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Spell-Points Magic System

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The core rules presents characters with two kinds of spellcasting – spontaneous spellcasters (who can cast any spell they know but have a very limited number of spells known, such as bards and sorcerers) and preparation spellcasters (who can know a lot of spells but must carefully prepare each one prior to casting, such as clerics, druids, paladins, rangers, and wizards). There is some crossover between these two types (clerics and druids can spontaneously cast one kind of spell each, various archetypes and feats give some additional flexibility to or additional spells known to spontaneous casters), but their core spellcasting ability follows the same general restrictions. Even expansions of the core rules have not provided truly new spellcasting options – though a lot of new classes have been added in later rulebooks, they all still fall into those two broad categories of spellcaster.

The problem with both of these spellcasting types is that they don’t do a very good job of modeling how spellcasters tend to work in popular fantasy fiction. With the exception of stories specifically based on games that use these rules, spellcasters in stories with magic almost never complain about not having prepared the right spell for a specific encounter, or whine that they are limited in how many spells they can learn by some unbreakable mystic limit. Certainly spellcasters seem to want to spend time learning spells, and may wax philosophical about the limits of magic in general, but the common restrictions spontaneous and preparation spellcasters run into is just not a major trope of fantasy. Further, while it is fairly common for literary spellcasters to tire themselves through the use of magic, the existing rules allow sorcerers and wizards both to freely burn through every spell they possess and still be in shape for a long day of jogging up and down mountainsides. A spellcaster may not want to go adventuring when low on spell slots, but he’s certainly not feeling any personal strain from an expenditure of mystic energy.

Going beyond fantasy source material, another reason to consider a spell-point system is for players who like the idea of playing a spellcaster, but hate feeling that they consistently select the wrong spells to know or prepare. While the existing spellcasting systems are well-balanced against other classes for players who know how to maximize the system through a mastery of game mechanics and play experience, there also exist players who just aren’t as good at knowing what spells to have ready. Obviously, in some campaigns it’s just not a good idea for such players to run spellcasters, but that needn’t be the only answer to the situation. If a GM and her players would all like another option, why not provide them one?

These rules aren’t for everyone, and should always be considered “alternate” rules, only for use if a GM and players all want to add something different to a campaign. In the case of Spell Points, the alternate rule is a system to allow all spellcasters to fuel their spells with a pool of spell-points, not requiring any spell preparation, and allowing a spellcaster additional flexibility by using a lot of spell-points to fuel a few high-level spells, or gain extended staying power by restricting casting to a larger number of lower-level spells. Further, the system is designed only for actual spellcasters, ignoring the spell-like abilities of monks and other classes dissimilar enough from true spellcasters to not need the same kind of spell-point house rules. These considerations drive all the design decisions that follow, so if the system as described doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, these rules likely aren’t for you.

Spell Points

Characters using spell-points do not need to prepare spells in advance, and can cast the same spell repeatedly (though there is a cost – see Eldritch Dissonance) or cast spells of a specific level rather than being forced to spread their mystic energy over a range of spells. A spell-point spellcaster can cast a spell as long as he has enough spell-points to cover its cost, though eventually doing so takes a physical toll (see Fatigue and Exhaustion below). A spell-point spellcaster must follow all other rules of spellcasting.

If adapting these rules to classes by third-party publishers, simply determine spell-points the same way as a base class that has the same spells/day (and/ or spells known) chart as the class you are adapting, and then apply the general spell-point rules to that class. If the class duplicates some feature similar to a core class (such as a cleric’s spontaneous casting of cure spells, or a wizard’s extra spell/day from a bonded item) adapt the rules from the base class.

Determining Spell Points

Each class receives a number of spell-points based on its level, as detailed in the charts presented in the class descriptions, below.

Characters also receive bonus spell-points equal to their spellcasting ability score modifier (for the ability that would normally determine the class’s bonus spells). A character is limited to a number of bonus spell-points equal to the highest level spell he can cast.

Naming Spell Points

While “spell-points” is an easy-to-remember and descriptive term that works well for discussion of game mechanics (much like “hit points”), it’s a boring and generic thing for characters to talk about. While there’s no reason to force players to be “in-character” for all discussions of their resources, it can be fun to have a magic cosmology that includes terms for the energy represented by spell-points. The mystic power mages use to fuel their spells is often discussed in fantasy fiction, which can be a good source for finding terms to use in your campaign. Common choices include chi (or qi, but not ki as it already refers to a specific game mechanic), levin, mana, odylic, orgone, prana, seid, and vril.

For example, Eliana is a 5th level sorcerer with a 20 Charisma. While she has a Charisma bonus of +5, since her maximum spell level is 2nd, she receives only 2 bonus spell-points. When she reaches 6th level and her maximum spell level rises to 3rd, she receives 3 bonus spell-points.

Casting With Spell Points

Casting a spell using the spell-point system is extremely similar to the normal spellcasting rules.

Such concerns as casting time, components, arcane spell failure in armor, and concentration checks all work normally. The only difference is that rather than having a number of spell slots or prepared spells, all spell-point spellcasters may cast any spell they know by expending the appropriate number of spell-points from their spell-point pool. The base cost of casting a spell is 1 + spell level (so casting a 5th level spell costs 6 spell-points). Casting the same spell several times in a day can increase its spell-point cost (see Eldritch Dissonance), and many classes have features that create special interactions with spell-points (detailed in each class entry, below), but the core game mechanic is as simple as tracking spell-points in a pool, and spending them as spells are cast.

Cantrips and Orisons

Spontaneous spell-point spellcasters can simply cast any cantrip or orison they know without expending spell-points, but they must have at least 1 spell-point available to do so. If a spontaneous spellcaster has expended all his spell-points for the day, he can no longer cast cantrips or orisons until he regains some spell-points.

Preparation spell-point spellcasters can prepare a number of cantrips or orisons. Each cantrip or orison prepared reduces the number of spell-points in the spellcaster’s spell pool by 1 until the spellcaster next prepares spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the spellcaster to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Such spells remain prepared until the spellcaster next prepares spells.

Fatigue and Exhaustion

While a spell-point spellcaster can cast a comparable number of spells per day as his spontaneous and preparation brethren, he doesn’t get to blithely burn through all his mystic energy without a risk of personal consequences. The additional flexibility that comes from fueling spells with your own mystic energy has a potential price to pay as well – fatigue and (if you keep it up) exhaustion or even unconsciousness.

When a spell-point spellcaster has used half his spell-points, every spell he casts thereafter has a risk of tiring him. Divide the spellcaster’s spell-point total by 50%. This is his open pool, and he suffers no special risks when casting spells using these spell-points. The remainder of his spell-points are his reserve pool. Each time a spell is cast that uses any spell-points from his reserve pool, the spellcaster must make a Will save or become fatigued. If the spellcaster is already fatigued he becomes exhausted, and if already exhausted he falls unconscious. The DC of the Will save is 10 + the number of spell-points used from the reserve pool to cast the spell.

Fatigue, Exhaustion, and Immunities

The fatigue and exhaustion elements of the spell-points rules are a crucial part of their overall balance, but some creatures (such as undead) as immune to the effects of fatigue and exhaustion.

It’s a bad idea to allow undead spellcasters just ignore one of the drawbacks of the system (they’re going to be frightening enough as it is), so a GM should make one of two basic changes when apply spell-point rules to creature immune to getting tired.

The first alternative is to apply the penalties for fatigue and exhaustion even to creatures normally immune to these effects. This is reasonable even for lifeless creatures who never sleep, as these conditions are being used to represent an over-expenditure of internal magic power, rather than a failing of health or physical vigor.

The second option is to leave the immunities in place, but reduce the total spell-points available to such casters to 75% of the normal total. Since this is all effectively part of the open pool, having a lower spell-point total still isn’t that restrictive (since all the spell-points can be expended with no risk of picking up penalties).

The fatigued condition gained as a result of failing the save when using spell-points from the reserve pool cannot be cured, healed, or removed until the spellcaster has regained his spell-points.

Magic abilities that would normally remove fatigue effects (such as a lesser restoration or a lay on hands with the fatigue mercy) instead suspend the effect for 5 minutes per caster level (or character level in the case of supernatural abilities).

When the spellpoint spellcaster regains his spell-points and his reserve pool is full, all fatigue conditions gained by using reserve points end.

Divine Attunement

In campaigns using only spells from the core rules, attunement isn’t much of a limitation, especially at higher levels. For example, there are only 18 7th level spells on the cleric spell list in the core rules – by the time a cleric can cast 7th level spells, he’s sure to have an 18 Wisdom.

However, if a campaign adds numerous additional sources the number of spells in a divine spellcaster’s class list can swell quickly. Unlike arcane preparation spellcasters, who must take time and money to expand their spell lists to a vast number of options, divine preparation spellcasters automatically have access to all their spells of their class. Without limiting how many they have access to at one time, the divine preparation classes gain a huge power boost with the spell-point system.

While increased flexibility is one of the features of this system, it is not designed to allow a 1st level cleric to choose from any of 65 different 1st level spells spread over multiple hardcover books.

Eldritch Dissonance

Channeling spell-points into the ritualistic formulas that make up spells isn’t as tidy or elegant a process as casting a prepared spell. The energy from spell-points tends to leave a residue in the aura of the spellcaster, creating a kind of mystic static or interference called “eldritch dissonance.” For preparation spellcasters – who are dependent on focusing raw magic energy into specific spells with a careful implementation of mental state, gesture, and incantations – even a small hindrance in their auras can make creating a spell effect significantly more difficult.

For preparation spell-point spellcasters, eldritch dissonance makes casting the same spell repeatedly increasingly difficult. This is because the dissonance is attuned specifically to the spell that created it, and the interference requires more spell energy to cut through and create the desired spell effect. As a result, each time after the first a preparation spell-point spellcaster casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs additional spell-points equal to its level.

For example, Davor is a half-orc spell-point wizard who knows fireball. As a 3rd level spell, the first time Davor casts fireball each day it costs 4 spell-points. If Davor decides to cast fireball again the next round, its cost increases to 7 spell-points (base 4, +3 for being a 3rd level spell). If he casts it a third time in another encounter later on the same day, it costs 10 (4 +3 +3) spell-points.

What’s The Deal With Eldritch Dissonance?

