + 2 per each consecutive hour fused) or suffer an alignment shift to Chaotic Evil. When separating from the corpsecloak, the user must make a Fortitude saving throw (DC 17) or have the foul decomposition transfer to his flesh in the form of mummy rot.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Wondrous Item; Spells magic vestment, create undead; Price 18,000 gp; Weight 1 lb.

Vitalactery

Aura strong necromancy; CL 12th;

DESCRIPTION

A vitalactery is a variant of a lich’s phylactery, a magical device that can hold a life force. Where the lich’s entire soul is contained in a phylactery, only a tiny fraction of a living character’s life is held in a vitalactery. If the living character dies, the stored life surges out of the vitalactery and restores the character to life.

When found, a vitalactery may be open (75%) or closed (25%). A closed vitalactery currently contains a portion of life force belonging to someone. An open vitalactery is empty and can be used. To store life force in a vitalactery, the character holds the open device and places into it a single drop of blood (willing any number of hit points into the vitalactery). Hit points stored in this way are subtracted from the user’s hit point total and do not return until released (i.e. the devise is used). The character must also spend 300XP per hit point stored. Once the vitalactery is charged, it closes. If a closed vitalactery is destroyed, the stored hit points are lost.

If a character with life force stored in a vitalactery is reduced below –9 hit points, the character’s spirit does not depart, for the body is only mostly dead. Instead, it lingers for a number of hours equal to the number of hit points. At any point during this time period, the character’s spirit can choose to transfer all the hit points from the vitalactery to the character, most likely bringing the character back to life. If this transfusion of hit points is not enough to bring the character back to positive hit points, or if the spirit waits too long, the character is completely dead. Vitalacteries can only restore characters who died to injury, not from other forms of death such as disintegration.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Wondrous Item, raise dead; Price 22,300.

Firearms in a Fantasy World

Preface: Let me begin with a warning. Allowing firearms into your game world can be very risky. These weapons are very dangerous and can possibly unbalance your campaign. But that’s not even the real threat, black powder is. Players are notorious for abusing power and anything as powerful and versatile as ‘gun powder’ can and will be too much of a temptation. That is specifically why we wrote this section the way we did.

Considering the nature of this book, we thought that many of you would enjoy adding firearms to your game world. Especially for those who like the swashbuckling, sea voyages and piracy aspect of fantasy. We wanted to give you some options to put that flavor in your game, but without having to open up the entire scope of that level of technology and all of the inherent problems that go along with it.

In this section we present a handful of flintlock firearms and all the necessary accessories to use them. Yes, these weapons are extraordinarily powerful for non-magical weapons, as they should be. However, we have also included, both built into the mechanics and available as options, numerous limitations, dangers and drawbacks to using firearms, as well. Utilizing some or all of these options should allow you, as the Gamemaster, to provide your players with a new category of weapons to choose from while keeping the game balance intact.

Fantasy Firearms

Firearms are mechanical weapons that utilize an alchemical reaction to launch a projectile. Because these weapons are more technological than magical in nature, some GMs and players won’t consider firearms appropriate for their fantasy game setting. So, before introducing this group of weapons to your game, be sure to include everyone in on the decision to do so.

As deadly as slings, bows and crossbows are, they are still considered ‘standard velocity’ weapons. On the other hand, firearms are considered ‘high velocity’ weapons and as such have a much higher damage potential, as reflected in the high critical threat ranges and multipliers. When using the Critical Effects system, always treat critical hits from ‘high velocity’ weapons as one Factor Level higher than normal, effectively always resulting in either a Moderate or Serious wound severity.

For determining weapon proficiency, firearms are considered to be Martial weapons. In game worlds that include firearms, it is reasonable to assume that characters who extensively train with Martial weapons would have at least some exposure to this group of weapons.

Or do you think we should use the old stand-by of requiring the exotic weapon proficiency? Is lumping it in with Martial weapons too radical a shift?

Table 5-3: Firearms
Firearm Cost Dmg (S) Dmg (M) Crit Range Type Weight
Pistol 150 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x3 50 ft. P 3 lbs.
Shot (10) 1 gp 5 lbs.
Musket 300 gp 2d4 2d6 19-20/x4 120 ft. P 8 lbs.
Shot (10) 1 gp 5 lbs.
Musket, Rifled 600 gp 2d4 2d6 18-20/x4 160 ft. P 8 lbs.
Shot (10) 1 gp 5 lbs.
Blunderbuss 250 gp 2d6 2d8 19-20/x3 80 ft. P 10 lbs.
Shot, fine (10) 15 sp 5 lbs.

Pistol: This is a one-handed ranged weapon that you can wield as a light weapon. However, you still need two hands to properly load the weapon (see The Hazards of Firearms section). A pistol fires a single metal shot at high velocity. You can wield a pistol as a melee weapon, as an improvised club, but you risk damaging the firing mechanism or even the barrel. (At the DM’s discretion)

Musket: Longer, heavier and more powerful than the pistol, the musket is a two-handed ranged weapon. A musket fires a single metal shot at high velocity.

Musket, Rifled: A more precise version of the standard musket, the rifled musket is always a masterwork weapon which grants a +1 enhancement bonus to attack rolls. The rifled barrel of this weapon allows for greater range and accuracy.

Blunderbuss: Though not as long as the musket, the blunderbuss has a wider barrel allowing it to fire a handful of smaller shot (usually 5-6), rather than one larger one. This is a two-handed ranged weapon.

Alchemical Black Powder: This is a grainy compound that burns very quickly and is sold by the horn (a powder horn costs 40 gp). Each horn holds enough powder to load a typical firearm 10 times. Alchemical black powder is relatively expensive, takes a long time to make and is rare enough that it is hard to find in large quantities.

Ammunition: Most firearms use a single shot, a small lead ball. A blunderbuss uses fine shot, smaller than standard shot, but more of them. A pouch of fine shot contains enough for 10 uses.

The Hazards of Firearms

Firearms are great weapons with superior range and damage potential. But few weapons could reasonably be called ‘perfect’ and firearms are not one of them. There are many possible drawbacks to owning and using a firearm. Here are a few examples.

Loading time. Loading any firearm is a standard action. Pouring black powder, packing wad and shot all take time, concentration and two hands to properly perform. For this reason, firearms are usually only used once during a battle.

Don’t get it wet. Getting a loaded firearm wet will ruin the alchemical black powder in it, rendering it useless. If you are just splashed with liquid, you may attempt a Reflex save (DC 15) to prevent the weapon from getting wet. But if the weapon is submerged, it is automatically fouled, the powder ruined. (A powder horn is sufficiently sealed to protect the contents from moisture.) Before you can attempt to re-load and use that firearm again, you must to take the time to clean out the weapon, which takes an additional 1d4 rounds to complete. The shot is still good and can be re-loaded, but the powder within is ruined.

Backfire. Firearms are complicated weapons. Precise mechanics and alchemical reactions make these weapons dangerous to more than just the intended target. The possibility of backfire is very real. If a natural 1 is rolled during an attempt to fire the weapon, not only do you fail to hit your target but there is a 25% chance that the weapon will backfire. In such an event, you take 2d4 damage, you are blinded for 1d3 rounds and the weapon becomes useless, until properly repaired.

Not in my city! Even if firearms are a part of the game world, some places will not allow them. Many establishments, such as taverns and inns, may not allow patrons to bring in firearms, usually requiring them to check the weapons at the door. Some kingdoms and city-states may even have laws making the carrying or ownership of a firearm illegal. While others may allow them, but only with an official (and probably costly) permit or license. 

Sshhh! Not so loud! With the clanging of sword on shield, battle cries and such, the sound of a skirmish can be quite loud. But the thunderous boom of a firearm can carry for some distance beyond the usual, echoing off the mountain side or down the corridors of a dungeon. Because it is such a distinctive sound, anyone within earshot is sure to be alarmed and on the defensive, if not on the move to investigate!

Why not more things that go BOOM?!

With the introduction of alchemical black powder into your campaign, you may wonder why weapons like the cannon, bomb or grenade are not included in this section. True, any civilization that is technologically advanced enough to create flintlock weapons could surely make these weapons as well. It simply comes down to economics, the cost to efficiency ratio. Using the relatively large quantities of powder that the above mentioned weapons would require is far too expensive when compared to the damage potential of much cheaper weapons or even magic. This does not prevent such weapons from being developed, but they would not be mass produced and be rather rare.

Of Tooth and Nail – Monsters and Templates

Monsters are a strong part of any fantasy campaign. Some of these monsters have abilities that focus on a particular type of attack or a defense against it, such as immunity to piercing weapons or quills that may lodge themselves into a character’s skin leaving a painful reminder of the encounter.

Bonecracker

Bonecracker CR 5

XP 1600
CE Large humanoid (giant)
Init –1; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision; Perception +7

DEFENSE

AC 16, touch 8, flat-footed 16 (–1 Dex, +8 natural, –1 size)
hp 51 (6d8+24)
Fort +8, Ref +1, Will +3
DR 5/magic

OFFENSE

Speed 50 ft.
Melee 2 slams +10 (1d8+6/19–20 plus grab)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
Special Attacks tear apart

TACTICS

Bonecrackers revel in the destruction of other living creatures, particularly enjoying the sounds of exploding organs and snapping bones, and will often be wracked with almost child-like laughter while crushing the life out of a victim. When faced with numerous foes, the bonecracker will more often than not concentrate all of its murderous energies into completely destroying a single foe before moving on to another.

