Home >Races >3rd Party Races >Storm Bunny Studios >

The Automata

Note: This page includes images and Product Identity owned by Storm Bunny Studios. It is used here by permission of Storm Bunny Studios and is not Open Game Content.

If you like this race and are interested in seeing more from Storm Bunny Studios, check out the Rhune: Dawn of Twilight Campaign Guide, available at the Open Gaming Store!

Designer’s Note

The automata are a fairly powerful race, especially at low levels (and this is doubly true for the Sigrún model). This was intended. When considered solely from a mechanical perspective, most automata start with an unfair advantage. However, when placed within the greater context of the setting, several factors balance them out. First, very few of the common people trust the automata, and as a result, few will grant them honor—even when they deserve it. Thus, automata always earn honor at half of the speed of other races.

Second, as unnatural creatures awakened by their fellows, automata are considered to be unfated; they never gain access to wyrd, nor do they ever gain wyrd points. GMs, of course, are welcome to remove both of these penalties better fit their stories, but should do so understanding that this might unbalance the races some. The DC of this ability is Intelligence-based.

ALTERNATIVELY! Storm Bunny Studios has released EXCLUSIVELY FOR d20PFSRD.COM users, the COMPLETE 1st chapter 100% FREE! Download it now to see if you might like the real deal!

The automata are a race of awakened, free-willed clockwork machines living in and around the City-States of Vallinar. They are sometimes called “Clickers” or “Ticktocks,” although most civilized people frown upon these derogatory terms. Before the Rebellion of the Awakened, the automata were two things—very popular and very simple. Kept as pets by wealthy eccentrics or as heavy labor support by the captains of industry, they performed a wide array of tasks. Intelligent and easily programmed, they worked the docks of Union City and mined ore for the dwarves under the Redwall Mountains.

In other places—like Damas—they served in more complex roles, sometimes performing repetitive, detailed tasks. Some of the most advanced models even saw service as diplomats and scouts in the city of Vallingard itself. In the City-States of Vallinar, everything ran smoothly with the automata in place. Although there is great debate among scholars, most people agree that the Rebellion of the Awakened was the automata’s most defining moment in history. Magically awakened by a clockwork wizard named Ashnu, they worked amongst themselves in secret to become a sentient race of walking machines that, for good or ill, would have their freedom.

Physical Description: Automata are generally humanoid in design, although all—especially the Sigrún model—are clearly machines. Covered in runes and plated with armor, nearly all of the models have metallic bodies suited for their social function.

The Eir model is the plainest of the automata. Designed for labor, it possesses elongated arms, a reinforced torso, large legs, and even larger gears. Its head is set between its massive shoulders. Although it was originally designed to mimic the appearance of larger humans of Midgard, its gearing (and the placement of its “face”) gives it a very distinctive appearance. It is sometimes called a “labor model” because of this. It has only moderate armor covering its frame.

The Gondul model is the smallest of its cousins, with a sleek and slender frame. It is lightly armored, short, and incredibly quick. It has a humanoid face and a large, concave gear that extends up from between its shoulders. This gear guards its spine, but also gives it a very unique look. It is often covered in blue runes.

Towering over others of its kind, the Sigrún (“the storm model“) is easily the largest of the automata. It was originally built similar to the Eir model, but with a slightly larger frame. With each successive model, however, it grew a little more. It is a large creature protected by massive, heavy plates. Like the Eir model, it enjoys ample armor on its upper body. When used for combat purposes, this model deploys with a reinforced tower shield and heavy polearm.

The most delicate of automata, the Skuld model is distinctive in a number of ways. The first thing most notice is the large, crescent-shaped gear that frames its humanoid head. Although this gear retracts into its frame, very few of the Skuld choose to hide this feature. Secondly, it is by far the most human in appearance—a fact that unnerves nearly as many people as it comforts. Although it possesses light armor plating, it appears much like normal armor from a distance. Built to mimic men and women, this model stands approximately five and a half feet.