Eldritch dissonance exists for two compelling reasons. The first is to prevent magi, witches, and wizards from simply spending all their spell-points on their highest level spells, blowing away one or two encounters a day, and then refusing to do any more adventuring until they recover their spell-points. While a character with one of these classes could technically know enough spells to use all their highest-level options without incurring dissonance, this will be very rare (and represent a significant investment on the part of the spellcaster). In most cases, spellcasters will use a wide range of spells to prevent eldritch dissonance from making one favored option too expensive.

The second reason is one of game design favoring interesting options. If a spell-point spellcaster can use the same spell repeatedly without limit, many players will find one or two spells that are effective in a given encounter and cast them over and over. While this can make for good tactics, it’s not always good game design.

Having the same spell take effect repeatedly gets boring, not just for the spellcaster’s player but also for the GM and other players at the table.

It’s much more interesting to see a cleric look for creative ways to use control water (as a spell he can cast cheaply because he hasn’t used it yet that day) than for him to cast holy smite a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th time. Restrictions can encourage creativity, and this rule helps prevent the spell-point system from making the game less interesting for all involved.

When a spell-point spellcaster regains his use of daily abilities and takes an hour to refocus his mystic energies for the day, one of the things he does is cleanse his aura of any dissonance from the previous day. Thus, for spell-point spellcasters “preparation” refers not to preparing spells in advance (as the spell-point system makes that unnecessary), but in the careful preparations required to start with a clean aura each day.

For spontaneous spellcasters this residue has a much lesser effect – their spells known are an integral part of their personal auras, and no minor mystic clutter caused by their own spell energy is going to have any noticeable effect on their ability to continue casting spells. Each time after the first a spontaneous spell-point spellcaster casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point.

For example, Xasha is a 7th level bard with charm monster, and she’s trying to sneak into a minotaur encampment. As she meets a minotaur guard at the edge of camp, she hits him with charm monster, spending 4 spell-points. She convinces the monstrous humanoid to act as if she is his prisoner, and escort her into camp. When she has the minotaur take her into the chieftain’s tent she encounters one of his wives, and casts another charm monster, spending 5 spell-points. If the chieftain arrives before she can find the map she is looking for in his tent, she may need to cast another charm monster, which will cost her 6 spell-points.

Metamagic Feats

Spell-point spellcasters handle metamagic feats slightly differently than typical spellcasters.

In all cases, the spell-point spellcaster calculates the effective spell level of a spell + its metamagic feats, and calculates its spell-point cost based on that level. A spell is never considered lower than its base level when calculating its cost with metamagic feats, no matter what traits, feats, or abilities the spellcaster has that might lower its effective level with metamagic. Like standard spellcasters, spell-point spellcasters cannot use metamagic feats to boost a spell’s effective level to be higher than the highest-level spell the character can cast.

Since spell-point spellcasters all choose spells as they cast them, they can choose when they cast their spells whether to apply their metamagic feats to improve them. This takes more than casting a regular spell. If the spell’s normal casting time is a standard action, casting a metamagic version is a full-round action. (This isn’t the same as a 1-round casting time.) The only exception is for spells modified by the Quicken Spell metamagic feat, which can be cast as normal using the feat.

For a spell with a longer casting time, it takes an extra full-round action to cast the spell.

A metamagic version of a spell is still considered the same spell for purposes of eldritch dissonance. For spontaneous spell-point spellcasters this is easy to handle, since each additional casting of a spell simply costs 1 more spell-point. Thus in the example above, if Xasha has already cast normal charm person spells twice earlier in the same day, her still cast charm person is going to cost 2 more spell-points (5 total).

For preparation spell-point spellcasters it is slightly more complex. The additional cost of having cast a spell multiple times is always based on its original spell level. Thus, whenever adding one or more metamagic feats to a spell, the preparation spellcaster calculates what the spell’s cost would be without the metamagic feat, then adds 1 spell-point per level adjustment of the metamagic feat. Using metamagic feats multiple times in the same day does not increase the cost of adding the feat itself – only casting the same spell (regardless of metamagic) multiple times creates eldritch dissonance.

For example, Davor has cast fireball three times already in the day, but finds himself facing a group of bandits tightly clumped within a 20-foot radius. Unable to resist the targeting opportunity, but hoping he can take them all out in a single casting, Davor decides to use an empowered fireball, which counts as a 5th level spell. To determine the spell-point cost he calculates the cost of a 4th fireball in the same day (13) and adds two for the level adjustment of Empower Spell, for a total cost of 15 spell-points.

Recovering Spell Points

Each day, spell-point spellcasters must focus their minds on the task of regaining their spell-points. An arcane spell-point spellcaster needs 8 hours of rest. The spellcaster does not have to slumber for every minute of the time, but he must refrain from movement, combat, spellcasting, skill use, conversation, or any other fairly demanding physical or mental task during the rest period. If his rest is interrupted, each interruption adds 1 hour to the total amount of time he has to rest in order to clear his mind, and he must have at least 1 hour of uninterrupted rest immediately prior to regaining his spell-points. If the character does not need to sleep for some reason, he still must have 8 hours of restful calm before regaining any spell-points.

After resting, an arcane preparation spellcaster must have enough peace, quiet, and comfort to allow for proper concentration. The spellcaster’s surroundings need not be luxurious, but they must be free from distractions. Exposure to inclement weather prevents the necessary concentration, as does any injury or failed saving throw the character might experience while studying. After an hour of study, the preparation spellcaster regains spell-points used the day before, and resets all spell-point costs to their base cost (all eldritch dissonance is removed — see Eldritch Dissonance).

Characters who learn spells by adding them to a specific source (such as a wizard’s spellbook or a witch’s familiar ) must have access to that source to reset the cost of spells suffering eldritch dissonance. Without this source, these spells retain any eldritch dissonance gained from casting them previously.

An arcane spontaneous spell-point spellcaster needs only spends 15 minutes concentrating after resting. During this period, the spellcaster regains his spell-points, and the cost of all his spells returns to its base cost (all eldritch dissonance is removed -see Eldritch Dissonance). Without such a period to refresh herself, the character does not regain the spell-points used up the day before.

A divine spell-point spellcaster must meditate or pray for his spells. Each divine spell-point spellcaster must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his daily allotment of spell-points, reset his spell-point costs to their base level (ending any additional cost from eldritch dissonance), and attune to spells of his choice if he is a preparation spellcaster (see Divine Attunement, above). Time spent resting has no effect on whether a divine spell-point spellcaster can regain spell-points.

No spell-point spellcaster can regain spell-points more than once per day.

Recent Casting Limit

All spell-point spellcasters are unable to regain any spell-points spent within the 8 hours prior to regaining spell-points for the day.

The Spell-Point Spellcasting Classes

The following rules describe how the spell-point versions of each of the base spellcasting classes operate. Except where specifically noted otherwise, these classes follow the general rules on spellcasting, the general rules for their class, and the general rules of spell-point spellcasting outlined above. Any ability or class feature of these classes that is not mentioned in the entries below works exactly as described for standard members of the class.

Renaming Spell-Point Spellcasters

In a game where only spell-point spellcasters are used, it’s easiest to simply leave the class names alone – a spell-point bard is just called a bard. However, if a GM decides to add spell-point spellcasting options into a campaign that also retains standard spellcasters, it may be preferable to use different names for the spell-point versions of the class, allowing players to quickly distinguish between a bard and a jongleur (or whatever term is selected). Some suggestions for alternate names are given below. While not all these names are a perfect match for the abilities of each class, they can be used to add specific flavor to the terminology of a campaign.

  • Alchemist: Hermetic, Natural Philosopher, Occamist
  • Bard: Harper, Jongleur, Minstrel
  • Cleric: Curate, Ecclesiastic, Pastor
  • Druid: Jhankri, Ovate, Witch Doctor
  • Inquisitor: Bailiff, Exorcist, Medean
  • Magus: Caliburn, Dvergmal, Meigas
  • Oracle: Auspex, Astrologer, Soothsayer
  • Paladin: Champion, Peer, Saint
  • Ranger: Custodian, Huntsman, Sentinel
  • Summoner: Balain, Diabolist, Inua
  • Sorcerer: Noita, Glamorist, Will-Worker
  • Wizard: Obeah, Thaumaturge, Wren
  • Witch: Dalang, Houngan/Mambo, Medicine Man

Tracking Spell Points

While players and GMs are all used to tracking spell slots, prepared spells, hit points, ammunition, and similar expendable resources, tracking spell-points can feel more complex when it is first introduced to a campaign. The most important factor is to keep track of each pool of spell-points separately – having a character’s open pool and reserve pool listed separately makes it easy to know when the character must begin making saving throws to avoid fatigue and listing special pools (such as domain pools and specialty school pools) separately makes it easier to know what spell-points can be used to cast what kind of spells.

Similarly, wherever the player normally tracks spells known is a good place to mark down how many times in a day a character has cast a specific spell. This makes it easy to track the additional spell-point cost of a spell due to eldritch dissonance.

Alchemist Spell-Point Extracts

Although alchemists are not strictly speaking spellcasters, their alchemical extracts in many ways behave like spells in potion form, and thus can be used with a spell-point system. For purposes of various spell-point rules, alchemists are treated as arcane preparation spellcasters.

An alchemist can create only a certain number of extracts of each level per day, determined by his extract points. Extract points work just like spell-points for a prepared arcane spellcaster, except that they are used to imbue alchemical liquids with magic power rather than to cast spells. The alchemist’s base daily allotment of extract points is given on the Table: Alchemist Extract Points per Day. In addition, he receives bonus extracts points per day if he has a high Intelligence score, in the same way a wizard receives bonus spells points.

When an alchemist mixes an extract, he infuses the chemicals and reagents in the extract with magic siphoned from his own magical aura to form a potion-like extract. Unlike potions, though, extracts can have powerful effects and duplicate spells that a potion normally could not. Additionally, their effects can be dispelled by effects like dispel magic using the alchemist’s level as the caster level.

Infusing an extract requires an expenditure of extract points equal to 1+the extract’s level. An extract immediately becomes inert if it leaves the alchemist’s possession, reactivating as soon as it returns to his keeping—an alchemist cannot normally pass out his extracts for allies to use (but see the “infusion, spell-point version” discovery below). An extract, once created, remains potent for 1 day before becoming inert, so an alchemist must re-prepare his extracts every day.