STATISTICS

Str 23, Dex 8, Con 17, Int 6, Wis 9, Cha 7
Base Atk +4; CMB +11 (+15 grapple); CMD 20
Feats Iron Will, Power Attack, Toughness, Vital StrikeB
Skills Climb +10, Perception +7
Languages Giant

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Tear Apart (Ex)

A bonecracker is particularly adept at pulling limbs off of its victims. The threat range on its slam attack is doubled, and if the bonecracker succeeds in making a critical hit upon an opponent, they tear off one of the limbs from their victim’s body with a successful opposed Strength check.

ECOLOGY

Environment any
Organization solitary, pair, or gang (3–4)
Treasure half standard

The bonecracker is a chaotic mutant beast, cousin to both the troll and the common ogre, the latter of which it resembles in many ways. The bonecracker’s body is covered in bony plates and thick, elephantine skin. The most obvious difference is the bonecracker’s massive arms and hands. Each arm is easily as long as the beast is tall and each hand is a large as a shield, easily capable of completely encircling a man’s torso.

The creature moves in much the same manner as a gorilla, planting both it’s massive fists on the ground at once and propelling itself forward at great speed. Moving in such a manner the bonecracker can travel at a tremendous speed and can easily outpace all but the fastest opponents.

Habitat/Society

Although they will occasionally gather in large numbers where prey is plentiful or when forced into the service by a powerful master, the bonecracker is generally a solitary creature. Bonecrackers are commonly found in temperate areas, especially in the foothills and forest areas. However, they may exist wherever a convenient niche and food source is located, especially in old hill giant lairs.

Campaign Use

The bonecracker fills much the same niche as the ogre and can be used virtually anyplace such creatures are encountered as an interesting alternative to the norm. A group of them could be used to lay siege to a small settlement or disrupt trade between neighboring towns.

Bonesaw

Bonesaw CR 1

XP 400
N Small animal
Init +3; Senses low-light vision, scent;Perception +5

DEFENSE

AC 15, touch 14, flat-footed 12 (+3 Dex, +1 natural, +1 size)
hp 5 (1d8+1)
Fort +3, Ref +5, Will +1

OFFENSE

Speed 30 ft.
Melee bite +4 (2d4–1 plus attach), 2 claws –1 (1d3–1)
Special Attacks bone rend

TACTICS

Bonesaws prefer to attack larger prey. They lie in wait for their quarry to pass, and then leap out, clamping their mouth onto one of their prey’s limbs. Propelling themselves up the limb with their powerful legs, their curved fangs slice the cumbersome flesh and strip it off like a banana peel, exposing the bones within which are then ground and pulverized with their sharp, tiny teeth.

STATISTICS

Str 8, Dex 16, Con 12, Int 2, Wis 12, Cha 10
Base Atk +0; CMB –2 (+6 grapple when attached); CMD 11 (15 vs. trip)
Feats Weapon Finesse
Skills Acrobatics +7 (+11 jumping), Perception +5, Stealth +11; Racial Modifiers +4 Acrobatics when jumping, +4 Perception, +4 Stealth

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Attach (Ex)

When a bonesaw hits with its bite attack, it latches onto the target with its outer ring of teeth and fangs while the inner rings go to work on its prey. An attached bonesaw is effectively grappling its prey. The bonesaw loses its Dexterity bonus to AC and has an AC of 12, but holds on with great tenacity. A bonesaw has a +8 racial bonus to maintain its grapple on a foe once it is attached. An attached bonesaw can be struck with a weapon or grappled itself—if its prey manages to win a grapple check or Escape Artist check against it, the bonesaw is removed.

Bone Rend (Ex)

An attacking bonesaw preferably tries to go for one of its prey’s extremities. If the bonesaw begins its round attached to its target, it automatically deals bite damage, but forgoes attacking with its claws, instead using them to help maintain its hold. Additionally, if the bonesaw’s prey ends its round with the bonesaw still attached, the prey must make a DC 11 Fortitude save or permanently lose functionality in the attached limb, as the bonesaw strips it of flesh and muscle and grinds away bone. The save DC is Constitution-based.

ECOLOGY

Environment temperate forests and plains
Organization solitary, pack (2–8), or horde (10–60)
Treasure none

A Bonesaw is a small predator commonly found roaming temperate forests and plains. They are bulky, muscular mammals but are surprisingly graceful. Almost 40% of their entire muscle mass is concentrated in their rear legs, making them powerful jumpers and strong runners, compensating for their comparatively small and underdeveloped forelimbs. During most of the year they have a dusky gray-brown, black-spotted coat, but this turns a clear bluish-white during the winter months.

The bonesaw’s most distinct feature is their mouth. Rather than a more commonplace mammalian jaw structure, the bonesaw has a mouth resembling nothing so much as the round, rasping maw of a lamprey. The most notable feature though is the trio of massive, inward-curving fangs ringing their huge mouth.

Though they have no treasure of their own, the jaws of a Bonesaw are much sought after as a decorative item and can easily fetch 50 gp. Their pelts are also moderately valuable, and an intact specimen can fetch about 15 gp, with a winter pelt going for up to double that amount.

Habitat and Society

Bonesaws normally hunt alone, but it is not uncommon for them congregate in packs of up to 8 members. Beyond that, they tend to start fighting among themselves, quickly reducing their numbers to a more manageable level. The exception to this is a bonesaw horde.

What it is exactly that drives the formation of a horde – starvation, overpopulation, madness, or some other, environmental impetus – is unknown, but every few years bonesaws congregate in a vast horde of up to several dozens of members, which ravages its way across the countryside, maiming and killing anything edible that they happen upon. The horde normally stays together for between 1 to 4 weeks, during which time they decimate livestock, obliterate natural animal populations and account for many dozens, if nor hundreds, of deaths among the civilized races.

Campaign Use

The simplest way to use the Bonesaw in a game is as a unique and dangerous addition to a random encounter list. More interesting however, would be the formation of a bonesaw horde. Dozens, perhaps as many as one hundred, of ravenous beasts are massacring their way towards a major settlement and the PCs are charged with dealing with this threat.

A knowledgeable sage has managed to determine a single location from which all of the bonesaw hordes have arisen. The PCs are tasked with making their way through to the heart of a bonesaw-infested forest to determine what causes the formation of the hordes and, if possible, to put and end to it once and for all.

For GMs, a bonesaw is also a good way to slow a party down by attacking mounts and pack animals. Likewise, a party which has bolstered its ranks through the hiring of numerous NPCs, can be whittled back down to manageable size by the judicious application of a few bonesaws.

Golem, Dung

Dung Golem CR 7

XP 3200
N Large construct
Init +0; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision; Perception +0

Aura stench (30 ft., DC 14, 10 rounds)

DEFENSE

AC 20, touch 8, flat-footed 20 (–1 Dex, +12 natural, –1 size)
hp 64 (8d10+20)
Fort +2, Ref +1, Will +2
DR 15/bludgeoning; Immune construct traits, magic

OFFENSE

Speed 15 ft.
Melee 2 slams +12 (2d8+5 plus disease)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
Special Attacks engulf

TACTICS

Dung golems attempt to ambush their prey by utilizing their camouflage, and then rapidly engulf them. They are slow and ponderous, but deadly nonetheless, especially since any damage inflicted upon it is liable to release deadly spores into the air.

STATISTICS

Str 20, Dex 9, Con –, Int –, Wis 11, Cha 1
Base Atk +8; CMB +14; CMD 23

SQ camouflage

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Camouflage (Ex)

Manure is a natural fertilizer, and so seeds and spores often take root in the golem’s body and rapidly develop into a mass of foliage or fungi that acts to completely cover it. When a dung golem is at rest, a DC 20 Perception check is required to notice it before it attacks for the first time. Anyone with ranks in Survival or Knowledge (nature) can use either of those skills instead of Perception to spot the golem (although its stench might arouse suspicions that something disgusting is nearby).

Disease (Ex)

Filth fever: Slam—injury; save Fort DC 14; onset 1d3 days; frequency 1/day; effect 1d3 Dex damage and 1d3 Con damage; cure 2 consecutive saves.

Engulf (Ex)

If a dung golem grapples a creature of Medium size of smaller and successfully pins it, the victim becomes engulfed in the dung golem’s mass. Engulfed creatures must make Fortitude saves each round against disease (see above), are in danger of suffocating, and are trapped within the golem’s body until they are no longer pinned. A dung golem does not count as grappling for having an engulfed creature inside of it, but only one creature can be engulfed at any one time.

Immunity to Magic (Ex)

A dung golem is immune to any spell or spell-like ability that allows spell resistance. In addition, certain spells and effects function differently against the creature, as noted below.

  • A diminish plants spell suppresses the dung golem’s camouflage ability for an entire year (no save).
  • A plant growth spell increases the DC of the Perception check required to penetrate the dung golem’s camouflage ability to 30.
  • A contagion spell cast directly at a clay golem temporarily increases the DC of its disease by 2 for one day.
  • Any magical attack against a dung golem that deals fire damage affects the dung golem normally and also slows the golem (as the slow spell) for 1d6 rounds (no save).
  • Any water-based magical attack against a dung golem also slows it (as the slow spell) for 2d6 rounds (no save).