Society: Automata are very social and order themselves surprisingly well. Many “adopt” families that share similar goals, and when they bond with others, it is normally for life. While automata no longer occupy the same subservient roles in society they were created for, many continue to work in these areas for a number of reasons. Some excel in these areas and, even awakened, find great joy in service. Others, lacking direction, maintain these occupations out of a sense of regularity and stability. A select group of automata known as the Watch Wardens continues to train beside the dwarves, preparing for the final conflict that is Ragnarök. Only a rare few adventure, each seeking the many wonders that exists beyond the known borders of the City-States of Vallinar.

Relations: Automata tend to be weary around rural humans and ælves, as both of these races have treated them with contempt (and the latter with outright violence) in the past. Automata favor clockwork elves—their creators—more than any other race, and will generally defer to them in most social settings. Most automata have a dim outlook about their place among the other intelligent races, realizing they were created to serve and that their awakening was never intended.

Alignment and Religion: Automata tend to choose their faiths and religious customs according to the cultures they are (or were) awakened into. Not all, however, feel such a need. Just as many automata disdain religion as adopt it, with many in the former group pointing out the Æssinyr never created them in the first place—the clockwork elves did. However, just as many argue that their creation was part of a greater divine plan. For obvious reasons, most automata tend to favor technology and side with the dwarves when the topic of Ragnarök comes up.

While few are eager for war, they realize (quite correctly) that if the ælves had their way, they’d be completely wiped out with the rest of the “clockwork machine.” Automata tend to be very ordered, relying on patterns of regularity modeled after their old programming. Although they are awakened and free, most observe regular activities that border on ritual. Thus, most tend to be lawful in alignment.

Adventurers: After the Rebellion of the Awakened, most of the sentient automata either fled the City-States of Vallinar or were forced into exile. The resulting adventures were more than most of the automata cared for and many, upon returning to the cities, found they had little taste for such foolhardy quests. A few, however, found their sense of exploration emboldened by their trials and began to actively seek out any job that promised a hint of danger and a chance at “really living.” Today, only a small number of automata adventure. Those that do generally do so more for the experience than for the monetary rewards, a fact that makes them popular with many adventuring groups.

Names: The automata, unlike most races, have no real naming conventions. As a result, their names vary wildly, sometimes without heed to origin or embraced gender. Some automata name themselves according to their professions, while others adopt completely unique names.

Generating Ability Scores

Because the automata lack a Constitution score, players generating ability scores using the purchase method need to reduce the number of points they spend at character creation. Players should begin play with following points (according to their campaign type): 8 points for low fantasy, 12 points for standard fantasy, 17 points for high fantasy, and 21 points for epic fantasy. Players generating ability scores using methods that require them to roll dice need only reduce the number of rolls proportionately. Furthermore, because automata lack a Constitution score, some Constitution-based class abilities (like a barbarian’s rage) will be far less effective for players who choose them. Players should consider this when building characters.

Standard Racial Traits

Automata characters, regardless of model or design, possess the following racial traits.

  • Ability Score Modifiers: Varies by model (see models below).
  • Size: Varies by model (see models below).
  • Type: Automata are constructs (but with some special rules, see below).
  • Base Speed: Automata have a base speed of 30 feet.
  • Languages: All automata begin play speaking Clockspeak. Automata with a high Intelligence score can select bonus languages from any of the common tongues. See the Linguistics skill page for more information about these languages.

Defense Racial Traits

  • Armored: Automata begin play with special plating that counts as armor and cannot wear additional armor (but may use shields). Models suffer an armor check penalty according to the plating they begin play with; this is listed under each entry. Moreover, this armor interferes with arcane spellcasting (just like wearing most armor does). As a result, automata suffer a chance of arcane spell failure according to their type:
    • The Sigrún model suffers a 30% chance of spell failure
    • The Eir model suffers a 20% chance of spell failure
    • The Gondul and Skuld models both suffer a 10% chance of spell failure.
Each automata’s built-in plating can be enchanted as normal, but is treated as having an inherent +1 enhancement for the purposes of calculating cost. For example, enchanting the built in armor to +1 costs 4,000 gp.