Mixing the reagents required to form an extract takes 1 minute of work—most alchemists prepare many reagents at the start of the day or just before going on an adventure. Once the reagents have been mixed, an alchemist can imbue them with the magic taken from his aura in the same time it could take to cast the spell the extract is based on. If the alchemist wishes to, he may also drink the extract as part of this action, gaining its benefits. Because extracts are imbued with magic directly from the alchemist’s aura, they are subject to the same eldritch dissonance as a preparation spellcaster.

Although the alchemist doesn’t actually cast spells, he does have a formulae list that determines what extracts he can create. An alchemist can utilize spell-trigger items if the spell appears on his formulae list, but not spell-completion items (unless he uses Use Magic Device to do so). An extract is “cast” by drinking it, as if imbibing a potion—the effects of an extract exactly duplicate the spell upon which its formula is based, save that the spell always affects only the drinking alchemist. The alchemist uses his level as the caster level to determine any effect based on caster level. Creating extracts consumes raw materials, but the cost of these materials is insignificant— comparable to the valueless material components of most spells. If a spell normally has a costly material component, that component is expended during the consumption of that particular extract.

Extracts cannot be made from spells that have focus requirements (alchemist extracts that duplicate divine spells never have a divine focus requirement). An alchemist can prepare an extract of any formula he knows.

To learn or use an extract, an alchemist must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the extract’s level. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against an alchemist’s extract is 10 + the extract level + the alchemist’s Intelligence modifier.

An alchemist may know any number of formulae.

He stores his formulae in a special tome called a formula book. He must refer to this book whenever he prepares the reagents required to create an extract, but not when he imbues it with magic from his aura or consumes it. An alchemist begins play with two 1st-level formulae of his choice, plus a number of additional forumlae equal to his Intelligence modifier. At each new alchemist level, he gains one new formula of any level that he can create. An alchemist can also add formulae to his book just like a wizard adds spells to his spellbook, using the same costs and time requirements.

An alchemist can study a wizard’s spellbook to learn any formula that is equivalent to a spell the spellbook contains. A wizard, however, cannot learn spells from a formula book. An alchemist does not need to decipher arcane writings before copying them.

Infusion

Benefit(s): When the alchemist creates an extract, he can infuse it with an extra bit of his own magical power. The extract created now persists even after the alchemist sets it down. As long as the extract exists, the spell-points used to create it cannot be recovered by the alchemist. An infused extract can be imbibed by a non-alchemist to gain its effects.

Alchemist Extract Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Extract Level
1 2 1
2 4 1
3 6 1
4 8 2
5 11 2
6 14 2
7 17 3
8 22 3
9 27 3
10 32 4
11 38 4
12 44 4
13 50 5
14 58 5
15 64 5
16 72 6
17 80 6
18 89 6
19 98 6
20 108 6

Bard Spell-Point Spellcasting

A bard is a spontaneous spellcaster that casts arcane spells drawn from the bard spell list. She can cast any spell she knows as long as she has spell points to do so. Every bard spell has a verbal component (singing, reciting, or music). To learn or cast a spell, a bard must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A bard gains bonus spell points equal to her Charisma bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell she knows). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a bard’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the bard’s Charisma modifier. A bard has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell she knows, a bard must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a bard must expend 2 points from her spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the bard to expend 4 points from her spell pool.

Each time the bard casts a spell it leaves some small traces on her magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a bard’s aura is generally too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the bard to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process.

Because a bard’s spells are internalized to her aura (they are innate magic powers gained through the bard’s artistic nature), only a little eldritch dissonance is created by each spellcasting. As a result, each time a bard casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point. This additional spell-point cost is removed when the bard refocuses herself and regains her spell-points for the day.

The bard’s selection of spells is extremely limited. A bard begins play knowing four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of the bard’s choice.

At each new bard level, she gains one or more new spells (as indicated on the table Bard Spells Known in the core rules). Unlike spell-points, the number of spells a bard knows is not affected by her Charisma score.

Upon reaching 5th level, and at every third bard level after that (8th, 11th, and so on), a bard can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the bard “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least one level lower than the highest-level bard spell the bard can cast.

A bard may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.

Cantrips: A bard knows a number of cantrips, or 0-level spells, as determined on Table: Bard Spells Known. As long as the bard has 1 spell-point available, she may cast her cantrips freely. They do not have a spell-point cost, and do not suffer from eldritch dissonance. If a bard has no spell-points left, she cannot cast cantrips.

Bard Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points
1 3
2 5
3 7
4 10
5 13
6 16
7 20
8 24
9 29
10 35
11 42
12 50
13 59
14 69
15 80
16 92
17 105
18 119
19 134
20 150
Cleric Spell-Point Spellcasting
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1 5 1
2 8 1
3 11 2
4 14 2
5 17 3
6 21 3
7 26 4
8 34 4
9 42 5
10 51 5
11 61 6
12 72 6
13 84 7
14 97 7
15 111 8
16 116 8
17 132 9
18 149 9
19 167 9
20 186 9

A cleric is a preparation spellcaster that casts divine spells drawn from the cleric/oracle spell list. His alignment, however, may restrict him from casting certain spells opposed to his moral or ethical beliefs; see Chaotic, Evil, Good, and Lawful Spells in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook. A cleric may cast any spell he is attuned to (see Divine Attunement on page 5 above), as long as he has the spell points to do so.

To attune to or cast a spell, a cleric must have a Wisdom score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

A cleric gains bonus spell points equal to his Wisdom bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a cleric’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the cleric’s Wisdom modifier. A cleric has a limited number of spell points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he is attuned to, a cleric must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a cleric must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 5th level spell requires the cleric to expend 6 points from his spell pool.

Because a cleric’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are sacred powers cast through divine inspiration, unlike an oracle’s innate magic powers), each time the cleric casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a cleric’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the cleric to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a cleric casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level. (Though see Spontaneous Casting.) This additional spell-point cost is removed when the cleric refills his spell-points and attunes his spells for the day.

Clerics meditate or pray for their spells. Each cleric must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his daily allotment of spell-points, attune to spells of his choice (see Divine Attunement), and reset his spell-point costs to their base level (ending any additional cost from eldritch dissonance). Time spent resting has no effect on whether a cleric can prepare spells. A cleric may attune to any spell on the cleric spell list he meets the qualifications to cast, but he must choose which spells to attune during his daily meditation.

Orisons: A cleric can prepare a number of orisons, or 0-level spells. Each orison he prepares reduces the number of spell-points in his spell pool by 1 until he next attunes spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the cleric to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Orisons do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

A cleric’s deity influences her alignment, what magic he can perform, his values, and how others see him. A cleric chooses two domains from among those belonging to his deity. A cleric can select an alignment domain (Chaos, Evil, Good, or Law) only if his alignment matches that domain. If a cleric is not devoted to a particular deity, he still selects two domains to represent his spiritual inclinations and abilities (subject to GM approval). The restriction on alignment domains still applies.

Each domain grants a number of domain powers, dependent upon the level of the cleric, as well as a number of bonus spells added to the cleric’s spell list. The cleric is always considered attuned to the spells from his domains. In addition, the cleric receives an additional pool of spell-points – the domain pool – with spell-points equal to his cleric level. These points do not count towards the cleric’s open or reserve pool of spell-points, and expending them does not force the cleric to save against fatigue (see Fatigue and Exhaustion above). The spell-points in the domain pool can only be used to cast spells from the cleric’s domain. A cleric may combine spell-points from his domain pool with spell-points from other sources to pay the cost of casting a spell from his domain.

In addition, a cleric gains the listed powers from both of his domains, if he is of a high enough level. Unless otherwise noted, activating a domain power is a standard action.

Spontaneous Casting

A good cleric (or a neutral cleric of a good deity) can channel spell-points into healing spells without creating eldritch dissonance. A cleric is always considered attuned to cure spells, and when the cleric casts any cure spell, the spell-point cost of the spell does not increase. (A cure spell is any spell with “cure” in its name).

An evil cleric (or a neutral cleric of an evil deity) is not automatically attuned to cure spells and can’t cast cure spells without their spell-point cost increasing, but is attuned to and can cast inflict spells (an inflict spell is one with “inflict” in its name) without their spell-point cost increasing.

A cleric who is neither good nor evil and whose deity is neither good nor evil is either automatically attuned to cure spells or inflict spells (player’s choice), and can cast such spells without affecting their spell-point cost. Once the player makes this choice, it cannot be reversed.

This choice also determines whether the cleric channels positive or negative energy (see channel energy in the cleric entry of the core rules).

Altered Cleric Spells

The following spell works differently when cast by a spell-point cleric or oracle.

Imbue with Spell Ability

School evocation; Level cleric/oracle 4; Domain community 4, magic 4

CASTING

Casting Time 10 minutes
Components V, S, DF

EFFECT

Range touch
Target creature touched; see text
Duration permanent until discharged (D)
Saving Throw Will negates (harmless); Spell Resistance yes (harmless)

DESCRIPTION

You transfer some of your spell energy to another creature, in the form of one or more spells the target can cast. Only a creature with an Intelligence score of at least 5 and a Wisdom score of at least 9 can receive this boon. Only attuned cleric spells from the schools of abjuration, divination, and conjuration (healing) can be transferred. The number and level of spells that the subject can be granted depends on its Hit Dice; even multiple castings of imbue with spell ability can’t exceed this limit. You must pay the spell-point cost of both imbue with spell ability, and each casting of any spell granted by this boon.

HD of Recipient Spells Imbued
2 or lower One 1st-level spell
3-4 One or two 1st-level spells
5 or higher One or two 1st-level spells and one 2nd-level spell

The transferred spell’s variable characteristics (range, duration, area, and the like) function according to your level, not the level of the recipient.

To cast a spell with a verbal component, the subject must be able to speak. To cast a spell with a somatic component, it must be able to move freely. To cast a spell with a material component or focus, it must have the materials or focus.

Druid Spell-Point Spellcasting

A druid is a preparation spellcaster that casts divine spells drawn from the druid spell list. His alignment, however, may restrict him from casting certain spells opposed to his moral or ethical beliefs; see Chaotic, Evil, Good, and Lawful Spells in the core rules.