ECOLOGY

Environment any temperate or warm, underground
Organization solitary, pair, or gang (3–4)
Treasure none

Dung golems are an ancient and rare form of construct, favored by both subterranean bat-folk and the natives of the resource poor volcanic islands of the western oceans. Others, notably the Drow, have since caught on to the creature’s utility.

The dung golem has a humanoid-shaped body, entirely composed of molded, slippery bat guano. They are tall and stoutly built with crudely fashioned limbs, while their faces are plain, with nothing but dark eyes and a gaping maw to mark a resemblance to their sentient masters. Because of the fertile nature of their bodies, most dung golems are covered at least partially in plant growth, a boon for stalking prey through jungles.

Construction

Dung golems are created by spellcasters with large quantities of bat guano at hand, some of which must be magically charged and come from summoned bats. The golem costs 50,000 gp to create, which includes 500 gp for the construction of the body. Assembling the body requires a Craft (sculpting) check (DC 13).

The creator must be 14th level and be able to cast arcane spells. Completing the ritual drains 1,000 XP from the creator and requires contagion, geas/quest, limited wish, polymorph any object, and summon swarm.

Gorgataur CR 6

XP 2400
LE Large monstrous humanoid
Init +4; Senses darkvision 60 ft., Perception +15

DEFENSE

AC 19, touch 9, flat-footed 19 (+10 natural, –1 size)
hp 69 (8d10+24)
Fort +7, Ref +6, Will +6

OFFENSE

Speed 30 ft.
Melee greataxe +12/+7 (3d6+7/×3) and gore +7 (1d8+5)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
Special Attacks breath weapon (15-foot cone, turn to stone, Fortitude DC 17 negates, usable every 1d4+1 rounds), powerful charge (gore +14, 2d8+7)

STATISTICS

Str 21, Dex 10, Con 17, Int 9, Wis 10, Cha 8
Base Atk +8; CMB +14; CMD 24
Feats Great Fortitude, Improved Bull Rush, Improved Initiative, Power Attack
Skills Intimidate +10, Perception +15, Survival +15; Racial Modifiers +4 Perception, +4 Survival
Languages Giant

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Breath Weapon

A gorgataur can use its breath weapon once every 1d4+1 rounds to create a 15-foot cone of green, gas. Those caught in the area of the gas can attempt a DC 17 Fortitude save to resist the effects, but those who fail the save are immediately petrified. This petrification is temporary—each round, a petrified creature can attempt a new DC 17 Fortitude save to recover from the petrification. The save DC is Constitution-based.

ECOLOGY

Environment temperate plains, temperate hills, underground
Organization solitary, pair, or squad (3–4)
Treasure standard (greataxe, other treasure)

An obvious cousin of the minotaur, this powerful creature intimidates all nearby with it’s sharp, coal colored horns, menacing stare and ebony plated hide.

Few creatures demand your attention on the battlefield quite like the gorgataur. These massive brutes charge fearlessly into thick of combat, blade and horn cutting a bloody swath through the ranks. Though not exceptionally intelligent, they are cunning combatants and often spearhead troop advancements.

At first glance, the dark, naturally plated hide of a gorgataur is often mistaken for armor. Their horns are large, almost as wide as their shoulders and extending forward just beyond their snout. When these creatures get riled up, in anticipation of battle, their exhalation becomes a light green mist, regardless of the air temperature.

The first gorgataurs were created through dark magic and have since been bred specifically as elite guards or soldiers. Most serve powerful masters in this capacity, liking the steady work and the stability of a permanent home/lair. Others join up with mercenary groups or create their own squads. A gorgataur taking over the leadership role of a gang of minotaurs is not unheard of. Rarely is a gorgataur found wandering the wilderness alone.

Gorgataur champions are partial to taking the Improved Sunder feat, to better dispatch their petrified enemies before they can recover.

Grimble CR 10

XP 9600
NE Huge ooze
Init –1; Senses blindsight 60 ft.; Perception –5

DEFENSE

AC 18, touch 6, flat-footed 18 (–2 Dex, +12 natural, –2 size)
hp 172 (15d8+105)
Fort +12, Ref +3, Will +0
Immune ooze traits

OFFENSE

Speed 15 ft.
Melee slam +17 (3d6+12 plus rend armor)
Space 15 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
Special Attacks death throes, impregnate, wounding

TACTICS

When in combat, a full sized Grimble will raise itself into a 15 ft. tall pillar of whirling green flesh, poisonous pseudopods, and deadly thorns. This tornadic movement often places great fear into its opponents and easily allows the creature to rend flesh and armor on contact with its body.

STATISTICS

Str 27, Dex 7, Con 25, Int –, Wis 1, Cha 5
Base Atk +11; CMB +21; CMD 29 (can’t be tripped)
Feats Whirlwind AttackB

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Death Throes (Ex)

If brought below 0 hit points, the grimble looses internal cohesion, screeches loudly and then explodes, raining sharp horns and mucus against everything and everyone within 30 ft. Those failing a DC 15 Reflex save take 5d6 points of piercing damage (save for half) and suffer a 25% chance of becoming impregnated with a grimble seedling shard (see below).

Impregnate (Ex)

Whenever a grimble hits a target without an armor, shield or natural armor bonus, there is a 25% chance that it leaves behind a tiny sliver of bone implanted under the skin of its victim. This shard acts as a seedling for a new grimble. Grimble shards hatch in 24 hours, at which point the young grimble consume the host from within, inflicting 1 point of Con damage per hour per young until the host dies. A remove disease spell (or similar effect) rids a victim of all implanted shards or active young, or they can be cut out one at a time with DC 20 Heal checks (each attempt takes 10 minutes). If a check fails, the healer can try again, but each attempt (successful or not) deals 1d4 points of damage to the patient.

Rend Armor (Ex)

If a grimble hits a foe, there is a chance that their armor will be punctured and rent. Any time that a grimble hits with its slam attack, it can make a CMB check as a free action. If the grimble is successful, the target’s armor and shield lose half their hit points and gain the broken condition if the target fails a DC 26 Reflex save. Creatures with natural armor are affected somewhat differently. Each time the target fails its Reflex save, their natural armor bonus decreases by 2, to a minimum of +0. This damage heals back naturally at a rate of +1 per day of complete rest. The save DC is Strength-based.

Wounding (Ex)

Any living creature damaged by a grimble continues to bleed, losing 1 hit point per round thereafter due to an anti-clotting agent secreted by the creature. Multiple wounds do not result in cumulative bleeding loss. The bleeding can be stopped by a DC 15 Heal check or the application of a cure spell or some other healing magic.

ECOLOGY

Environment any
Organization solitary
Treasure none

The grimble, also known as the thorn or horn ooze, is a disgusting mass of green jelly-like flesh covered by wickedly sharp born thorns and teeth that is known for its ability to reduce the armor of a target stuck to its glue like-flesh to bits of bloody metal in seconds. The creature’s uncanny ability to slip between a target’s armored plates of both flesh and metal causes it to be the fear of many a veteran fighter or aged dragon. Any who rely on armor to save them from death have something to fear in the grimble.

The grimble is the secret weapon of a war long ended. After the battles stopped, the grimble had no other use other than a sideshow attraction, so it became ‘wild’ as it threw off its magical leash and turned on its creators. If they did not make battle, then the creature would on its own, for it hungered for the feel of metal and flesh and the screams of the dying. It had been engineered and crafted for such, and it was part of the creature’s instinct to heap suffering on one creature after another until something came along that could slay it outright. The Grimble has yet to find such an opponent and the original creature has split many times to form more of its kind in its mission for mindless battle and consumption. The deadly instructions placed into the parent creature have unfortunately spread to its offspring, so they too kill without meaning.

Reproduction isn’t a concern for the grimble, but it does so often. Whenever it battles a creature who escapes it, it will often leave a horn or tooth lodged in their body, most of the time into the bone of their target. This thorn is actually a seedling, much like those given off by plants, which needs the warm flesh of a host body and the sweet blood contained within as sustenance. The offspring slowly kills the host as it gets larger by draining them dry of bodily fluids, but only leaves once the host is completely dead at which point it turns and rages through the desiccated flesh of its first victim in search of more (which is often the loved ones of the now dead host).

Quill Rat CR 1/2

XP 200
N Small animal
Init +2; Senses low-light vision; Perception +1

DEFENSE

AC 15, touch 13, flat-footed 13 (+2 Dex, +2 natural, +1 size)
hp 5 (1d8+1)
Fort +3, Ref +4, Will +1
Immune acid

OFFENSE

Speed 40 ft., climb 20 ft.
Melee bite +3 (1d4–1 plus 1 acid)
Special Attacks acidic quills, reflexive burst

STATISTICS

Str 8, Dex 15, Con 13, Int 2, Wis 13, Cha 4
Base Atk +0; CMB –2; CMD 10 (14 vs. trip)
Feats Weapon Finesse
Skills Climb +11, Acrobatics +2 (+6 jumping), Perception +1, Stealth +6

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Acidic Quills (Ex)

The quill rat’s back is covered in barbed, acid-filled spines. Anyone grappling a quill rat or striking it with an unarmed or natural attack takes 1d3 points of piercing damage and 1d3 acid damage from the quills.

Reflexive Burst (Ex)

If a quill rat suffers a critical hit or if an attack drops it below 0 hp, it reflexively launches 1d4 quills in the direction of its attacker. Treat each quill as a ranged attack at +3 with a 10 ft. range increment, which deals 1 point of piercing damage and 1 point of acid damage on a hit.