Misc. Racial Traits

  • Clockwork Body: While automata are sentient constructs, most models are more fragile than normal constructs. Automata receive bonus hit points by model instead of by their size. All automata are built around one of four basic models, gaining additional traits according to this model (see “models” below). Automata never gain construction points.
  • Clockwork Knowledge: All automata have an innate understanding of how their bodies work and can use that knowledge elsewhere. They receive a +2 racial bonus to Craft (clockworks) and Disable Device skill checks.
  • Clockwork Points: All automata receive a number of points they can spend to modify or otherwise customize their bodies. These points are assigned by model and type. See “clockwork modifications” for more information.

Senses Racial Traits

  • Essential Senses: All automata can speak, hear, and see normally. Additionally, automata possess normal and low-light vision, but unlike normal constructs, they do not possess darkvision. Automata do not feel pain or temperature (although they are affected by temperature normally). Automata do not have a sense of smell and cannot be nauseated or sickened by vaporous conditions. As a result, all automata may only make sight- and sound-based Perception checks (they cannot make taste, touch, or smell-based Perception checks).

Weakness Racial Traits

  • Environmentally Sensitive: Most automata are constructed with delicate parts that are sensitive to extreme conditions. Automata operating in extremely cold temperatures (below 0 degrees F) slow considerably, reducing movement by 10 ft. and gaining the staggered condition. Likewise, automata operating in extremely hot conditions (above 110 degrees F) frequently begin to “short circuit,” gaining the sickened condition.
  • Frail Core: Automata are sentient constructs and have an imperfect connection to the natural world. Any automata that is reduced to 0 hit points is considered staggered. Automata are completely destroyed when they are reduced to a negative hit point total equal to or exceeding their Charisma score. Automata, once destroyed, cannot be raised or resurrected. In addition, electricity damage may temporarily disrupt an automata’s clockwork mind. An automata that suffers electrical damage totaling more than 25% of its total hit points in a single round is staggered for 1d4 rounds.
  • Nature’s Curse: The automata suffer from a weak connection to nature. When casting spells from the druid or ranger spell lists, all automata suffer a -2 penalty to caster level checks made to overcome spell resistance and a -2 penalty to spell DCs. Additionally, automata suffer a -4 penalty on all Charisma-based skill checks that involve natural creatures (like animals) or their allies (like druids).
  • Repair Dependent: Automata cannot heal damage on their own. Automata damaged remain thus until repaired. Repairing an automata requires a DC 15 Craft (clockworks) check; this takes two hours and the automata regains 2 hit points, plus 2 additional hit points for every 5 points by which the skill check exceeds the DC. Automata are not healed through normal, divine healing or channeled energy, but may be healed by specialized spells such as repair construct or by make whole, which repairs 3d6 hit points of damage.
  • Sentient Mind: Automata, unlike most constructs, are susceptible to mind-affecting effects (charms, compulsions, morale effects, patterns, and phantasms). Although they may be charmed or compelled into service, automata are particularly resistant to enchantments and receive a +2 to their Will saving throws to resist these effects.
  • Skill Restriction: Because of their design and weight, automata always fail swim checks (although magic that confers the ability to swim still works on an automata normally).
  • Therma-Torque Clockwork Engine: While Automata do not need to breathe, eat, or sleep, they can only operate up to twenty hours each day before they need stop for self-maintenance. All automata must shut down for four hours a day to recharge their therma-torque engine. Automata that fail to recharge gain the fatigued condition. Automata operating in the fatigued condition for more than 2 hours gain the exhausted condition.

Alternate Racial Traits

  • History’s Herald While most automata focus on technical fields like engineering or clockworks, a few devour the annals of time, instead—combining their impeccable memories with their lust for learning. These automata receive a +2 racial bonus to Knowledge (history) and one other Knowledge skill of their choice. This racial trait replaces clockwork knowledge.