A druid may cast any spell he is attuned to (see Divine Attunement), as long as he has the spell-points to do so. To attune to or cast a spell, a druid must have a Wisdom score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A druid gains bonus spell-points equal to his Wisdom bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a druid’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the druid’s Wisdom modifier.

A druid has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he is attuned to, a druid must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a druid must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 5th level spell requires the druid to expend 6 points from his spell pool.

Druid Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1 5 1
2 8 1
3 11 2
4 14 2
5 17 3
6 21 3
7 26 4
8 34 4
9 42 5
10 51 5
11 61 6
12 72 6
13 84 7
14 97 7
15 111 8
16 116 8
17 132 9
18 149 9
19 167 9
20 186 9

Because a druid’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are sacred powers cast through divine inspiration, unlike an oracle’s innate magic powers), each time the druid casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a druid’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the druid to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a druid casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level. (Though see Spontaneous Casting, below.) This additional spell-point cost is removed when the druid refills his spell-points and attunes his spells for the day.

A druid must spend 1 hour each day in a trancelike meditation on the mysteries of nature to regain his daily allotment of spell-points. Each druid must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his daily allotment of spell-points, attune to spells of his choice (see Divine Attunement), and reset his spell-point costs to their base level (ending any additional cost from eldritch dissonance). Time spent resting has no effect on whether a druid can prepare spells. A druid may attune to any spell on the druid spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to attune during his daily meditation.

Orisons: A druid can prepare a number of orisons, or 0-level spells. Each orison he prepares reduces the number of spell-points in his spell pool by 1 until he next attunes spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the druid to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Orisons do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

Spontaneous Casting

A druid can channel spell-points into summoning spells without creating eldritch dissonance. The druid is automatically considered attuned to all “summon nature’s ally” spells, and when the druid casts such spells, the spell-point cost of the spell does not increase.

Inquisitor Spell-Point Spellcasting

An inquisitor is a spontaneous spellcaster that casts divine spells drawn from the inquisitor spell list. She can cast any spell she knows as long as she has spell-points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, an inquisitor must have a Wisdom score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. An inquisitor gains bonus spell-points equal to her Wisdom bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell she knows). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against an inquisitor’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the inquisitor’s Wisdom modifier. An inquisitor has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell she knows, an inquisitor must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell an inquisitor must expend 2 points from her spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the inquisitor to expend 4 points from her spell pool.

Each time the inquisitor casts a spell it leaves some small traces on her magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on an inquisitor’s aura is generally too faint to actually set off detect magic). This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the inquisitor to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. Because an inquisitor’s spells are internalized to her aura (they are innate magic powers gained through the inquisitor’s devotion to the principles of a deity), only a little eldritch dissonance is created by each spellcasting. As a result, each time an inquisitor casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point. This additional spell-point cost is removed when the inquisitor refocuses herself and regains her spell-points for the day.

The inquisitor’s selection of spells is extremely limited. An inquisitor begins play knowing four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of the inquisitor’s choice. At each new inquisitor level, she gains one or more new spells (as indicated on Table: Inquisitor Spells Known). Unlike spell-points, the number of spells an inquisitor knows is not affected by her Charisma score.

Upon reaching 5th level, and at every third inquisitor level after that (8th, 11th, and so on), an inquisitor can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the inquisitor “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one.

The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least one level lower than the highest-level inquisitor spell the inquisitor can cast. An inquisitor may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.

Orisons: An inquisitor knows a number of orisons, or 0-level spells, as determined on Table: Inquisitor Spells Known.As long as the inquisitor has 1 spell-point available, she may cast her orisons freely. They do not have a spell-point cost, and do not suffer from eldritch dissonance. If an inquisitor has no spell-points left, she cannot cast orisons.

Domains: An inquisitor receives one domain.

An inquisitor’s domain does not grant her any bonus spells known or additional spell-points.

Magus Spell-Point Spellcasting

A magus is a preparation spellcaster that casts arcane spells drawn from the magus spell list. A magus may cast any spell he knows, as long as he has the spell-points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, a magus must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A magus gains bonus spell-points equal to his Intelligence bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a magus’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the magus’s Intelligence modifier. A magus has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he knows, a magus must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a magus must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 5th level spell requires the magus to expend 6 points from his spell pool.

Because a magus’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are learned knacks cast through arcane lore, unlike a sorcerer’s innate magic powers), each time the magus casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a magus’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the magus to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a magus casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level.

This additional spell-point cost is removed when the magus refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day. A magus may know any number of spells, learning them by adding them to his spellbook. If a magus does not have his spellbook when he refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day, any additional spell-point cost that has accrued as a result of eldritch dissonance is retained.

Inquisitor Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points
1 3
2 5
3 7
4 10
5 13
6 16
7 20
8 24
9 29
10 35
11 42
12 50
13 59
14 69
15 80
16 92
17 105
18 119
19 134
20 150
Magus Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1 6 1
2 9 1
3 11 1
4 14 2
5 17 2
6 21 2
7 25 3
8 29 3
9 34 3
10 40 4
11 47 4
12 55 4
13 64 5
14 74 5
15 85 5
16 97 6
17 110 6
18 114 6
19 139 6
20 155 6

Cantrips: A magus can prepare a number of cantrips, or 0-level spells. Each cantrip he prepares reduces the number of spell-points in his spell pool by 1 until the magus next prepares spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the magus to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Cantrips do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

Metamagic Arcana: When using the spell combat class feature, a spell-point magus may spend one arcana point to apply a metamagic feat to a spell with a casting time of one standard action without changing its casting time.

Spell Recall (Su): At 4th level, the magus learns to use his arcane pool to remove eldritch dissonance attached to spells he has already cast. With a swift action he can reset the spell-point cost of any single magus spell that he has cast that day to its base cost (removing any additional spell-point cost generated by eldritch dissonance, see Eldritch Dissonance) by expending a single point from his arcane pool.

Knowledge Pool (Su): At 7th level, when a magus regains his spell-points and prepares his magus spells, he can decide to expend 1 or more points from his arcane pool, up to his Intelligence bonus. For each point he expends, he can treat any one spell from the magus spell list as if it were in his spellbook and can spend spell-points to cast that spell as normal that day. He retains this ability until he next regains his spell-points and prepares his magus spells.

Improved Spell Recall (Su): At 11th level, the magus’s ability to recall spells using his arcane pool becomes more efficient. Whenever he spends a point from his arcane pool to reset the cost of a spell with the spell recall ability, he rests the cost of all spells of the same level.

Oracle Spell-Point Spellcasting

An oracle is a spontaneous spellcaster that casts divine spells drawn from the cleric/oracle spell list. She can cast any spell she knows as long as she has spell-points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, an oracle must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. An oracle gains bonus spell-points equal to her Charisma bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell she knows). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against an oracle’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the oracle’s Charisma modifier. An oracle has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell she knows, an oracle must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell an oracle must expend 2 points from her spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the oracle to expend 4 points from her spell pool.

Each time the oracle casts a spell it leaves some small traces on her magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on an oracle’s aura is generally too faint to actually set off detect magic). This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the oracle to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. Because an oracle’s spells are internalized to her aura (they are innate magic powers granted by divine forces who have selected the oracle to serve as an agent and harbinger ), only a little eldritch dissonance is created by each spellcasting. As a result, each time an oracle casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point.

This additional spell-point cost is removed when the oracle refocuses herself and regains her spell-points for the day.

The oracle’s selection of spells is extremely limited. An oracle begins play knowing four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of the oracle’s choice.

At each new oracle level, she gains one or more new spells (as indicated on Table: Oracle Spells Known). Unlike spell-points, the number of spells an oracle knows is not affected by her Charisma score.

In addition to the spells gained by oracles as they gain levels, each oracle also adds all of either the cure spells or the inflict spells to her list of spells known (cure spells include all spells with “cure” in the name, inflict spells include all spells with “inflict” in the name). These spells are added as soon as the oracle is capable of casting them. This choice is made when the oracle gains her first level and cannot be changed.

Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even-numbered oracle level after that (6th, 8th, and so on), an oracle can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the oracle loses the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged. An oracle may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.

Oracle Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points
1 6
2 9
3 11
4 14
5 20
6 30
7 40
8 50
9 63
10 75
11 90
12 105
13 120
14 140
15 165
16 170
17 195
18 225
19 240
20 260

An oracle knows a number of orisons, or 0-level spells, as determined on Table: Oracle Spells Known. As long as the oracle has 1 spell-point available, she may cast her orisons freely.

They do not have a spell-point cost, and do not suffer from eldritch dissonance. If an oracle has no spell-points left, she cannot cast orisons.

Paladin Spell-Point Spellcasting

Beginning at 4th level a paladin becomes a preparation spellcaster that gains the ability to cast a small number of divine spells drawn from the paladin spell list. A paladin may cast any spell he is attuned to (see Divine Attunement), as long as he has the spell-points to do so.

To attune to or cast a spell, a paladin must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A paladin gains bonus spell-points equal to his Charisma bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a paladin’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the paladin’s Charisma modifier. A paladin has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he is attuned to, a paladin must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a paladin must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the paladin to expend 4 points from his spell pool.

Because a paladin’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are sacred powers cast through divine inspiration, unlike an oracle’s innate magic powers), each time the paladin casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a paladin’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the paladin to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a paladin casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level.

This additional spell-point cost is removed when the paladin refills his spell-points and attunes his spells for the day.

A paladin must spend 1 hour each day in a quiet prayer and meditation to regain his daily allotment of spell-points. Each paladin must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his daily allotment of spell-points, attune to spells of his choice (see Divine Attunement), and reset his spell-point costs to their base level (ending any additional cost from eldritch dissonance). Time spent resting has no effect on whether a paladin can prepare spells. A paladin may attune to any spell on the paladin spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to attune during his daily meditation.

Through 3rd level a paladin has no caster level.

At 4th level and higher, a paladin’s caster level is equal to his paladin level -3.