ECOLOGY

Environment any temperate
Organization solitary, pack (2–20), or colony (30–60)
Treasure none

A quill rat is a 3-foot long rodent covered in coarse, quill-like hairs that make it resemble a porcupine. It is generally black, gray or brown in coloration. Voracious feeders, a horde of quill rats can descend upon a field or town and strip it bare of edibles–grain, vegetables, fruit, poultry, even sheep and goats are all consumed. They thus constitute a deadly menace to any civilized society. These little nomadic horrors will move on once the supply of food is exhausted, leaving a swath of devastation in their wake.

The only redeeming quality of these creatures is the acid secreted from their quills. When coated on a slashing or piercing weapon, the weapon deals an extra +1 acid damage for 1 minute. Three quills provide enough acid to coat a single, Medium-sized weapon, and the market value for such a dose is 50 gp. A freshly killed quill rat provides 3d4 harvestable quills.

TACTICS

A quill rat normally flees from combat against foes larger than itself. If cornered, it fights defensively, hissing at those who threaten it and raising its hackles. It’s needle-like hairs secret acid, which prevents prudent foes from closing.

Lizardfolk, Ramzadi CR 2

XP 600
CN Large humanoid (reptilian)
Init +1; Senses scent; Perception +3

DEFENSE

AC 17, touch 10, flat-footed 16 (+1 Dex, +5 natural, +2 shield, –1 size)
hp 22 (3d8+9)
Fort +5, Ref +2, Will +0

OFFENSE

Speed 30 ft., climb 15 ft.
Melee morningstar +3 (2d6+2), bite +1 (1d6+1), tail slap +1 (1d4+1)
Ranged javelin +2 (1d8+2)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 5 ft.
Special Attacks crush (1d4+1)

STATISTICS

Str 15, Dex 13, Con 15, Int 7, Wis 9, Cha 10
Base Atk +2; CMB +5; CMD 16
Feats Multiattack, Toughness
Skills Climb +14, Perception +3, Survival +3 (+7 scent tracking)
Languages Draconic

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Crush (Ex)

A favorite combat technique of the ramzadi is to wrap their tail around their victims while grappling and squeeze their prey like a constrictor snake. Each round that a ramzadi lizardfolk pins their foe in a grapple, they deal an additional 1d4+1 damage.

ECOLOGY

Environment any forest
Organization solitary, family (3–6), hunting party (7–10), or tribe (11–30)
Treasure NPC gear (heavy wooden shield, morningstar, 3 javelins, other treasure)

The Ramzadi are a race of lizardfolk that average 8-9 ft. in height, although 10 ft. tall males are not unheard of in some regions. Their massive frames weigh between 600-700 lbs. with the largest males going as much as 800 lbs. Skin coloration of the species ranges from a light gray to a deep green-brown, depending upon the season and terrain. Ramzadi males have a crest on the back of their neck that tends to become hot and glows faintly when they are enraged. They use their long whip-like tail for both balance and combat purposes. The tail is usually 4-5 ft. in length and may regenerate over time if severed.

TACTICS

Ramzadi love battle and combat. To die amidst the rage of battle is the greatest honor that can be bestowed upon by any ramzadi. The only thing better than trashing the “lesser” draconic races is fighting large monsters. Their entire history is based upon the principle of finding someone or something who is brave (or foolish) enough to battle against them. The ramzadi combat credo can be boiled down to a single concept, “Run up to it and kill it!” The ramzadi prefer to use metal weapons if they can find them, but most settlements have difficulty producing a working smith. They are adept at using their tails to grapple and strangle their enemies, and enjoy squeezing the life of an opponent face-to-face.

Habitat and Society

Ramzadi society is arboreal. They live in huge tree houses that occupy the ancient and great trees in the deep forests. Being a clan-like society, the houses are grouped together with all houses in that group belonging to a single clan. The prestige of the clan or family is represented by the height of the houses above the ground, meaning the higher the house, the greater the social status. Ramzadi use a series of interconnected rope bridges that they climb upon to travel between houses.

Government structure is also clan-like. Each clan consists of several families who maintain and guard the territory borders from intruders. Clan wars are not uncommon when one clan or family seeks to improve its standing in the social pecking order. Each clan is ruled by a Tomud, or chieftain. The Tomud is the most powerful ramzadi, the physically strongest and toughest. Any ramzadi may challenge the Tomud in nonlethal battle. If the challenger is victorious, he is now Tomud and his family may occupy the clan’s uppermost house. Only the greatest and best may rule, but the ramzadi long ago realized the wisdom of not killing each other to secure the survival of their race.

Courageous ramzadi are held in high esteem and honor. Each month, the Tomuds from all area clans gather for the Sanu, a three-day celebration where each great deed is told. The most triumphant ramzadis are given gifts to adorn themselves. These trophies are then worn as a sign of respect and stature. Ramzadi love treasure and covet gold, silver and other shiny metals. One should never stand between a ramzadi and his treasure.

Tree climbing is a favorite pastime of youthful ramzadi. They often bet on who can climb the highest in a tree without falling. Watching a ramzadi climb is a fascinating sight. They climb and move like great tree lizards or geckos as they use their claws to literally move straight up the tree or out onto branches. Ramzadi enjoy wrestling and will wrestle anyone or anything willing to brawl.

Race Relations

Ramzadi tend to be a good but chaotic race and do not get along with other draconic species. They enjoy waging war on lizardfolk, kobolds and other draconic races. They feel a distant kinship to dragons but do not hesitate to attack any evil dragon that tries to settle near any Ramzadi territory.

Ramzadi have strong trade relations with the elven communities and other sylvan residents. They have a deep love for elven war ballads and battle music, which “sets the proper mood” just before they go into combat. Ramzadi have a deep respect for dwarven artistry and craftsmanship, but have little contact with the deep dwelling race and have difficulty comprehending why anyone would want to live underground.

They get along with humans but don’t understand how such a frail species survives extinction. Ramzadi have very little to do with halflings or gnomes as neither race contribute anything of value that warrants maintaining trade relations. Half-orcs are not loved, but are respected since they are one of the few races that can hold their own against a ramzadi. Some half-orcs even make their homes among the ramzadi, although they may never challenge for Tomud.

Scantling CR 1

XP 400
NG Small monstrous humanoid
Init +2; Senses darkvision 60 ft.; Perception +6

DEFENSE

AC 15, touch 13, flat-footed 13 (+2 Dex, +2 natural, +1 size)
hp 13 (2d10+2)
Fort +1, Ref +5, Will +4

OFFENSE

Speed 20 ft.
Melee 2 claws +5 (1d3–1/×3)
Special Attacks quill rend (1d6–1)

STATISTICS

Str 8, Dex 15, Con 13, Int 10, Wis 13, Cha 10
Base Atk +2; CMB +0; CMD 12
Feats Weapon Finesse
Skills Climb +4, Perception +6, Stealth +7, Survival +6
Languages Common, Sylvan

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Quill Rend (Ex)

The scantling’s body bristles with long quills. When a scantling hits with both claws, the creature thrashes about violently, dealing an additional 1d6–1 piercing damage to its foe. In addition, each time a target suffers a quill rend, they must make a DC 13 Reflex save or suffer a cumulative –1 penalty on attack rolls, saving throws and skill checks, as a number of quills lodge themselves painfully under the skin. These quills can be removed with a minute of work and a DC 15 Heal check. The save DC is Reflex-based.

ECOLOGY

Environment any warm
Organization solitary, pair, troup (3–8), or tribe (11–30)
Treasure standard

Scantlings seem to be, at first glance, diminutive, inky blobs of living quills. Completely pitch black from the tips of their long, fearsome quills to the soles and palms of their small, paw-like feet and hands, scantlings look more like a patch of night erratically ripped from the dark midnight sky than an actual, living creature. Scantlings derive their unusual coloration from the thick, black, layer of quills, which cover the small creatures completely. Most of the quills remain stunted and prickly over the majority of their bodies, much like a hedgehog. Around the creatures’ head and back, the quills tend to grow frantically outward and upward in the manner of a porcupine. So robust are these longer quills that they add considerable girth and height to a scantling, making one appear up to twice its actual size. Razor sharp, retractable claws tip the short, but dexterous hands and feet of the scantlings; these creatures’ can use any of their four paws equally well, and can manipulate tools and implements with their feet or hands with ease.

The one aspect of their appearance that is exceedingly odd is their penchant for bearing striking, magical masks over their features whenever they are in the presence of non-scantlings. Whether or not they wear these masks when in private is unknown, however. These masks, which always appear in the sharply contrasting colors of white and black, often take on the semblance of the race with which the scantling is communicating. When dealing with a gnome, the mask of a scantling will take on the features commonly associated with gnomes – bulbous noses, overly large ears, smiling mouths and so on. But would shift to mirror the features of an elf (almond-shaped eyes, pointed ears, etc.) when speaking with one of the sylvan race. While the masks do not move in any fashion, the voice of the scantling is never muffled, or at least not noticeably so, seeing as how no one has ever heard the true voice of one of these unusual and enigmatic creatures. Strangely, these unusual masks are never found upon the bodies of slain scantlings, which revert to large balls of impenetrable, prickly quills upon their death. Scantlings speak Common haltingly but are fluent in Sylvan.

TACTICS

Despite the suppositions of many, scantlings are frighteningly fearsome opponents when riled. They seem to approach each combative encounter as a puzzling engineering problem to be solved and quickly access their strengths and their weaknesses, formulate a plan and throw themselves into that plan’s execution with their typical gusto.