Favored Class Options

  • Favored Class: Automata treat every occupation or job with the same level of dedication. Any class it selects is considered its favored class, regardless of the number of classes it takes. Instead of receiving an additional skill rank or hit point whenever they gain a level in a favored class, automata have the option of gaining an additional ¼ Clockwork Point.

Models

They are: The Sigrún (“the storm model“), the Gondul (“the scout“), the Eir (“the labor model“), and the Skuld (“the diplomat“).

Each particular model has specific traits that define them, in addition to varying pools of “clockwork points” that can be used to further customize them.

Editor’s Note: Automata have armor plates that grant them an armor bonus to their AC. This is intentionally not a ” natural armor bonus” in order to prevent stacking with any additional armor worn.

Sigrún—The Storm

Built to rend the flesh from giants, the Sigrún model is the heartiest and the largest of all the automata. It is a towering wall of steel, iron, and precision that offers no quarter on the battlefield.

  • Ability Score Modifiers: Sigrún models are incredibly strong, but lack the aesthetic appeal of the other automata. They gain +4 Strength but suffer -2 Charisma.
  • Size: (Large) Sigrún models are large and heavily armored. They suffer a -1 size penalty to AC, a -1 size penalty on attack rolls, a +1 bonus to Combat Maneuver Bonus and Combat Maneuver Defense, and a -4 size penalty on Stealth checks. Unlike most large creatures, theses automata do not naturally have reach (although many do use reach weapons).
  • Base Speed: (Slow n’ Steady) Sigrún models have a base speed of 20 ft. They receive a +4 racial bonus to CMD vs. attacks that would knock them prone. They cannot run.
  • Heavily Armored: Sigrún models have thick armor plates built into their frame, protecting their critical areas. As a result, they have a +8 armor bonus, an armor check penalty of -6, and maximum Dex bonus of +2. Additionally, many Sigrún models employ tower shields, and are proficient with shields. These automata are treated as if wearing heavy armor.
  • Fortified Frame: All Sigrún models begin play with 16 hit points. They determine additional hit points according to class selection.
  • Critical Push: Sigrún models hit hard. Whenever one confirms a critical hit on a creature smaller than itself, it may make a free combat maneuver check to push back its target. If successful, it pushes the target back 10 ft.
  • Clockwork Points: Sigrún models were built primarily for combat and defense. They receive only 2 clockwork points (CPs) for additional customizations, plus an additional 1 CP at 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter.

Gondul—The Scout

  • Small and fast, the Gondul was designed to scout out and report enemy movements. Although it is the smallest and weakest of the models, its lithe frame and unnatural speed makes it harder to catch than other models.
    • Ability Score Modifiers: Gondul models are small and quick, but lack other notable characteristics. They gain +2 Dexterity.
    • Size: Small Gondul models are Small creatures. They gain a +1 size bonus to their AC, a +1 size bonus on attack rolls, a—1 penalty to their Combat Maneuver Bonus and Combat Maneuver Defense, and a +4 size bonus on Stealth checks.
    • Base Speed: Gondul models are quick and have a base speed of 40 ft.
    • Lightly Armored: Gondul models are lightly armored, with thin armor plates protecting only their most critical areas. As a result, they begin play with a +2 armor bonus, no armor check penalty, and a maximum Dex bonus of +6. These automata are treated as if wearing light armor.
    • Fortified Frame: Gondul models begin play with 6 hit points. They determine additional hit points according to class selection.
    • Burst of Speed: Gondul models were designed for speed and they have a pool of speed points they can access. Each model has a number of speed points equal to twice their Dexterity modifier. Throughout the day, they can spend these points (as part of a move action) to move an additional 5 ft. for every point spent.
    • Clockwork Points: Gondul models were built to be small, fast scouts. They receive 3 clockwork points (CPs) for additional customizations, plus an additional 2 CP at 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter.