Paladin Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1-3
4 1 1
5 2 1
6 3 1
7 4 2
8 5 2
9 6 2
10 8 3
11 10 3
12 12 3
13 14 4
14 17 4
15 20 4
16 23 4
17 26 4
18 29 4
19 32 4
20 35 4

Ranger Spell-Point Spellcasting

Beginning at 4th level a ranger becomes a preparation spellcaster that gains the ability to cast a small number of divine spells drawn from the ranger spell list. A ranger may cast any spell he is attuned to (see Divine Attunement), as long as he has the spell-points to do so.

To attune to or cast a spell, a ranger must have a Wisdom score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A ranger gains bonus spell-points equal to his Wisdom bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a ranger’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the ranger’s Wisdom modifier. A ranger has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he is attuned to, a ranger must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a ranger must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the ranger to expend 4 points from his spell pool.

Because a ranger’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are sacred powers cast through divine inspiration, unlike an oracle’s innate magic powers), each time the ranger casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a ranger’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the ranger to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a ranger casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level.

This additional spell-point cost is removed when the ranger refills his spell-points and attunes his spells for the day.

A ranger must spend 1 hour each day in a quiet meditation to regain his daily allotment of spell-points. Each ranger must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation to regain his daily allotment of spell-points, attune to spells of his choice (see Divine Attunement), and reset his spell-point costs to their base level (ending any additional cost from eldritch dissonance). Time spent resting has no effect on whether a ranger can prepare spells. A ranger may attune to any spell on the ranger spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to attune during his daily meditation.

Through 3rd level a ranger has no caster level.

At 4th level and higher, a ranger’s caster level is equal to his ranger level -3.

Ranger Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1-3
4 1 1
5 2 1
6 3 1
7 4 2
8 5 2
9 6 2
10 8 3
11 10 3
12 12 3
13 14 4
14 17 4
15 20 4
16 23 4
17 26 4
18 29 4
19 32 4
20 35 4

Sorcerer Spell-Point Spellcasting

A sorcerer is a spontaneous spellcaster that casts arcane spells drawn from the sorcerer/ wizard spell list. She can cast any spell she knows as long as she has spell-points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, a sorcerer must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A sorcerer gains bonus spell-points equal to her Charisma bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell she knows). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a sorcerer’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the sorcerer’s Charisma modifier. A sorcerer has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell she knows, a sorcerer must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a sorcerer must expend 2 points from her spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the sorcerer to expend 4 points from her spell pool.

Each time the sorcerer casts a spell it leaves some small traces on her magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a sorcerer’s aura is generally too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the sorcerer to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. Because a sorcerer’s spells are internalized to her aura (they are innate magic powers gained through the sorcerer’s artistic nature), only a little eldritch dissonance is created by each spellcasting.

As a result, each time a sorcerer casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point. This additional spell-point cost is removed when the sorcerer refocuses herself and regains her spell-points for the day.

The sorcerer’s selection of spells is extremely limited. A sorcerer begins play knowing four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of the sorcerer’s choice. At each new sorcerer level, she gains one or more new spells (as indicated on Table: Sorcerer Spells Known. Unlike spell-points, the number of spells a sorcerer knows is not affected by her Charisma score.

Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even-numbered sorcerer level after that (6th, 8th, and so on), a sorcerer can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the sorcerer loses the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged. A sorcerer may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.

Cantrips: A sorcerer knows a number cantrips, or 0-level spells, as determined on the table Sorcerer Spells Known in the core rules. As long as the sorcerer has 1 spell-point available, she may cast her cantrips freely. They do not have a spell-point cost, and do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

If a sorcerer has no spell-points left, she cannot cast cantrips.

Sorcerer Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points
1 6
2 9
3 11
4 14
5 20
6 30
7 40
8 50
9 63
10 75
11 90
12 105
13 120
14 140
15 165
16 170
17 195
18 225
19 240
20 260

Summoner Spell-Point Spellcasting

A summoner is a spontaneous spellcaster that casts arcane spells drawn from the summoner spell list. She can cast any spell she knows as long as she has spell-points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, a summoner must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A summoner gains bonus spell-points equal to her Charisma bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell she knows). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a summoner’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the summoner’s Charisma modifier. A summoner has a limited number of spell-points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell she knows, a summoner must expend a number of spell-points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a summoner must expend 2 points from her spell pool, and casting a 3rd level spell requires the summoner to expend 4 points from her spell pool.

Each time the summoner casts a spell it leaves some small traces on her magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a summoner’s aura is generally too faint to actually set off detect magic). This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the summoner to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. Because a summoner’s spells are internalized to her aura (they are innate magic powers gained through the summoner’s artistic nature), only a little eldritch dissonance is created by each spellcasting. As a result, each time a summoner casts the same spell since restoring her spell pool, it costs one additional spell-point. This additional spell-point cost is removed when the summoner refocuses herself and regains her spell-points for the day.

The summoner’s selection of spells is extremely limited. A summoner begins play knowing four 0-level spells and two 1st-level spells of the summoner’s choice. At each new summoner level, she gains one or more new spells (as indicated on Table: Summoner Spells Known. Unlike spell-points, the number of spells a summoner knows is not affected by her Charisma score.

Upon reaching 5th level, and at every third summoner level after that (8th, 11th, and so on), a summoner can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the summoner “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one.

The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least one level lower than the highest-level summoner spell the summoner can cast. A summoner may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level.

Cantrips: A summoner knows a number cantrips, or 0-level spells, as determined on the table Summoner Spells Known in the Advanced Player’s Guide. As long as the summoner has 1 spell-point available, she may cast her cantrips freely.

They do not have a spell-point cost, and do not suffer from eldritch dissonance. If a summoner has no spell-points left, she cannot cast cantrips.

Summoner Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points
1 3
2 5
3 7
4 10
5 13
6 16
7 20
8 24
9 29
10 35
11 42
12 50
13 59
14 69
15 80
16 92
17 105
18 119
19 134
20 150

Witch Spell-Point Spellcasting

A witch is a preparation spellcaster that casts arcane spells drawn from the witch spell list. A witch may cast any spell he knows, as long as he has the spell points to do so. To learn or cast a spell, a witch must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. A witch gains bonus spell points equal to his Intelligence bonus (to a maximum of the highest level spell he can cast). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a witch’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the witch’s Intelligence modifier. A witch has a limited number of spell points in a spell pool. To cast a 1st level or higher spell he knows, a witch must expend a number of spell points equal to the spell’s level +1. Thus, to cast a 1st level spell a witch must expend 2 points from his spell pool, and casting a 5th level spell requires the witch to expend 6 points from his spell pool.

Witch Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1 5 1
2 8 1
3 11 2
4 14 2
5 17 3
6 21 3
7 26 4
8 34 4
9 42 5
10 51 5
11 61 6
12 72 6
13 84 7
14 97 7
15 111 8
16 116 8
17 132 9
18 149 9
19 167 9
20 186 9

Because a witch’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are learned knacks cast through communion with the unknown, unlike a sorcerer’s innate magic powers), each time the witch casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a witch’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic). This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the witch to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a witch casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level. This additional spell-point cost is removed when the witch refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day.

A witch may know any number of spells, learning them by adding them to his familiar. If a witch does not have his familiar when he refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day, any additional spell-point cost that has accrued as a result of eldritch dissonance is retained.

Cantrips: A witch can prepare a number of cantrips, or 0-level spells. Each cantrip he prepares reduces the number of spell-points in his spell pool by 1 until the witch next prepares spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the witch to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Cantrips do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

Wizard Spell-Point Spellcasting

Because a wizard’s spells are not internalized to his aura (they are learned knacks cast through arcane lore, unlike a sorcerer’s innate magic powers), each time the wizard casts a spell it leaves some traces on his magic aura (much like the lingering auras that can be revealed with a detect magic spell, though the residue on a wizard’s aura is often too faint to actually set off detect magic).

This residue, known as eldritch dissonance, makes it difficult for the wizard to cast the same spell multiple times in the same day, as some traces of its previous mystic pattern interfere with the casting process. As a result, each time a wizard casts the same spell since restoring his spell pool, it costs a number of additional spell-points equal to its level.

This additional spell-point cost is removed when the wizard refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day.

A wizard may know any number of spells, learning them by adding them to his spellbook. If a wizard does not have his spellbook when he refills his spell-points and prepares his spells for the day, any additional spell-point cost that has accrued as a result of eldritch dissonance is retained.

Wizard Spell Points Per Level
Level Spell Points Max Spell Level
1 5 1
2 8 1
3 11 2
4 14 2
5 17 3
6 21 3
7 26 4
8 34 4
9 42 5
10 51 5
11 61 6
12 72 6
13 84 7
14 97 7
15 111 8
16 116 8
17 132 9
18 149 9
19 167 9
20 186 9

Cantrips: A wizard can prepare a number of cantrips, or 0-level spells. Each cantrip he prepares reduces the number of spell-points in his spell pool by 1 until the wizard next prepares spells. These spells are cast like any other spells, but once prepared they do not require the wizard to expend any points from his spell pool to cast them. Cantrips do not suffer from eldritch dissonance.

Arcane School

A wizard can choose to specialize in one school of magic or an elementalist school, gaining additional spell-points and powers based on that school. This choice must be made at 1st level, and once made, it cannot be changed. A wizard that does not select a school receives the universalist school instead.

A wizard that chooses to specialize in one school of magic must select two other schools as his opposition schools, representing knowledge sacrificed in one area of arcane lore to gain mastery in another. (A wizard specializing in an elemental school automatically takes the opposed elemental school as his opposed school.) Spells from a wizard’s opposition schools have double the normal base spell-point cost. For example, a wizard with evocation as an opposition school must expend eight spell-points to cast a fireball. Eldritch dissonance then increases the cost of a spell from an opposed school normally (for example the second time the wizard with evocation as an opposed school casts fireball, the cost is 11 spell-points). In addition, a specialist takes a –4 penalty on any skill checks made when crafting a magic item that has a spell from one of his opposition schools as a prerequisite. A universalist wizard can prepare spells from any school without restriction.

Each arcane school gives the wizard a number of school powers. In addition, specialist wizards receive an additional pool of spell points – the specialist pool – with spell points equal to his wizard level. These points do not count towards the wizard’s open or reserve pool of spell points, and expending them does not force the wizard to save against fatigue (see Fatigue and Exhaustion). The spell points in the specialist pool can only be used to cast spells from the wizard’s specialized school of magic. A wizard may combine spell-points from his specialist pool with spell-points form other sources to pay the cost of casting a spell from his specialized school. Wizards with the universalist school do not receive a specialist pool.