Habitat/Society

Scantlings seem the most at home wherever the temperature and humidity are at their height and remain there for the majority of the time. Dense and humid forests, jungles, marshes and even underground areas provide them plentiful cover and room to weave their bizarre nest like structures in which they reside. Carefully crafted from cast-off quills, these quillhusks, are cunningly built into chaotically complex patterns. Local environs are used to provide camouflage and there is ample room for the scantlings to rear their young, grow their fungal food sources, and conduct the daily activities required to keep the village running smoothly.

Other than their families, scantlings, as a rule share an unusual passion: the art of the yakku, or submerged spear and blowgun target practice. Scantlings are fine marksmen when on dry ground, and their handmade spears, bows, arrows, blowguns, and blowgun darts are of supreme craftsmanship, but it is their ability to guide missiles to their intended targets beneath the water that is truly impressive. They hold annual festivals, which revolve around these skills and the yakku; all members of the scantling society – male and female alike – are trained with all manner of simple melee weapons from birth.

Scantlings are fungivores, dining exclusively on a specific type of prolific fungi that is native to their muggy homes. They cultivate these fungi in the quillhusks, raising it as a farmer would corn and are skilled and inventive in its preparation. It is interesting to note that different tribes of scantlings that inhabit a single area will always select different types of fungi upon which to dine; many sages believe that this is a way of insuring the survival of their race as a whole by reducing competition, but none know for certain.

Scantlings mate for life and the competition to gain a mate is a vibrant and intense spectacle. Taking place annually after the yakku festivals, male scantlings will decorate their night-black forms by wallowing in mud mixed with brightly colored pigments. Over this they then fling lightly hued sand, brilliantly tinted feathers, shells, and stones, which dries to the underlying mud in spectacular patterns. Male scantlings take great care and time in preparing their “mating mud” and once it has been adjusted to perfection, they parade before the assembled village females in a strange sort of wiggling dance. Females then select which males are deemed the most appealing, and they bond for life, typically producing one to two young every three to five years. The parents carefully and lovingly rear the young with occasional aid by other members of the tribe.

Campaign Use

Scantlings are versatile creatures that can equally serve in the roles of allies or enemies to characters that enter into the lands near their humble homes. As allies, scantlings prove to be excellent guides, sources of local information and lore, as well as welcomed sources of sanctuary and healing in the regions where they are encountered. As enemies, scantlings can be portrayed as an insular, superstitious tribal people who staunchly defend their borders from unwelcome interlopers or as surprisingly deadly shock troops for a much larger and controlling threat. Combining these two aspects can afford numerous opportunities for new story hooks and plot twists. A group of good, but misguided scantlings that have been mercilessly plagued with an invasion of deadly creatures may go on the warpath, capturing or slaying everyone and everything that enters into their domain.

Variant Subspecies

In especially remote areas, a seemingly unique subspecies of scantling has been known to exist – the carnivorous scantling. These fierce, feral creatures roam the land in quickly moving packs that are always on the hunt. They consume anything that is, or once was, living and the stark masks which cover their never-seen visages constantly swirl with shifting visions of leering, demon-like skulls. For this reason, these offshoots of their more tranquil cousins are often called deaths-heads by locals fortunate enough to avoid their slicing claws and piercing quills.

Scantling Mask

These stark white masks are rarely, if ever, seen outside of the possession of a scantling. In fact, it is an offense punishable by death for a scantling to produce, or teach another the secrets of producing, a scantling mask for one not of their race. Somehow these secrets have been discovered by outsiders, however, and rarely a non-scantling is encountered wearing one of these mighty masks; any non-scantling wearing one of these stark, shifting masks will be attacked by scantlings on sight.

These masks confer two primary, but powerful abilities. First, the wearer can, as a free action, alter the features of the mask to mimic the commonly accepted features of any race with which they are dealing. For example, if the wearer of a scantling mask has dealings with a dwarf, then he may alter the mask to display the usual blocky, bearded and dour features usually associated with dwarves. From that moment onward, the wearer receives a +4 enhancement bonus to all Charisma based rolls when dealing with that individual, provided they fail a Will saving throw (DC 13). Please note that this bonus does not confer to all members of the mimicked race, but merely a single individual at a time, multiple individuals are each allowed their own save.

Secondly, the scantling mask gives the wearer the potent ability to transfer critical hits in combat to a member of the race they are currently mimicking. For example, if the wearer of the scantling masks encounters two dwarf rogues and an elven ranger in a dark alley and elects to mimic a dwarf. After a few moments, the interaction turns sour and combat ensues; the wearer of the scantling mask could transfer any critical hits to one of the dwarves. The individual targeted to receive the brunt of the critical hit is allowed a Will saving throw (DC 15) to resist and if successful, the wearer of the scantling mask would suffer the hit normally. If the saving throw is failed, that individual then bears the full damage of the critical hit.

Producing these masks is an innate ability for scantlings, which is continually in effect, much like breathing. Upon the death of a scantling, the mask vanishes, apparently absorbed back into the creature’s form.

CL: 12th; Feats: Craft Wondrous Item; Spells displacement, phantasmal killer, bestow curse, contingency, creator must be a scantling; Price: 12,000 gp; Weight: 1 lb.

Scantling quill projectile

A projectile crafted from the quill of a scantling functions in the same manner as an ordinary projectile of the same type with a few bonuses. The critical multiplier of the weapon is increased by one and a successful critical hit results in the quill breaking off in the wound. A lodged quill imposes a –1 circumstance penalty to attacks, saves, and skill checks until it is removed with a DC 15 Heal check. Only masterwork projectiles that inflict piercing damage can be crafted using a scantling quill. The projectile is extremely fragile and is destroyed beyond repair once it is used (misfires and misses included).

Talyn CR 2

XP 600
N Medium humanoid (reptilian)
Init +2; Senses low-light vision; Perception +4

DEFENSE

AC 17, touch 12, flat-footed 15 (+2 Dex, +5 natural)
hp 16 (3d8+3)
Fort +2, Ref +5, Will +1

OFFENSE

Speed 40 ft.
Melee spear +4 (1d8+3/×3) and talon –1 (1d6+1)
Ranged spear +4 (1d8+2/×3)
Special Attacks knock-down pounce

STATISTICS

Str 14, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 5, Wis 10, Cha 9
Base Atk +2; CMB +4; CMD 16
Feats Nimble Moves, Skill Focus (Perception)
Skills Acrobatics +8 (+12 jump), Perception +4; Racial Modifiers +4 Acrobatics
Languages Draconic

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Knockdown Pounce (Ex)

When a talyn charges, it leaps into the air and slams into its target, attempting to knock its prey to the ground. At the end of its charge, a talon can make a full attacks with its spear and two talons. Additionally, if both talons hit, it can try to trip its target as a free action without provoking an attack of opportunity. If the trip attempt fails, it is not tripped in return.

ECOLOGY

Environment warm forests
Organization solitary, pair, hunting party (4–8)
Treasure standard (spear, other treasure)

A primitive race of sleek reptilian humanoids with a pre-historic semblance.>

These medium-sized humanoids are a hybrid mix of the common lizardfolk and the deinonychus.  There is a great deal of controversy among scholars and sages as to whether they were created by natural inter-species breeding or by some mad magical experiment. These vicious creatures are barely intellectually advanced enough to utilize crude weapons and tools.

Like their prehistoric cousins, the talyn hunt in packs of 4 to 8 adults. Hunting groups will usually have roughly half their number make their way straight toward their target, while the rest stealthily moving along their periphery in hopes of flanking their prey and catching them by surprise. Individually, if not within close enough range, a talyn hunter will usually throw a javelin, followed up quickly by their Charging Pounce attack.

Talyn gather into large, nomadic tribes of up to about 30 (including young). Each tribe is lead by either an alpha male or female. Talyn hate their Lizardfolk cousins and will usually attack them on sight. However, sometimes Talyn and Lizardfolk have been known to work together, but only when lead by a powerful master, such as a dragon, and it is never an easy truce.

Templates

The use of templates provides a whole new appearance and often attitude to creatures. Players can be thrown off-kilter and have a hard time dealing with even the most common of monsters when a template is applied. They don’t know what to think or how to react when they are faced with a spined owlbear that is covered in quills. Here are three new templates to use against an overly confident group of players.

Primal Template

Primal creatures are genetic throwbacks of their modern counterparts. Primal creatures typically live in their own communities, or work as mercenaries or even slaves to their more advanced brethren.

Creating a Primal Creature

Primal” is a template that can be added to any fey, humanoid, and monstrous humanoid creature (referred to hereafter as the “base creature”). The base creature’s type changes to “monstrous humanoid.” The primal creature uses the base creature’s statistics and special abilities except as noted here.

Size: Increase the base creature’s size by one size category, to a maximum of Huge.

AC: Increase natural armor by +2.

Hit Dice Increase the base creature’s hit dice by 2.

Damage: Primal creatures gain a bite and a pair of claw attacks. Use damage values appropriate to their size, or those of the base creature, whichever is better.

Size Bite Damage Claw Damage
Diminutive 1d2 1
Tiny 1d3 1d2
Small 1d4 1d3
Medium-size 1d6 1d4
Large 1d8 1d6
Huge 2d6 1d8

Special Attacks: A primal creature gains the following:

Improved Critical (Ex)

The primal creature gains Improved Critical as a bonus feat for their bite and claw attacks.

