Downtime

Overview

Downtime Terminology

Downtime and Kingdom Building

Gaining Capital

Converting Capital
Moving Capital
Spending Limits
Using Followers

Table: Capital Values
Table: Skilled Capital Earnings
Table: Settlement Spending Limits

Working Weekends

Downtime Phases

Upkeep Phase
Activity Phase
Income Phase
Event Phase

Spend Capital to Boost Checks

Managers

Reading a Manager Stat Block
Example Managers

Downtime Activities

Add Spells to Your Spellbook
Construct Buildings
Craft Magic Items
Craft Mundane Items
Earn Capital
Earn XP
Gather Information
Heal Others
Lead Your Kingdom
Promote a Business
Replace Your Animal Companion
Replace Your Familiar
Recruit for an Organization
Research a Spell
Research Facts and Lore
Rest
Retrain
Run a Business
Scheme for an Upcoming Adventure
Train an Animal

Rooms and Teams

Reading a Unit Stat Block
Construction and Recruitment Delays
Moving an Organization
Rooms
Room Augmentations
Teams

Construction Examples

Restrictions on Earnings

Buildings and Organizations

Buildings
Organizations

Downtime Events

Generic Building Events

Table: Generic Building Events

Building-specific Events

Table: Alchemist Events
Table: Bardic College Events
Table: Caster's Tower Events
Table: Castle Events
Table: Dance Hall Events
Table: Guildhall Events
Table: Herbalist Events
Table: House Events
Table: Inn Events
Table: Library Events
Table: Magic Shop Events
Table: Magical Academy Events
Table: Menagerie Events
Table: Military Academy Events
Table: Monastery Events
Table: Shop Events
Table: Smithy Events
Table: Stable Events
Table: Tavern Events
Table: Temple Events
Table: Theater Events

Organization Events

Table: Cabal Events
Table: Cult Events
Table: Mercenary Company Events
Table: Thieves' Guild Events

In many campaigns, returning to town after an adventure is a lull in your character's activity. You sell loot, stock up on potions, and perhaps wait around for the wizard to scribe some scrolls. However, there is much more you can do in town in between adventures—your character might want to practice with a military school, start a guild, build a temple, train a new pet, and so on. Normally you and the other PCs would have to compete for the GM's attention so you can explain what your characters want to do and haggle over how much time that should take. With the rules presented here, what you can do with a day of downtime is clearly spelled out, allowing you to get on with your plans.

Even if you don't want to use the rules to earn extra gold or throw your weight around in town as a business owner, there are campaign and roleplaying benefits for using the downtime system. For example, if you build or buy a house, you have a comfortable, private place to rest between adventures. By adding a few more rooms, you can easily convert a house into a base of operations for your adventuring party; it would count as "very familiar" for the purpose of your teleport spells, and if it includes an altar to your deity, you can use it as the destination for a word of recall.

Additionally, if you have a business, the GM can insert campaign events and story awards tied to it. You might earn XP as a story award when your business earns its first 1,000 gp or first 100 points of Goods. If you own a restaurant, the king might hear about your famous soup recipe and arrange a visit to sample it. If you have a tavern, it could become a hangout for young adventurers hoping your luck and success rub off on them. In either case, the GM may award you Influence instead of XP for these events.

Of course, having a building or organization has its risks. Your enemies might try to burn down your tavern or attack you at your home. If you start a thieves' guild and are away for months at a time, a personable rogue might take over the guild and turn it against you. If a dragon attacks the town, it could destroy your house (and give you a perfect setup for you taking the Nemesis story feat). Investing yourself in a community means you're part of it—for good or ill. The GM should remember to use that investment to enrich the campaign, not just exploit it as a way to attack your character or strong-arm you into adventures.

The downtime system is designed to put much of the power and decision making for non-adventuring tasks in the hands of the players. These rules assume the reader is a player making decisions about what his character does during downtime. However, the GM is still in charge of the campaign and the final judge of what is possible using this system; these rules simply take much of the burden away from busy GMs, allowing them more time to work on creating adventures and other campaign issues.

Overview

The key parts of the downtime rules that you'll be referencing often are the following:

  • Explanation of the downtime terminology used throughout this chapter (see below).
  • Earning downtime capital such as Goods, Influence, and Labor.
  • The phase sequence for using downtime
  • The kinds of activities you can do with this system.
  • Constructing rooms, the building blocks of buildings such as guildhalls or temples, and recruiting teams such as apprentices and guards.
  • Example buildings constructed out of rooms, and example organizations built out of teams.
  • Positive and negative events that can occur during downtime.

Downtime Terminology

This section explains the basic game terms for the downtime system. It uses existing character abilities (such as skill checks and saving throws), familiar resources (such as gold pieces), and new resources specific to the downtime system. Together, these allow you to accomplish tasks.

Building: A building is a physical structure you construct or purchase, such as a house, inn, or temple. The downtime system allows you to construct buildings out of specialized rooms (see Rooms and Teams).