Bonded Item

A wizard that takes a bonded item as an arcane bond gains an additional pool of spell-points – the bonded item pool – with spell-points equal to 1 + the level of the highest-level wizard spell he can cast. These points do not count towards the wizard’s open or serve pool of spell-points, and expending them does not force the wizard to save against fatigue (see Fatigue and Exhaustion). The spell-points in the bonded item pool can be used to cast any spell the wizard knows, but the entire spell-point cost must be met by points within the bonded item pool. The wizard cannot combine spell-points from his bonded item pool with spell-points form other sources to pay the cost of casting a spell.

Altered Wizard Spells

The following spell works differently when cast by a spell-point wizard.

Mnemonic Enhancer

School: transmutation; Level: wizard 4

CASTING

Casting Time: 10 minutes
Components: V, S, M (a piece of string, and ink consisting of squid secretion mixed with black dragon’s blood), F (an ivory plaque worth 50 gp)

EFFECT

Range: personal
Target: you
Duration: instantaneous

DESCRIPTION

Casting this spell allows you to cleanse your aura of the residue of 1st-3rd level spells you have cast since you last regained your spell-points, removing eldritch dissonance. The spell-point cost of all spells of 3rd level and lower resets to its base cost, as if you have not cast any of these spells yet today.

Other Classes With Spell-Points

While most of the spellcasting base classes common to the game were given full spell-point rules above, those rules do not cover every possible archetypes, multiclass characters, and prestige classes. Each of these can be handled with a set of general rules, presented below.

Archetypes With Diminished Spellcasting

A few archetypes specifically limit the spellcasting ability of the class they are added to, reducing the class’s spellcasting ability by removing one spell slot per spell level. The cleric’s cloistered cleric archetype, magus’s kensai and skirnir archetypes, and the oracle’s purifier archetype all have the diminished spellcasting feature, and other archetypes may use it as well.

Obviously when determining the spell-points/ day of a character using such an archetype this needs to be taken into account.

If a character has an archetype with the diminished spellcasting feature, reduce its spell-points by an amount equal to the spell-points required to cast each spell level above 0-level it has access to once. For example, a 7th level magus with the skirnir archetype can cast 1st, 2nd, and 3rd levels spells. To cast one spell of each of these levels takes (2+3+4) 9 spell-points. Thus a 7th level skirnir receives 16 spell-points, rather than the normal 25 for a magus of that level.

The character does not have its maximum spell level reduced, even though a character with the archetype using traditional spellcasting rules might end up with “0” spells per day of a given spell level. The reduction in spell-points is limiting enough without also trying to figure out of the class should delay acquisition of higher spell levels.

Other Base Classes

Any GM using this spell-point system is obviously open to using material from other publishers, making it at least possible the GM’s campaign will include classes from other publishers. Since it’s not possible to include spell-points charts for every conceivable base spellcasting class, this leaves such GMs without a baseline for how many spell-points such characters should receive at each level. To assist with such cases, here are rules for determining spell-points for any class with spellcasting ability.

First, if the class has exactly the same spellcasting ability as an existing base class, simply give it the same spell-points per level as that class. For example, the time warden has exactly the same spells per day and spells known as a bard. That makes it easy to just give time wardens the same number of spell-points per level as bards.

For classes with unique spellcasting abilities that don’t match any existing base class, things get trickier. A GM can simply pick the closest equivalent base class and use its spell-points per level. Obviously the result won’t be exactly the same, but in most cases it’ll be close enough.

Alternatively, the GM can craft a custom spell-points per level chart for each new base class that has a unique spellcasting progression. The problem with this is that there isn’t a single formula that was universally applied to create the existing spell-point per level values. A formula was originally applied, but extensive playtesting revealed that some classes were slightly too powerful at some levels, and others were too weak. To fix this adjustments in spell-points received were made at specific levels, and the overall progression smoothed out as much as possible without creating new power imbalances. As a result, a GM going this route is going to have to be willing to make some adjustments to any chart he creates if it proves to be too unbalanced in actual play. It’s certainly possible to do this, but given how much power level with spellcasters can vary based on play style, available sources of spells, party composition, and types of threats, it’s important to be sure something is unbalanced before making constant back-and-forth adjustments. Also, players tend to become (quite reasonably) annoyed if the rules governing their characters change in play, and this can lead to hard feelings. So while guidelines for this option are given below, they should be considered only for GMs comfortable with their players and who have a very strong grasp on the games rules as a whole.

To create a new spell-points per day chart for a class, you must first determine how many spell-points it would take to cast all the spells the class’s existing spells per day chart grants them. If the class is a preparation spellcaster include 1 spell-point per 0-level spell, but do not do so for spontaneous spellcasters. (This is because preparation spellcasters must spend 1 spell-point to prepare a 0-level spell, while spontaneous spellcasters have access to a set number of 0-level spells as long as they have at least 1 spell-point). Call these values the class’s Spell Slot Value (SSV).

For caster levels 1-3, the class should receive 100% of its SSV as spell-points. For caster levels 4-5, it should receive 85% of its SSV. For caster levels 6-7, it gets 77.5% of its SSV, and at caster levels 8-12 it gets 80% of its SSV. This goes up to 82.5% at caster levels 13-15, down to 80% for levels 16-18, and back up to 82.5% of SSV at levels 19 and 20. Where it is possible to round out these numbers so a class gets a set number of spell-points for several levels in a row do so, but try not to vary more than 2.5% from these percentage values. When working on a full spellcasting class (one with 0-9 level spells), also consider rounding down spell-points earned at caster levels 7 and 16 as (in playtests) these proved to be levels where a full spellcasters with spell-points takes a major step forward in overall power.

If that (very complex) progression is too much trouble, just give the new class 100% of its SSV at caster levels 1-3, and 80% at all future levels.

Prestige Classes

When a prestige class grants +1 level in spells per day for a base class, the character receives spell-points as if he had gained a level in that base class.

For example, a wizard 5/fighter 1/eldritch knight 5 casts spells as a 9th level wizard, and thus also calculated spell-points as a 9th level wizard. If a prestige class gives a unique spell progression not based on the character’s previous base classes (not the case in any prestige class in the core rules, but certainly something a GM could design for his campaign, or that might be found in another book of supplemental rules), then a new spell-point chart must be created. This can be done using the same rules as given for creating charts for new base classes in Other Base Classes, above.

Multiclass Characters

If a character chooses to multiclass into more than one spellcasting class, the character may end up with numerous different pools of spell-points.

For example in an a particularly complex scenario, a multiclass cleric/wizard with a bonded item could end up with a cleric pool, a domain pool, a wizard pool, specialist pool, and bonded item pool. Clearly there is going to be a temptation to combine all these pools into a single big spell-point pool. However, to maintain game balance every pool of spell-points must be tracked separately.

The ability to use spell-points to cast any spell a character knows without preparation in advance, and focus their spell power to cast high-level spells numerous times, is already plenty of flexibility without adding the ability to cast cleric spells with wizard spell-points (though see the Eldritch Blending feat in Spell Point Feats, for an option to simplify things).

Favored Class Bonuses

When a character takes a level in a favored class, he gains a bonus. The two most common bonuses, available to every class/race combination, are +1 hit point and +1 skill point. However many other possible favored class bonuses have been presented in various books since the game was introduced, and many of those bonuses do not work well with the spell-point system. To ensure spell-points are as flexible and well-supported as traditional spellcasting rules, and can be used to add flavor and give depth to the races and cultures of a campaign, we present a number of new favored class bonuses below, designed to work with the spell-point system.

Universal

*Add +0.25 spell-points to your open spell pool and +0.25 spell-points to your reserve spell pool.

Racial Favored Class Bonuses

These options are available to specific races when taking a level in a favored class that has a spell-point pool. Alternatively, a GM may decide to restrict these options to specific race/ class combinations (such as only allowing dwarven clerics to gain the bonus listed below, and restricting all other dwarven spell-point spellcasters to the universal favored class bonus given above).

  • Dwarf: Add +1.5% to the percentage of the spell-points in your spell pool that is your open pool. Your reserve pool shrinks by the same number of spell-points.
  • Elf: Select one metamagic feat you that has a spell-point cost of +2 or more. Reduce its spell-point cost by -1/4. You cannot reduce its spell-point cost below +1, and reducing its cost does not change its spell level adjustment (you still cannot add metamagic feats that would raise a spell’s level to be higher than your maximum spell level). (This bonus is usable by half-elves.)
  • Gnome: You gain an illusion pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells you know of the illusion school. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Halfling: You gain a relaxed pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells if you are uninjured and not suffering any affliction or condition when you begin the casting time. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Human: Select one spell-point pool that is not an open or reserve pool. Reduce the number of spell-points in that pool by 1. Add +0.5 spell-points to your open pool, and +0.5 spell-points to your reserve pool.
  • Orc: You gain a bruised pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells if you are at 50% or less of your hit point total when you begin the casting time. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit. (This bonus is usable by half-orcs.)

Class Bonuses

A character may take these bonuses when taking a level in the appropriate favored class.

As written these are designed to be available to characters of any race, but a GM may opt to limit these class bonuses to specific races. For example, a GM might decide the listed cleric bonus applies only to human clerics, and clerics of other races are limited to the universal option or the bonus listed for their race, above.