Frightening Roar (Su)

Once per day the primal creature may make a frightening roar as a standard action. This sound-based mind-affecting fear effect only works against creatures within 30 feet with fewer hit dice than the primal creature. Those affected must make a Will save (DC 10 + half the primal creature’s hit dice + the primal creature’s Charisma modifier) or become panicked for 2d6 rounds. Creatures that succeed on the saving throw are immune to the same primal creature’s frightening roar for 24 hours.

Special Qualities

Scent (Ex)

A primal creature gains the scent ability.

Damage Reduction (Ex)

A primal creature gains damage reduction based on its hit dice, which stacks with any similar damage reduction the creature might possess, such as from levels in the barbarian class.

Hit Dice Damage Reduction
1-3
4-7 2/-
8-11 4/-
12+ 6/-

Abilities: Change from base creature as follows: Str +4, Con +4, Int –2, Cha –2. In all cases, scores cannot be reduced below a score of 3.

Challenge Rating: Same as the base creature +2.

Alignment: Change to chaotic (any).

Sample Primal Creature

Here is an examples of primal creatures, using a gnoll as the base creature.

Gnoll, Primal CR 3

XP 800
CE Large humanoid (gnoll)
Init +0; Senses darkvision 60 ft., scent;Perception +2

DEFENSE

AC 14, touch 9, flat-footed 14 (+2 armor, +3 natural, –1 size)
hp 30 (4d8+12)
Fort +7, Ref +1, Will +1
DR 2/–

OFFENSE

Speed 30 ft.
Melee 2 claws +6 (1d6+4/19–20) and bite +4 (1d8+2/19–20)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 5 ft.
Special Attacks frightening roar (DC 10)

STATISTICS

Str 19, Dex 10, Con 17, Int 6, Wis 11, Cha 6
Base Atk +3; CMB +8; CMD 18
Feats Improved Critical (bite)B, Improved Critical (claw)B, Multiattack, Power Attack
Skills Climb +8, Perception +2, Survival +4 (+8 scent tracking)
Languages Gnoll

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Frightening Roar (Su)

Once per day a primal gnoll may make a frightening roar as a standard action. This sound-based mind-affecting fear effect only works against creatures within 30 feet with fewer hit dice than the primal gnoll. Those affected must make a DC 10 Will save or become panicked for 2d6 rounds. Creatures that succeed on the saving throw are immune to the same primal gnoll’s frightening roar for 24 hours.

ECOLOGY

Environment warm plains or desert
Organization as gnoll
Treasure NPC Gear (leather armor, other treasure)

Spined

In lands rich with magic and fantastic beasts, anomalies occasionally occur. Spined creatures are identical to normal members of their race, but they are covered in sharp bony spines that protrude from the skeleton. As spined creatures are better equipped for survival and breed true, once they appear in a species, they generally thrive.

Creating A Spined Creature

Spined” is a template that can be added to any corporeal creature that has a skeletal structure (referred to hereafter as the “base creature”). The creature’s type remains unchanged, and it uses all of the base creature’s statistics and special abilities except as noted here.

AC: Natural armor improves by +1.

Attacks: A spined creatures gains a slam attack using their spined bodies or limbs that is equivalent to a shield bash with a heavy spiked shield of the appropriate size for the creature.

Damage: Piercing damage appropriate to the creature’s size as listed below. If the creature already has a slam attack, use the greater damage die.

Size Slam Damage
Fine
Diminutive 1
Tiny 1d2
Small 1d3
Medium-size 1d4
Large 1d6
Huge 1d8
Gargantuan 2d6
Colossal 2d8

Special Attacks: Spined creatures retain all the special attacks of their base creature as well as those noted below.

Quills (Ex)

Mixed in with the creatures spines are detachable quills which can be launched as a ranged attack with a range increment of 30 feet, and which do damage as a slam of a creature sized one size smaller. The spined creature gains an additional quill attack per round for every 4 points of its base attack bonus. While launching a single quill can be done as a standard action, firing multiple quills per round requires a full-round action.

Spikes (Ex)

Anyone grappling a spined creature or striking it with an unarmed or natural attack takes piercing damage equal to the base slam damage for the creature (not including its Strength modifier to damage, if any).

Wounding (Ex)

A spined creature’s slam attack is treated as if it had the wounding weapon property.

Challenge Rating: Same as base creature +1.

Sample Spined Creature

This example uses a girallon as the base creature.

Girallon, Spined

Spined Girallon CR 7

XP 3200
N Large magical beast
Init +7; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, scent; Perception +11

DEFENSE

AC 19, touch 12, flat-footed 16 (+3 Dex, +7 natural, –1 size)
hp 73 (7d10+35)
Fort +9, Ref +8, Will +5

OFFENSE

Speed 40 ft., climb 40 ft.
Melee bite +10 (1d6+4), 4 claws +10 (1d4+4 plus rend), and slam +10 (1d6+4 plus wounding)
Ranged 2 quills +9 (1d4+4)
Space 10 ft.; Reach 5 ft.
Special Attacks rend (4 claws, 1d4+6), spikes (1d6)

STATISTICS

Str 19, Dex 17, Con 18, Int 2, Wis 12, Cha 7
Base Atk +7; CMB +14; CMD 27
Feats Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Skill Focus (Perception), Toughness
Skills Climb +14, Perception +11, Stealth +5

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Quills (Ex)

A spined girallon can launch a single quill as a standard action, or two as a full-round action, with a range increment of 30 feet.

Spikes (Ex)

Anyone grappling a spined girallon or striking it with an unarmed or natural attack takes 1d6 piercing damage.

Wounding (Ex)

A spined girallon’s slam attack is treated as if it had the wounding weapon property. In addition to its normal damage, a slam deals 1 point of bleed damage when it hits a creature. Multiple hits increase the bleed damage. Bleeding creatures take the bleed damage at the start of their turns. Bleeding can be stopped by a DC 15 Heal check or through the application of any spell that cures hit point damage. A critical hit does not multiply the bleed damage. Creatures immune to critical hits are immune to the bleed damage dealt by this attack.

ECOLOGY

Environment warm forests
Organization solitary or company (5–8)
Treasure none

Vicious

For some, surviving by tooth and claw comes more easily than others. Vicious creatures are somewhat larger, more aggressive-looking than other members of their race, with teeth, claws and other natural attack forms more pronounced. Whether their claws are longer, teeth sharper, or spikes barbed, threatening creatures are the epitome of natural combat.

Creating A Vicious Creature

“Vicious” is a template that can be added to any non-humanoid creature that has a natural attack form that does not inflict subdual damage (referred to hereafter as the “base creature”); the attack form can be from slam, bite, claw, or gore, just not unarmed strike. The creature’s type remains unchanged, and it uses all of the base creature’s statistics and special abilities except as noted here.

Special Attacks: Vicious creatures retain all the special attacks of their base creature as well as those noted below.

Enhanced Critical (Ex)

Choose one natural attack form. That form’s critical hit multiplier increases by one (increasing from ×2 to ×3, for example).

Bonus Feats The creature gains Improved Critical as a bonus feat for each natural attack form they possess.

Challenge Rating: Same as base creature +1.

Sample Vicious Creature

This example uses a bulette as the base creature.

Bulette, Vicious

Vicious Bulette CR 8

XP 4800
N Huge magical beast
Init +6; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, scent, tremorsense 60 ft.;Perception +11

DEFENSE

AC 22, touch 10, flat-footed 20 (+2 Dex, +12 natural, –2 size)
hp 84 (8d10+40)
Fort +11, Ref +8, Will +5

OFFENSE

Speed 40 ft., burrow 20 ft.
Melee bite +13 (2d8+9/17–20×3) and 2 claws +12 (2d6+6/19–20)
Space 15 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
Special Attacks leap, savage bite

STATISTICS

Str 23, Dex 15, Con 20, Int 2, Wis 13, Cha 6
Base Atk +8; CMB +16; CMD 28 (32 vs. trip)
Feats Improved Critical (bite)B, Improved Critical (claw)B, Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Skill Focus (Perception), Weapon Focus (bite)
Skills Acrobatics +9 (+17 jumping), Perception +11; Racial Modifiers +4 on Acrobatics checks made to jump

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Enhanced Critical (Ex)

The critical multiplier on the bulette’s bite attack increases one step to ×3.

Leap (Ex)

A bulette can perform a special kind of pounce attack by jumping into combat. When a bulette charges, it can make a DC 20 Acrobatics check to jump into the air and land next to its enemies. If it makes the Acrobatics check, it can follow up with four claw attacks against foes in reach, but cannot make a bite attack.

Savage Bite (Ex)

A bulette’s bite is particularly dangerous. It applies 1-1/2 times its Strength modifier to damage inflicted with its bite attack, and threatens a critical hit on a 19–20.

ECOLOGY

Environment temperate hills
Organization solitary or pair
Treasure none

Appendix I: Torn Asunder Quick Reference Guide

(Layout Note: All pages number citations should match the page where the section begins in the body of the book itself.)