    Eir—The Worker

  • Originally designed to complement soldiers on the battlefield, this model was quickly adopted to industrial tasks, as it could outperform and outlast men and dwarves alike. It is commonly known as the worker, a title some of the Awakened resent.
    • Ability Score Modifiers: Eir models are strong and smart, but built for labor and lack visual appeal. They gain +2 Strength and +2 Intelligence but suffer -2 Charisma.
    • Size: Medium Eir models are Medium creatures that have no bonuses or penalties due to their size.
    • Base Speed: Eir models have a base speed of 30 feet.
    • Moderately Armored: Eir models have standard armor plates built into their frame, protecting their critical areas. As a result, they begin play with a +6 armor bonus, an armor check penalty of -4, and a maximum Dex bonus of +3. These automata are treated as if wearing medium armor.
    • Fortified Frame: Eir models begin play with 10 hit points. They determine additional hit points according to class selection.
    • Long Life: Eir models were designed for heavy labor and can operate longer than other models before they need to stop for self-maintenance. Eir models can operate twice as long (up to 40 hours) before they must recharge their therma-torque engines. Eir models with classes that require rest to recharge class-based abilities (like a wizard resting to prepare spells) must still satisfy those requirements normally.
    • Clockwork Points: Eir models were built to be general laborers and saw wide use in a multitude of areas. They receive 4 clockwork points (CPs) for additional customizations, plus an additional 3 CP at 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter.

    Skuld—The Diplomat

  • The smartest of all the automata, the Skuld model was originally designed to command troops and operate independent of its dwarven or human masters. Its advanced programming and accelerated intelligence made it the perfect diplomat, a role it filled throughout the Kingdom of Vallinar.
    • Ability Score Modifiers: Skuld models are smart and independent, but weaker than other automata. They gain +2 Intelligence and +2 Charisma but suffer -2 Strength.
    • Size: Medium Skuld models are Medium creatures that have no bonuses or penalties due to their size.
    • Base Speed: Skuld models have a base speed of 30 feet.
    • Lightly Armored: Skuld models are lightly armored, with thin armor plates protecting only their most critical areas. As a result, they begin play with a +2 armor bonus, no armor check penalty, and a maximum Dex bonus of +6. These automata are treated as if wearing light armor.
    • Fortified Frame: Skuld model begins play with 6 hit points. They determine additional hit points according to class selection.
    • Diplomat’s Favor: Skuld models were designed primarily for use in court. Their programming grants them a racial bonus equal to 1/2 their hit dice (minimum 1) on two of the following skills (chosen at character creation): Bluff, Diplomacy, Knowledge (nobility), Linguistics, and Sense Motive.
    • Clockwork Points: Skuld models were built to be intelligent and diplomatic. They receive 3 clockwork points (CPs) for additional customizations, plus an additional 2 CP at 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter.

    Clockwork Customizations

    All automata are eligible for customization and players may customize their characters either at character creation or later in play. In order for a player to customize her automata character, she need only locate a craftsman willing to do the work, pay the cost (in CPs—clockwork points—and associated gold), and have an unmodified location available. The craftsman must succeed at a Craft (clockworks) check. The DC is 10 for a minor customization, 20 for a major customization, and 30 for a greater customization. Automata are limited in the number of customizations they may receive. In addition, some customizations are only available to higher level automata who have greater ability to adapt to extensive customization. All automata characters start play with one free minor customization. This free customization still costs CP and takes up a location as usual. Only the number of clockwork points they can spend and space available for additional customizations limits automata.

    Story Seed: Found Treasure

    Automata can receive upgraded or replacement components from a number of sources, and a chestplate recently installed on a member of the party has a map drawn on the inside, along with a note, “Great riches!” The handwriting is very similar to the character’s, but just a little different. Additionally, there are other small pieces attached to other frequently seen or encountered automata. Perhaps they can encourage these other automata to surrender the parts willingly, or they might be forced to give the parts to the party so she characters can complete the image.

    Minor Customizations

    These customizations are available at first level. All cost 2 CP and 1,000 gp.