  • Alchemist: You gain a mutagen pool of spell-points. These points may only be used while you are under the effects of a mutagen. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Bard: Select one spell you know. It cannot be your highest level of spell. If you cast this spell while maintaining a bardic performance it generates no eldritch dissonance (its spell-point cost does not increase). (See Eldritch Dissonance for more information on increasing spell-point costs).
  • Cleric: Add +0.75 spell-points to your domain pool.
  • Druid: Select one level of spells you can cast. Increase the number of spells you may attune to for this level of spells by +1. (See Divine Attunement for more information on attuning to spells).
  • Magus: Once per day you may spend points from your arcana pool to restore twice that number of spell-points to your open pool. The total number of points you may spend from your arcana pool is equal to the number of times you have selected this bonus.
  • Inquisitor: Gain a +1/4 bonus to Will saves made to prevent fatigue or exhaustion when you cast spells using your reserve pool.
  • Oracle: You gain a mystery pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells gained from your mystery. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Oracle: You gain a mystery pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells gained from your mystery. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Ranger: You gain a favored enemy pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells that have one or more favored enemies as the only targets. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Summoner: You gain an eidolon pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells that have your eidolon as the only target. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Sorcerer: You gain a bloodline pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells gained from your bloodline. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.
  • Wizard: Select one spell from your favored school or favored element. (If you do not have a favored school or element, this spell may be from any school or element, but once you choose a school or element you must pick spells from the same school or element every time you take this bonus.) You calculate this spell’s eldritch dissonance as if you were a spontaneous spellcaster (increasing its cost by +1 spell-point each time you cast it on the same day, rather than increasing it by a value equal to its spell level). (See Eldritch Dissonance for more information on increasing spell-point costs).
  • Witch: You gain a patron pool of spell-points, which function like a cleric’s domain pool (see the entry on clerics) but are used to cast spells gained from your patron. This pool has 0.75 spell-points for each level you select this benefit.

Spell Point Feats

Cooperative Casting

You can help other spellcasters fuel their spells.

Prerequisite(s): 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): As a full-round action, you can prepare to assist an adjacent spellcaster. When the character you have prepared to help casts a spell before the beginning of your next turn, as an immediate action you can spend 1 spell-point from your open pool to reduce the number of spell-points your ally must spend by 1. You cannot take spell-points from a reserve pool or other source when using this feat.

If both you and the allied spellcaster you assist have the Cooperative Casting feat, you may spend spell-points up to half the spell’s cost, to reduce the spell-points your ally spends by the same number.

Eldritch Aptitude

You gain a greater benefit than most from your high ability score

Prerequisite(s): 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): The maximum number of bonus spell-points you can receive from a high spellcasting ability score is equal to your caster level, rather than your maximum spell level. (See Determining Spell Points for more information on gaining bonus spell-points from a high ability score.) Additionally, when your caster level reaches 10 or higher, you gain an additional set of bonus spell-points equal to your spellcasting ability score bonus.

Eldritch Aspect

You gain a greater benefit than most from your high ability score

Prerequisite(s): 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You can use a fraction of your spell-points to take on a magical totem. This gives you a minor bonus and changes your appearance. For a cost of 3 spell-points you may gain one magical totem, selecting one creature a wizard could take as a familiar. Your head (and possibly hands and other features) take on the appearance of that creature and you gain the benefits a wizard with that familiar would gain. For example, if you took on the aspect of a raven you would gain a +3 bonus to Appraise checks.

You may use spell-points from any spell-point pool to use this feat. An aspect remains until you dismiss it as a free action or you regain your daily allotment of spell-points. You may take on multiple aspects, paying a separate spell-point cost for each, with each additional aspect adding some element of that creature’s appearance to your own.

Eldritch Blending

You have learned to call on multiple sources of magic to cast spells.

Prerequisite(s): Levels in more than one class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): Add all your open spell-point pools together to form a single open spell-point pool.

Add all your reserve spell-point pools together to form a single reserve spell-point pool. You may use these pools to cast any spell you may cast with open or reserve spell pools. This does not impact spell-points you have that are not open or reserve pools (such as domain pools or bonded item pools).

Eldritch Focus

Your deep understanding of one spell makes it easier to cast.

Prerequisite(s): Ability to cast 2nd level spells, 3 levels in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): Select one 2nd-level or higher spell you know. If you are a preparation spellcaster, you calculate this spell’s eldritch dissonance as if you were a spontaneous spellcaster (increasing its cost by +1 spell-point each time you cast it on the same day, rather than increasing it by a value equal to its spell level). If you are a spontaneous spellcaster, reduce its spell-point cost by 2.

Eldritch Insight

You can increase the effectiveness of your senses and hunches by drawing on your spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Wis 17, 1 level in a class that grants bonus spell-points based on your Wis modifier.

Benefit(s): When you make a Wis check, or Wisdom-based skill check, you may call upon eldritch instincts to assist you by spending spell-points.

You receive a competence bonus to the check equal to the number of spell-points spent. You cannot spend more spell-points than half your level (rounding up) on a single check. If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain a bonus to a skill check you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Eldritch Intellect

You can increase the effectiveness of your thinking by drawing on your spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Int 17, 1 level in a class that grants bonus spell-points based on your Int modifier.

Benefit(s): When you make an Int check, or Intelligence-based skill check, you may call upon eldritch knowledge to assist you by spending spell-points. You receive a competence bonus to the check equal to the number of spell-points spent.

You cannot spend more spell-points than half your level (rounding up) on a single check. If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain a bonus to a skill check you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Eldritch Intensity

You can increase the effectiveness of your personality by drawing on your spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 17, 1 level in a class that grants bonus spell-points based on your Cha modifier.

Benefit(s): When you make a Cha check, or Charisma-based skill check, you may call upon eldritch intensity to assist you by spending spell-points.

You receive a competence bonus to the check equal to the number of spell-points spent. You cannot spend more spell-points than half your level (rounding up) on a single check. If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain a bonus to a skill check you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Eldritch Knack

You can channel spell energy into your efforts to perform a skill.

Prerequisite(s): Int, Wis, or Cha 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You can use a fraction of your spell-points to enhance your ability to successfully use a skill. This is a free action, but you may only use this ability once per round and must choose to spend the spell-points prior to making the skill check. You may only use this ability on class skills. You gain a bonus to the skill check equal to double the number of skill points you expend.

You may not spend more skill points than you have ranks in the skill. You may use spell-points from any spell-point pool to use this feat.

Eldritch Strike (Combat)

You can use spell-points to increase the magical boost you give your weapons.

Prerequisite(s): Arcane Strike, ability to cast arcane spells, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): When you use Arcane Strike, you may spend up to a number of spell-points equal to the damage bonus received from that feat as part of same the swift action. For each spell-point spent you may add 1d3 cold, electricity, or fire damage to your weapon, or 1d2 acid or sonic damage. This effect lasts as long as Arcane Strike.

Extra Spell Points

 

Prerequisite(s): 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You gain additional spell-points equal to half your caster level, minimum +1 spell-point. Half of these spell-points are added to your open pool, and the rest to your reserve pool. If you have more than one class that grants you spell-points, you may select which class’s open and reserve pools gain these points. Once this decision has been made, it cannot be changed.

Special: This feat may be selected more than once. Its effects stack.

Infused Arcana

You can increase the power of your arcane abilities by infusing them with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Int 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, arcane pool class feature.

Benefit(s): You can spend spell-points to temporarily gain access to a magus arcana you meet the prerequisites for, but have not taken.

Each time you use this ability you may select one such arcana, and gain access to it for one minute.

The first time each day you use this ability it costs 1 spell-point, and each additional use in the same day has a spell-point cost 1 higher (2 spell-points the second time you use it, three spell-points the third time, and so on). If you use this ability while the duration of an arcana you gained earlier is still running, you immediately lose access to the earlier arcana.

You may not spend more spell-points to gain access to an arcana than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain access to an arcana you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Aspect

You can increase the power of your arcane link to your eidolon by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, eidolon class feature.

Benefit(s): You can spend spell-points to temporarily gain access to a 1-point evolution your eidolon has.

You must meet the evolution’s prerequisites, and cannot select the skilled evolution. Each time you use this ability you may select one such evolution, and gain access to it for one minute. The first time each day you use this ability it costs 1 spell-point, and each additional use in the same day has a spell-point cost 1 higher (2 spell-points the second time you use it, three spell-points the third time, and so on). If you use this ability while the duration of an evolution you gained earlier is still running, you immediately lose access to the earlier evolution.

You may not spend more spell-points to gain access to an evolution than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain access to an evolution you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Bomb

You can increase the effectiveness of your bombs by infusing them with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Int 13, 1 level in a class that grants an extract pool, bomb class feature.

Benefit(s): When you throw a splash weapon (including bombs from the bomb class feature), you may also spend extract points from your open or reserve pool to increase the weapon’s damage by 2 points for every 1 spell-point spent to do so.

You may not spend more extract points to augment a single splash weapon than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to infuse a bomb you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to create an extract.

Infused Channel

 

You can increase the effectiveness of your channeled energy by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Wis 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, channel energy class feature.

Benefit(s): When you channel energy, you may also spend spell-points from your open or reserve pool to increase the effect of the channeled energy, as outlined below.

You may increase the radius of the channel energy by +5 ft. for every 2 spell-points spent to do so.

You may increase the total damage dealt or healed by the channeled energy by 1 point for every 1 spell-point spent to do so.

You may cause the channeled energy to both heal living creatures and harm undead (for positive energy) or heal undead and harm living creatures (for negative energy) for 5 spell-points.

You may not spend more spell-points to augment a single use of channel energy than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to infuse channeled energy you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Heritage

You can increase the influence of your bloodline by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, bloodline class feature.

Benefit(s): You can spend spell-points to temporarily gain access to a bloodline feat you meet the prerequisites for, but have not taken.

Each time you use this ability you may select one such feat, and gain access to it for one minute.

The first time each day you use this ability it costs 1 spell-point, and each additional use in the same day has a spell-point cost 1 higher (2 spell-points the second time you use it, three spell-points the third time, and so on). If you use this ability while the duration of a feat you gained earlier is still running, you immediately lose access to the earlier feat.

You may not spend more spell-points to gain access to a feat than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain access to a bloodline feat you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Hex

You can increase the effectiveness of your hexes by infusing them with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Int 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, hex class feature.

Benefit(s): When you use a hex, you may also spend spell-points from your open or reserve pool to increase the effect of the hex, as outlined below.

If the hex normally has a 30-foot range, you may increase the range of the hex by +15 ft. for every spell-point spent to do so.

You may increase the total damage dealt or healed by the hex by 2 points for every 1 spell-point spent to do so. This has no impact on hexes that do not normally deal or heal damage.

You may use the hex a second time on a target you are normally only allowed to use it once per day on for 5 spell-points.

You may not spend more spell-points to augment a single hex than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to infuse a hex you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Judgment

You can increase the effectiveness of your judgments by infusing them with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Wis 13, 3 levels in a class that grants a spell-point pool, judgment class feature.