Determination of Critical Effects:

Table 1-1: Critical Effect Factor Levels
Factor Level Severity
5 above minimum attack roll Mild
10 above minimum attack roll Moderate
15 above minimum attack roll Serious
Table 1-2: Body Location
Roll 1d20 Body Location
1-4 Arm: Any appendage used to manipulate objects or to attack.
5-7 Tail: Used for either balance, movement or attacking.
8-11 Leg: Any appendage used primarily for movement and sometimes to attack (kicking).
12-15 Torso: The main or central body usually containing most of the vital organs.
16-18 Wing: Any appendage used primarily for flight and sometimes to attack (buffeting).
19-20 Head: Usually contains the creature’s brain, mouth and most of its sensory organs.
Table 1-3: Body Profiles
Profile Name Typeof die used Page Number Examples
Abomination 1d4   blood boulder, chaos beast, darkmantle, gibbering mouther, grick, hovara, mimic, otyugh and ort.
Bipedal 1d6   digester, ethereal marauder and tyrannosaurus rex.
Dibrachium 1d6   cuttershark, merfolk, salamander, and sea lion.
Draconic 1d10   asherake, balor, chromithian, dragon, gargoyle, griffon, lammasu, manticore, pegasus and sphinx.
Eight-legged Beast 1d12   aranea, basilisk, scorpion and phase spider.
Four-legged Beast 1d8   aboleth, achaierai, arrowhawk, bulette, hellhound, kytus, lillend, owdi, stark, tarrasque, tumble ox, unicorn, worg and wyvern.
Humanoid 1d8   elf, ettercap, ghoul, giant, grimlock, hobgoblin, hound archon, kith, kobold, lizardfolk, medusa nymph, ogre, picker, satyr.
Serpentine 1d4   frostbiter, frost worm, naga, purple worm, scavan, slather and thoqqua.
Six-legged Beast 1d10   ankheg, ebon spider, formian, rust monster, shock beetle and xill.
Table 1-4: Abomination Profile
Die Rolled 1d4 Body Location Hit Called Shot Penalty
1 Sensory Organ -8
2 Mouth -6
3 Main Body (torso) -3
4 Appendage -5
Table 1-5: Bipedal Profile
Die Roll 1d6 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage (Right) -5
2 Appendage (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Head -8
6 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-6: Dibrachium Profile
Die Roll 1d6 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage (Right) -5
2 Appendage (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Head -8
6 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-7: Draconic Profile
Die Roll 1d10 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg (Right) -5
2 Leg (Left) -5
3 Torso -3
4 Tail -3
5 Wing (Right) -5
6 Wing (Left) -5
7 Arm (Right) -5
8 Arm (Left) -5
9 Head -8
10 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-8: Eight-legged Beast Profile
Die Roll 1d12 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage ( A ) -5
2 Appendage ( B ) -5
3 Appendage ( C ) -5
4 Appendage ( D ) -5
5 Appendage ( E ) -5
6 Appendage ( F ) -5
7 Appendage ( G ) -5
8 Appendage ( H ) -5
9 Head -8
10 Body (or Thorax) -3
11 Tail (or Abdomen) -3
12 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-9: Four-legged Beast Profile
d8 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg ( A ) -5
2 Leg ( B ) -5
3 Leg ( C ) -5
4 Leg ( D ) -5
5 Torso -3
6 Tail -3
7 Head -8
8 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-10: Humanoid Profile
d8 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Leg (Right) -5
2 Leg (Left) -5
3 Arm (Right) -5
4 Arm (Left) -5
5 Torso -3
6 Tail or Roll Again -3
7 Head -8
8 Additional Body Part or Roll Again As per Body Part
Table 1-11: Serpentine Profile
Die Roll 1d4 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Torso -3
2 Tail -3
3 Head -8
4 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-12: Six-legged Beast Profile
Die Roll 1d10 Body Location Called Shot Penalty
1 Appendage ( A ) -5
2 Appendage ( B ) -5
3 Appendage ( C ) -5
4 Appendage ( D ) -5
5 Appendage ( E ) -5
6 Appendage ( F ) -5
7 Head -8
8 Body (or Thorax) -3
9 Tail (or Abdomen) -3
10 Roll Again OR GM’s choice NA
Table 1-13: Hit Point Method
Mild blood loss Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Moderate blood loss Target takes an extra d6 hit points per round until treated
Heavy blood loss Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Table 1-13A: Hit Point Method and Loss of Limb According to Body Type
Abomination Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, eight-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, six-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Beast, four-legged Target takes an extra d4 hit points per round until treated
Draconic Target takes an extra d6 hit points per round until treated
Bipedal Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Dibrachium Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Humanoid Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Serpentine Target takes an extra d8 hit points per round until treated
Table 1-14: Constitution Loss Method
Mild blood loss Target takes 1 point Constitution damage every 2 minutes until treated
Moderate blood loss Target takes 1 point Constitution damage every minute until treated
Heavy blood loss Target takes 2 points Constitution damage every minutes until treated
Table 1-14A: Constitution and Loss of Limb According to Body Type
Abomination If target has limbs, 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, eight-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, six-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Beast, four-legged Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Draconic Target takes 1 point of Constitution damage every 2 rounds until treated
Bipedal Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Dibrachium Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Humanoid Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Serpentine Target takes 2 points of Constitution damage every round until treated
Table 1-15: Limb Removal and Hit Point Loss
Abomination If has limbs, -5% of total hit points
Beast, eight-legged -5% of total hit points
Beast, six-legged -10% of total hit points
Beast, four-legged -10% of total hit points
Draconic -10% of total hit points
Bipedal -15% of total hit points
Dibrachium -15% of total hit points
Humanoid -15% of total hit points
Serpentine -15% of total hit points for the tail (lower part of the body)
Table 1-17: Called Shot Penalties
Body Location Called Shot Penalty
Head -8
Sensory Organs -8
Mouth -6
Body (torso) -3
Tail (abdomen) -3
Appendages (Arms, Legs, Wings) -5
Table 1-18: Critical Fumbles
Total Score Fumble Effect
1 You strike ally – You strike an ally within your weapon’s reach/range (Gamemaster’s choice). Damage inflicted equals the weapon’s unmodified base damage.
2 You fall on weapon– You strike yourself with your own weapon. Damage inflicted equals the weapon’s unmodified base damage.
3 You lose your weapon. Roll for direction (1d8 on a compass) and distance (odd= 5 ft. even=10ft.).
4 You trip – You lose your footing and fall prone; you must use a standard or movement action to regain your footing (this does provoke an attack of opportunity).
5 You are disoriented – You get turned around and lose your action for the rest of this round and the next (this does not provoke an attack of opportunity).
6 You overextend your attack – You lunge or swing too wide and provoke an attack of opportunity from any hostile opponents in range to do so.
7 You are considered Dazed for one full round as you regain your composure (this provokes an attack of opportunity).
8 GM’s choice
Table 4-4: Critical Spell Damage
Factor Level Severity
Failed save by 5 Mild: Victim takes an additional 1 hit point per die of the spell.
 Failed save by 10 Moderate: Victim takes an additional 2 hit points per die of the spell.
Failed save by 15 Serious: Victim takes an additional 3 hit points per die of the spell.
Table 5-2: Critical Damage from Traps
Die Roll (1d6) Critical Effect
Left Leg Broken bone. Victim’s movement rate drops by half, suffers a –8 penalty to any skill check involving that leg and loses all Dexterity bonuses to AC (if any).
Right Leg Broken bone. Victim’s movement rate drops by half, suffers a –8 penalty to any skill checks involving that leg and loses all Dexterity bonuses to AC (if any).
Left Arm Broken bone. Victim suffers a –8 penalty to any attacks or skill checks involving that arm.
Right Arm Broken bone. Victim suffers a –8 penalty to any attacks or skill checks involving that arm.
Head Cracked skull. Victim must roll a Fortitude save (DC 17) or loses consciousness for 2d4 minutes, but suffers no other ill affects after awakening.
Back (torso) Cracked ribs. Victim suffers a –5 penalty to attacks and skill checks that involve physical movement. This also slows down the victim, reducing his base movement rate by 25%.