    • Arcane Circuit (Utility; Chest): The automata’s core glimmers with a delicate tracery of inset arcane metals. The automata’s chance of arcane spell failure is reduced by 10%.
    • Arcane Sigil, minor (Utility; Hand): The automata has a series of complex runes etched into the palm of its hand. It gains one of the following spell-like abilities, usable 3 times per day. Choose from: acid splash, flare, light, or mage hand.
    • Armor, Improved (Armor; Chest): The automata gains additional armor plates, increasing its base armor bonus by 2. In addition, it suffers an additional 10% chance of arcane spell failure and suffers a -1 armor check penalty. These penalties stack with the current penalties.
    • Armor Spikes (Armor; Chest): The automata possesses spikes located throughout its frame that it can deploy or retract as a swift action. These spikes behave like normal armor spikes in all other ways.
    • Climbing Spike (Utility; Feet, Hands): The automata has a spring-driven climbing spike it can deploy to aid in climbing. When deployed, it receives a +4 racial bonus to Climb skill checks set (provided there is a suitable surface to drive the spike into). This bonus stacks with itself (hands and feet). The automata can also use this climbing spike as a weapon, but it only deals 1d2 points of damage (regardless of size). When used as a weapon, the automata is considered proficient with it.
    • Coiled Springs (Movement; Feet): The automata has advanced coils built into its legs and feet that increase its movement (and reaction time). It increases its movement by 10 ft. and gains a +2 racial bonus to Initiative checks. This customization is installed as a set.
    • Deft Machine (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed to maximize its environment and to avoid enemies’ blows in melee combat by tumbling past them. It receives a +2 racial bonus to Acrobatics skill checks and Acrobatics becomes a class skill.
    • Hidden Blade (Combat; Wrist): The automata has a Medium-sized blade built into one of its arms that can be extended as a free action. This blade does damage according to the automata’s size; 1d4 damage for smallsized automata, 1d6 damage for medium-sized automata, and 1d8 damage for large-sized automata. The threat range is always 19-20. Automata are considered proficient with this weapon.
    • Hidden Compartment (Utility; Wrists or Feet): The automata has a small, hidden compartment built into its frame that it can use to hide small objects (under 1 lbs). The automata receives a +4 racial bonus to Sleight of Hand skill checks when placing objects into this compartment. Likewise, creatures searching the automata for hidden objects suffer a -4 penalty to their Perception skill checks to locate objects in the hidden compartment.
    • Knowledge, Languages (Programming; Head): The automata is linguistically advanced. It receives 4 bonus skill points that it must spend in Linguistics (granting it 4 additional languages).
    • Iron Grip (Comat; Hand): The automata has a large, reinforced fist that it uses to better grapple enemy opponents. It gains a +2 racial bonus to CMB to grapple or pin opponents. This bonus doubles if the customization is installed in both hands.
    • Legs, Reinforced (Movement; Feet): The automata has reinforced feet designed for jumping and tumbling. It receives a +4 racial bonus to Acrobatics skill checks. This customization is installed in both feet.
    • Lock Tool (Utility; Wrist): The automata has a device (built into its lower arm) that can be used to pick most locks. It receives a +4 racial bonus to Disable Device skill checks and its arm is considered a set of basic thieves’ tools.
    • Nimble Hands (Utility; Hand): The automata has a finely crafted hand that grants it a bonus to handle small, delicate objects and to cast spells with somatic components. It receives a +2 racial bonus to Sleight of Hand skill checks and reduces its chance of arcane spell failure by 5%. This bonus doubles if the customization is installed in both hands.
    • Perceptive Array (Utility; Shoulders): The automata has small sensors linked into its core programming that heighten its senses. It receives a +2 racial bonus to sight and hearing-based Perception skill checks.
    • Quick Response (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed to react quickly in combat and receives a +2 racial bonus to Initiative checks.
    • Silent Springs (Utility; Feet): The automata has its available voids filled with padding to reduce movement noise. It receives a +4 racial bonus to Stealth skill checks.
    • Slick Armor (Combat; Chest): The automata gains the ability to transfer (as a free action) small amounts of its lubricants to its surface, making it harder to grapple or pin down. The automata gains a +2 bonus to its CMD to resist a grapple.
    • Therma-Torque Support (Utility; Chest): The automata possesses an advanced version of the therma-torque engine that requires less maintenance. The automata may operate an additional 8 hours before it needs to shut down for selfmaintenance.
    • Whip Chain (Utility; Wrist): The automata possesses a strong length of chain that it can use to catch itself when falling. The automata can deploy this chain as an immediate action after failing a Reflex save (or similar roll) that would result in it taking falling damage. The whip chain grants a second save at a +4 racial bonus. It cannot use this as a weapon.