Benefit(s): When you initiate or maintain a judgment, you may also spend spell-points from your open or reserve pool to increase the effect of the judgment. By spending 2 spell-points you may boost your effective inquisitor level by +4 for purposes of calculating the judgment’s effectiveness. This bonus lasts until the beginning of your next round (though you may continue to pay the spell-points to infuse the judgment each round, if you wish).

Infused Performance

You can increase the effectiveness of your bardic performance by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 13, 3 levels in a class that grants a spell-point pool, bardic performance class feature.

Benefit(s): When you initiate or maintain a bardic performance, you may also spend spell-points from your open or reserve pool to increase the effect of the performance. By spending 2 spell-points you may boost your effective bard level by +4 for purposes of calculating the bardic performance’s effectiveness. This bonus lasts until the beginning of your next round (though you may continue to pay the spell-points to infuse the performance each round, if you wish).

If you can maintain more than one performance at a time you may infuse each performance separately, paying the spell-point cost for each. You may not spend more spell-points to augment your bardic performances each round than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to infuse a performance you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Revelation

You can increase the power of your mystery by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool, mystery class feature.

Benefit(s): You can spend spell-points to temporarily gain access to one revelation you meet the prerequisites for, but have not taken.

Each time you use this ability you may select one such revelation, and gain access to it for one minute. The first time each day you use this ability it costs 1 spell point, and each additional use in the same day has a spell point cost 1 higher (2 spell points the second time you use it, three spell points the third time, and so on). If you use this ability while the duration of a revelation you gained earlier is still running, you immediately lose access to the earlier revelation.

You may not spend more spell-points to gain access to a revelation than half your caster level (rounding up). If you spend points from your reserve pool to gain access to a revelation you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Infused Wild Shape

You can increase the effectiveness of your wild shape by infusing it with spell power.

Prerequisite(s): Wis 13, 5 levels in a class that grants a spell-point pool, wild shape class feature.

Benefit(s): When you use your wild shape, you may also spend spell-points from your open or reserve pool to increase the ability scores of the form you take. By spending 3 spell-points you may gain a +4 enhancement bonus to Str, Dex, or Con while in the wild shape form. Your total ability score (including any size bonuses) cannot exceed the ability score of the creature you take the form of. At 11th level you may spend 6 spell-points to gain +4 enhancement bonuses to 2 ability scores while in wild form, with the same limitations.

If you spend points from your reserve pool to infuse a wild shape you must make a Will save to avoid fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness just as if you had used the points to cast a spell.

Magic of the Wild

You can draw power directly from the forces of nature.

Prerequisite(s): Wis 13, nature bond or favored terrain class feature, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): Select one terrain from the ranger favored terrain class feature. If you have the favored terrain class feature, the selected terrain must be one of your favored terrains. When you are in this terrain you have an additional pool of spell-points, your terrain pool. Your terrain pool is equal to half your caster level, minimum +1 spell-point. You may use these points to pay or help pay the cost of any spell you cast. When you are not in the selected terrain, you cannot use these spell-points for any purpose.

Special: You may select this feat more than once. Its effects do not stack. Instead each time you select it, you may add 2 terrains in which you may access your terrain pool. The number of spell-points in your terrain pool do not increase as a result of taking this feat multiple times.

Metamastery

You are adept at altering the effects of your spells quickly.

Prerequisite(s): Int 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You do not increase the casting time of spells you cast with spell-points when adding a metamagic effect.

Normal: When applying metamagic to a spell cast using spell-points, spells with a casting time of a standard action become a full-round action and those with a longer casting time take an extra full-round action to cast.

Mystic Resilience

You are less likely to tire when you draw upon your reserves of mystic energy.

Prerequisite(s): 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You gain a +3 bonus to Will saves made to avoid fatigue or exhaustion when you use spell-points from your reserve pool.

Spell Eater

You can absorb eldritch energy used against you.

Prerequisite(s): Ability to cast dispel magic, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): When you successfully counterspell a spell, or roll a natural 20 on a saving throw against a spell (and take no effect from it), you absorb some of the eldritch energy used and gain temporary spell-points. You gain a number of temporary spell-points equal to half the level of the spell you resist or counterspell, to a maximum of 1/2 your caster level. You may add these spell-points to your open pool, or any specialty spell pool you have (such as a domain pool or bonded item pool). These spell-points fade at a rate of 1 points to your open pool, or any specialty spell pool you have (such as a domain pool or bonded item pool). These spell-points fade at a rate of 1 points expended when you use the associated spell pool. You cannot absorb more spell-points in a day with this feat than your caster level.

Tantric Magic

You can turn the energy of physical intimacy into mystic energy able to fuel your spells.

Prerequisite(s): Cha 13, 1 level in a class that grants a spell-point pool.

Benefit(s): You can restore some spell-points by engaging in sexual activity with a partner.

This takes 15 minutes per spell-point restored and requires uninterrupted concentration. You may restore spell-points from any spell-point pool, but may not restore points from your open pool until your reserve pool is full. You cannot restore more spell-points per day that half your caster level or your Charisma bonus, whichever is higher, and cannot increase any spell-point pool to above its normal maximum.

Successfully restoring spell-points requires you make both a Charisma check (to generate the right level of carnal energy) and Spellcraft check (to convert the generated energy into spell-points). The DCs for these checks is 15 + the number of spell-points to be restored. On a failed check no spell-points are regained. A GM may allow you to replace the Charisma check with an appropriate Perform or Profession check.

After attempting to use this feat to restore spell-points, whether you succeed or fail, you must wait before you can try again on the same day. After an hour you may make a Constitution check with a DC equal to the DC of your previous Tantric Magic effort (bonuses from the Endurance feat apply to this check.) If you succeed you may use the feat again, if you fail you must wait an hour and make another Constitution check. The DC of this check decreases by 1 for every hour that has passed since you last used the feat.

Spell-Point Magic Items

Ring of Wizardry

Aura: moderate (wizardry I) or strong (wizardry II–IV) (no school); CL: 11th (I), 14th (II), 17th (III), 20th (IV); Slot: ring; Price: 20,000 gp (I), 40,000 gp (II), 70,000 gp (III), 100,000 gp (IV); Weight: —

DESCRIPTION

This special ring comes in four kinds (ring of wizardry I, ring of wizardry II, ring of wizardry III, and ring of wizardry IV), all of them useful to spell-point spellcasters. The wearer’s spells for one specific spell level do not generate eldritch dissonance. A ring of wizardry I prevents 1st-level spells from generating eldritch dissonance, a ring of wizardry II does the same for 2nd-level spells, a ring of wizardry III for 3rd-level spells, and a ring of wizardry IV for 4th-level spells.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Forge Ring; Spells limited wish; Cost: 10,000 gp (I), 20,000 gp (II), 35,000 gp (III), 50,000 gp (IV)

Pearl of Power

Aura: strong transmutation; CL: 17th; Slot: —; Price: 1,000 gp (+1 spell-point), 4,000 gp (+2 spell-point), 9,000 gp (+3 spell-point), 16,000 gp (+4 spell-point), 25,000 gp (+5 spell-point), 36,000 gp (+6 spell-point), 49,000 gp (+7 spell-point), 64,000 gp (+8 spell-point), 81,000 gp (+9 spell-point); Weight: —

DESCRIPTION

This seemingly normal pearl of average size and luster is a potent aid to all spellcasters who use spell-points. Each pearl of power holds a specific number of spell-points the possessor can use the spell-points it contains to help pay the spell-point cost of a spell being cast. A spellcaster cannot use more than one pearl of power to help pay the spell-point cost of a single spell.

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

Feats Craft Wondrous Item; Special creator must be able to cast spells of a level equal to the number of spell-points within the pearl; Cost 500 gp (1st), 2,000 gp (2nd), 4,500 gp (3rd), 8,000 gp (4th), 12,500 gp (5th), 18,000 gp (6th), 24,500 gp (7th), 32,000 gp (8th), 40,500 gp (9th), 35,000 gp (two spells)

Optional Spell Point Rules

Overcasting

Overcasting is an optional rule that allows spellcasters to cast spells even after they are out of spell-points. While this does expand the total power available to spell-point spellcasters, it comes with a heavy cost (see below), and allows for the kinds of heroic sacrifices common in fantasy fiction. It’s worth noting that GMs must be careful with systems like this. If a PC manages to keep casting without killing himself, he can bring much, much more power to the table. If he dies off on his first effort, the player can feel cheated. and of course for high-level games, a resurrection or true resurrection may be considered just the cost of getting off another couple of meteor swarms, which can throw off the balance.

The first time a character overcasts he is automatically fatigued if not already suffering the condition. The second time, he is automatically exhausted. Each time a caster casts a spell with no spell-points available (including the first two), the character must make a Fort save or die, with a DC of 15 + spell-points spent beyond the spellcaster’s pool + number of spells he’s cast since running out of spell-points. This is considered a death effect for purposes of returning the character to life.

For exactly the right game and right group of player’s, the tension and dynamics are a great addition to the game. For many groups, it’s a hassle and more likely to lead to resentment than additional fun.

Reduced Casting Level

Sometimes a spellcaster wants to conserve spell-points, and doesn’t need the full power of a spell. Reduced casting level is an alternate rule to give spell-point spellcasters a way to not use their spells to full effect and not pay their full cost.

When casting a spell with a reduced caster level, the spell’s save DC (if any) is reduced by one, and all spell calculations are made with only half the spellcaster’s caster level – including how easily the spell is affected by such things as dispel magic. (A spellcaster must be at least 2nd level to use reduced casting level). Only spells that have some numerical calculation (such as range, duration, number of targets, or damage dealt) based on caster level may be cast at reduced caster level.

Such spells have their spell-point cost reduced by 1, to a minimum cost of 1.

For many groups reduced casting level is a logical extension of the spell-point rules, but it also allows savvy players to only reduce their caster level when there is very little chance doing so will have reduction in the spell’s effectiveness. This in turn increases the number of spells they can cast each day, which can have an unbalancing effect.

A GM who wants to allow reduced casting level as an option, but not give it as a free ability to all spellcaster, may decide to allow characters to have access to this rule if they spend a feat to do so.

Section 15: Copyright Notice