Healing-Related Tables

Table 2-1: Healing Factor Levels
Factor Level DC Requirements
0 15 Minimum required DC to be successful
1 20 5 above minimum required DC to be successful
2 25 10 above minimum required DC to be successful
3 30 15 above minimum required DC to be successful
Table 2-2: First Aid Factor Levels
First Aid Factor Level DC Result
0 15 Stabilization only
1 20 Stabilization plus 1d2 hp
2 25 Stabilization plus 1d4 hp
3 30 Stabilization plus 1d6 hp
Table 2-3: Short-Term Care Factor Levels
Short-Term Care Factor Level DC Result
0 15 No extra hit points restored
1 20 Restoration of 1d4 hp + patient’s Con modifier
2 25 Restoration of 1d6 hp + patient’s Con modifier
3 30 Restoration of 1d8 hp + patient’s Con modifier
Table 2-4: Long-Term Care Factor Levels
Long-Term Care Factor Level DC Result
0 15 Normal rate of healing (1 hp per level or 1 ability point per day)
1 20 Double rate of healing (2 hp per level or 2 ability points per day)
2 25 Triple rate of healing (3 hp per level or 3 ability points per day)
3 30 Quadruple rate of healing (4 hp per level or 4 ability points per day)
Table 2-5: Wound Modifiers
Wound Category Total Percentage Loss of HP Healing DC Modifier
Minor 1 – 20% +0
Mild 21 – 40% +1
Moderate 41 – 60% +2
Severe 61 – 80% +3
Life-Threatening 81 – 100% +6
Table 2-6: Critical Effects Modifiers
Critical Effect Typeand Category Healing DC Modifier Time to Heal (Unaided/Aided)
Mild (Bludgeoning) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Mild (Piercing) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Mild (Slashing) +4 3 weeks/2 weeks
Moderate (Bludgeoning) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks
Moderate (Piercing) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks
Moderate (Slashing) +8 6 weeks/4 weeks
Table 2-7: Treating Specific Wound Types
Wound Type DC Modifier Required Equipment (Masterwork Healer’s kit plus below)
Broken Bone +6 Bone setting kit
Compound Fracture +8 Bone setting kit and Field medic kit
Concussion +4 Masterwork Healer’s kit only
Deep Laceration +4 Field medic kit or Surgical kit
Severed Limb +10 Surgical kit and Bone setting kit
Table 2-8: Curative Spells and Critical Healing
Cure minor wounds Cure light wounds Cure moderate wounds Cure serious wounds Cure critical wounds Heal
Cannot heal critical wounds Heals mild critical effects only Heals mild critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 1d8 hp +1 per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 2d8 +1 hp per caster level Heals mild critical effects + 8 hp per caster level (max. 150)
  Cannot heal moderate critical effects Heals moderate critical effects only Heals moderate critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals moderate critical effects + 1d8 hp +1 per caster level Heals moderate critical effects + 6 hp per caster level (max. 150)
    Cannot heal serious critical effects Heals serious critical effects only Heals serious critical effects + 1d4 hp +1 per caster level Heals serious critical effects + 4 hp per caster level (max. 150)
Table 2-9: Scarring Modifiers
Degree of damage incurred Scar Modifier Charisma Skill Modifier
1 – 20% loss of total hit points in a single attack +1
21 – 40% loss of total hit points in a single attack +3 -1
41 – 60% loss of total hit points in a single attack +5 -2
61 – 80% loss of total hit points in a single attack +7 -3
81 – 100% loss of total hit points in a single attack +10 -4
Mild critical wound +3 -1
Moderate critical wound +5 -2
Serious critical wound +10 -4
Table 2-10: Shapechanging Benefits
Source of shapechange Benefit received
Alter self 1d2 hit point per HD or character level
Animal shapes 1d2+1 hit point per HD or character level
Baleful polymorph 1d3 hit point per HD or character level
Beast shape 1d3+1 hit point per HD or character level
Gaseous form 1d4 hit points per HD or character level
Iron body Number of hit points equal to Con modifier x2 per HD or character level
Polymorph Number of hit points equal to Con modifier per HD or character level
Polymorph any object Number of hit points equal to Con modifier per HD or character level
Shapechange 1d6+1 hit points per HD or character level
Alternate Form (Su) 4 hit points per HD or character level
Alter Self (Su) 2 hit point per HD or character level

Appendix II: Spells

Bard Spells

3rd Level

Mortal Wound: Victim believes that the next wound he takes will be fatal.

Cleric Spells

2nd Level

Remove Scars: Remove physical scarring on an individual at one square inch/caster level and reduce any Charisma penalties associated with scarring.

3rd Level

Heal Broken Bones: Heal broken bones at a rate of 1d6 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Mend Severed Limb: Graft the severed limb of a creature back to its body and heal 1d4 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Rescue: Teleport an incapacitated ally to your side.

4th-Level

Bloodletting: Any wound caused by a slashing or piercing weapon continues to bleed for a loss of 1 hp each round per wound.

Fortify Armor: Fortify the more vulnerable areas of armor to reduce the likelihood of a critical hit or sneak attack and decrease the severity of a critical effect.

Mortal Wound: Victim believes that the next wound he takes will be fatal.

Power Word: Bone-shatter: Causes a number of minor bones to crack and splinter dealing 3d8 hp damage and 1d8 hp the following round.

5th-Level

Bonebrittle: Weakens a target’s bones, making him more susceptible to a Moderate critical effect.

Damage Reduction: Temporarily gain damage reduction.

Finger of Life: Deliver healing spells up to 3rd level to any creature within range.

Headsman’s Caress: Potentially behead your target with an arc of magical energy.

Heal Critical Injuries: Heal critical wounds at a rate of 1d12 + 1 point/caster level (max. +10).

6th-Level

Restore Sanity: Heal individuals that are stricken with a mental disease or are subjected to mind-affecting spells.

8th-Level

Greater Finger of Life: Deliver healing magic up to 5th level to any creature within range.

Druid Spells

2nd Level

Remove Scars: Remove physical scarring on an individual at one square inch/caster level and reduce any Charisma penalties associated with scarring.

3rd Level

Rescue: Teleport an incapacitated ally to your side.

4th-Level

Heal Broken Bones: Heal broken bones at a rate of 1d6 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Mend Severed Limb: Graft the severed limb of a creature back to its body and heal 1d4 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

5th-Level

Damage Reduction: Temporarily gain damage reduction.

Finger of Life: Deliver healing spells up to 3rd level to any creature within range.

6th-Level

Heal Critical Injuries: Heal critical wounds at a rate of 1d12 + 1 point/caster level (max. +10).

7th-Level

Restore Sanity: Heal individuals that are stricken with a mental disease or are subjected to mind-affecting spells.

Paladin Spells

2nd Level

Remove Scars: Remove physical scarring on an individual at one square inch/caster level and reduce any Charisma penalties associated with scarring.

3rd Level

Heal Broken Bones: Heal broken bones at a rate of 1d6 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Mend Severed Limb: Graft the severed limb of a creature back to its body and heal 1d4 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

4th-Level

Fortify Armor: Fortify the more vulnerable areas of armor to reduce the likelihood of a critical hit or sneak attack and decrease the severity of a critical effect.

Ranger Spells

2nd Level

Remove Scars: Remove physical scarring on an individual at one square inch/caster level and reduce any Charisma penalties associated with scarring.

4th-Level

Heal Broken Bones: Heal broken bones at a rate of 1d6 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Mend Severed Limb: Graft the severed limb of a creature back to its body and heal 1d4 + 1 point/caster level (max. +7).

Sorcerer/Wizard Spells

4th-Level

Ar’ryn’s Eldritch Bolts: Glowing bolts of force strike a target for 1d4 + 1hp/2 caster levels of physical damage.

Bloodletting: Any wound caused by a slashing or piercing weapon continues to bleed for a loss of 1 hp each round per wound.

Mortal Wound: Victim believes that the next wound he takes will be fatal.

Power Word: Bone-shatter: Causes a number of minor bones to crack and splinter dealing 3d8 hp damage and 1d8 hp the following round.

Shield-motes: A number of small motes of glowing light continually float about the caster intercepting and deflecting a single physical attack each.

5th-Level

Bonebrittle: Weakens a target’s bones, making him more susceptible to a Moderate critical effect.

Damage Reduction: Temporarily gain damage reduction.

Headsman’s Caress: Potentially behead your target with an arc of magical energy.

Appendix III: Body Profiles

The following tables are designed to help Game Masters track critical effects during combat. Simply choose the correct table and make a notation or mark in the corresponding box. These tables maybe freely photocopied or scanned for your personal use.

General Body Location Critical Effect Tracker

  Arm Tail Leg Torso Wing Head
Mild-Bludgeoning            
Mild-Piercing            
Mild-Slashing            
Moderate-Bludgeoning            
Moderate-Piercing            
Moderate-Slashing            
Serious-Bludgeoning            
Serious-Piercing            
Serious-Slashing            

Beasts (4-8 Legs) Body Profiles [V – you will have to lengthen this table to cover the width of the page in order to make it work right]

  Appendage 1 Appendage 2 Appendage 3 Appendage 4 Appendage 5 Appendage 6 Appendage 7 Appendage 8 Head Body Tail
Mild-Bludgeoning                      
Mild-Piercing                      
Mild-Slashing                      
Moderate-Bludgeoning                      
Moderate-Piercing                      
Moderate-Slashing                      
Serious-Bludgeoning                      
Serious-Piercing                      
Serious-Slashing                      

Biped & Dibrachium Body Profiles

  Appendage (R) Appendage (L) Torso Tail Head
Mild-Bludgeoning          
Mild-Piercing          
Mild-Slashing          
Moderate-Bludgeoning          
Moderate-Piercing          
Moderate-Slashing          
Serious-Bludgeoning          
Serious-Piercing          
Serious-Slashing          

Draconic Body Profiles

  Leg (R) Leg (L) Torso Tail Wing (R) Wing (L) Arm (R) Arm (L) Head
Mild-Bludgeoning                  
Mild-Piercing                  
Mild-Slashing                  
Moderate-Bludgeoning                  
Moderate-Piercing                  
Moderate-Slashing                  
Serious-Bludgeoning                  
Serious-Piercing                  
Serious-Slashing                  

Humanoid Body Profiles

  Leg (R) Leg (L) Arm (R) Arm (L) Torso Tail Head Other
Mild-Bludgeoning                
Mild-Piercing                
Mild-Slashing                
Moderate-Bludgeoning                
Moderate-Piercing                
Moderate-Slashing                
Serious-Bludgeoning                
Serious-Piercing                
Serious-Slashing                

Serpent Body Profiles

  Torso Tail Head
Mild-Bludgeoning      
Mild-Piercing      
Mild-Slashing      
Moderate-Bludgeoning      
Moderate-Piercing      
Moderate-Slashing      
Serious-Bludgeoning      
Serious-Piercing      
Serious-Slashing      
Section 15: Copyright Notice

Torn Asunder: Critical Hits PFRPG Edition, Copyright 2010, DragonWing Games; Authors Steven Creech and Kevin Ruesch