    Major Customizations

    These customizations are available at 4th level. All cost 4 CP and 4,000 gp.

    • Arcane Sigil, Major (Utility; Hand): The automata has a series of complex runes etched into the palm of its hand. It gains one of the following spell-like abilities, usable 3 times per day. The caster level is equal to the automata’s character level. Choose from: corrosive touch, daze monster, magic missile, or shield. The DC of this ability is Intelligence-based.
    • Armor, Efficient (Armor; Chest): The automata’s armor is less restrictive than normal. The automata’s chance of arcane spell failure is reduced by 10% and its armor check penalty is reduced by 2.
    • Armor, Reinforced (Armor; Chest): The automata gains additional armor plates increasing its base armor bonus by 4. In addition, it suffers an additional 20% chance of arcane spell failure and -2 armor check penalty. These penalties stack with the current penalties.
    • Knowledge, Advanced (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about several topics. It receives 6 bonus skill points that it may spend on Knowledge skills.
    • Knowledge, Combat (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with special knowledge that increases its effectiveness in combat. It receives an additional Combat Feat. It must still meet the prerequisites for this Feat.
    • Mithral Fist (Combat; Hand): One of the automata’s hands is replaced with a stronger version made from a special, reinforced material (cold iron, silver, and adamantium are also available) designed to harm supernatural enemies. It gains a slam attacks that deals 1d6 damage and is always considered armed.
    • Reinforced (Armor; Chest, Feet, Head, Shoulders, or Wrist): The automata’s body is reinforced with small (but super strong) mithral plates that provide it with additional resiliency, granting it additional hit points. It gains additional hit points by location; reinforcing the head grants 3 hit points, the chest grants 5 hit points, the shoulders 4 points, the wrists grant 4 points, and the feet grants 4 points. When installed in the feet or wrists, this customization counts as a set.
    • Tactical Defense (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with common knowledge about combat and defense tactics. It receives a +2 dodge bonus to AC.
    • Tactical Offense, Melee (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about melee combat and offensive tactics. It receives a +2 racial bonus to melee attacks.
    • Tactical Offense, Ranged (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about ranged combat and offensive tactics. It receives a +2 racial bonus to ranged attacks.

    Greater Customizations

    These customizations are available at 12th level. All cost 8 CP and 16,000 gp.

    • Arcane Sigil, Greater (Utility; Hand): The automata has a series of complex runes etched into the palm of its hand. It gains one of the following spell-like abilities, usable 3 times per day. The caster level is equal to the automata’s character level. Choose from: blur, glitterdust, scorching ray, or wind wall. The DC of this ability is Intelligence-based.
    • Tactical Defense, Advanced (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about combat and defense tactics. It receives a +3 dodge bonus to AC.
    • Tactical Offense, Advanced Melee (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about melee combat and offensive tactics. It receives a +3 racial bonus to melee attacks.
    • Tactical Offense, Advnaced Ranged (Programming; Head): The automata is programmed with advanced knowledge about ranged combat and offensive tactics.
    Section 15: Copyright Notice

    Rhune: Dawn of Twilight Campaign Guide. Copyright 2016, Storm Bunny Studios, LLC; Authors: Clinton Boomer, Will Cooper, Adam Daigle, Stephen Michael DiPesa, Joshua Kitchens, Ben McFarland, Mike Myler, and Jaye Sonia.