Downtime and Kingdom Building

The downtime system is a middle ground between personal projects (like crafting a new set of armor) and large-scale tasks (like ruling a kingdom). These rules interface with both ends of that scale, and aren't intended to completely replace them. In many cases, they might slightly contradict what is presented in the kingdom-building rules in Chapter 4. For example, the kingdom-building rules allow you to construct any type of building in 1 month, even a grand palace, which would take much longer using the downtime system. That is because the leader of a kingdom can spend build points to muster incredible amounts of resources and make things happen, far beyond what even a popular hero can do by spending gold and calling in favors. If your GM is using both the downtime system and the kingdom-building rules and there are conflicts over how to handle a situation, the GM decides which method is used, but should lean toward whichever rules seem most appropriate and efficient for the task.

Build Points: A build point (BP) is a unit of wealth and productivity used in the kingdom-building rules. The downtime system doesn't normally use BP, but if you are using the kingdom-building rules, you may have ways to spend BP as part of your downtime. BP are a larger-scale combination of Goods, Influence, Labor, and Prestige.

Business: A business is a building or organization that earns you one or more kinds of capital, such as a blacksmith's shop or thieves' guild.

Capital: Capital is any sort of resource you can spend as part of downtime. The various types of capital are build points, gp, days, Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic. You can spend capital on various downtime activities such as constructing buildings, recruiting followers, and retraining your feats. If any situation or event causes you to lose more capital than you have, your capital is reduced to 0 — you can't go into debt.

Day: The downtime system measures time in days rather than hours, minutes, or rounds. Most downtime activities require you to spend at least 1 day on the activity.

Followers: Followers are a type of Labor gained from the Leadership feat or other methods. Followers can be used like Labor, but aren't expended like capital because they are loyal to you and don't leave as soon as an activity is completed. For more information, see Using Followers.

Goods: Goods represent physical items necessary for an activity, which can be permanent fixtures or consumable items. For building an inn, Goods are the materials used to build the structure, the tables and chairs, and the food and beverages you plan to sell. Goods as capital are an abstraction so that you don't need to keep track of gathering things like stones for a building's foundation, timber for the walls, ingredients for the menu, and so on. Goods might also represent natural resources (such as fertile soil or a spring), in which case you're not literally moving these items to a specific location — instead, you're spending capital to acquire a location with those resources.

Gold Pieces: Gold pieces (or gp) constitute the normal money your character has, such as from looting monsters or earning a living with Craft or Profession checks. Many downtime activities require you to spend gp.

Influence: Influence represents your ability to get other people in the settlement to perform favors for you or use their skills to accomplish things (as opposed to Labor, which involves hard physical work). This includes getting a merchant to change the terms of a contract, or convincing a politician to do you a favor.

Labor: Labor represents using workers to accomplish tasks. This includes hiring carpenters to construct a building, hiring thugs to extort shopkeepers, using assistants to help you craft items or tend injuries, or hiring employees to run your business while you're away.

Magic: Magic represents magical power at your disposal. Some activities, such as healing sick peasants in the slums or constructing a magical library, specifically require you to spend Magic.

Organization: This is a group of people who do what you say (such as a cult, thieves' guild, or mercenary company). An organization may or may not have a base of operations. The downtime system allows you to recruit organizations made up of specialized teams (see Rooms and Teams).

Gaining Capital

Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic are the backbone of the downtime system. These types of capital are necessary for completing many downtime activities. You can gain such capital in one of two ways: by purchasing it or by earning it.

Table: Capital Values
Capital Purchased Cost Earned Cost
Goods 20 gp 10 gp
Influence 30 gp 15 gp
Labor 20 gp 10 gp
Magic 100 gp 50 gp

Purchasing Capital: The easiest way to gain capital is to purchase it by buying materials, bribing people, paying administrative fees, hiring workers, and so on. Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic each have a specific gp value for this method, listed in the Purchased Cost column of Table: Capital Values. If you need one of these types of capital, you can spend gp to get it, just like buying a +1 sword or hiring a spellcaster to cast remove curse costs you gp. For example, Goods have a Purchased Cost of 20 gp each; if you need to spend 5 points of Goods to repair your tavern, you can spend 100 gp (5 × 20 gp) to purchase the necessary Goods. Purchasing capital is fast, but expensive.

Earning Capital: Many downtime activities, such as doing mundane work with a Craft or Profession skill or gaining the day-to-day profits for running an inn or tavern, allow you to earn capital (see the Earn Capital activity). Earning capital is like using an item crafting feat to create a magic item: You have to put in some work to make the item, but you pay only half the normal price for it. If a downtime activity's description says it generates capital, you can earn that amount of capital by spending the required amount of downtime and gp on it; the gp cost for the capital is half the normal cost, as listed in the Earned Cost column of Table: Capital Values. For example, Influence has an Earned Cost of 15 gp per point, so if you want to socialize in town to generate 3 points of Influence, you must use a day of downtime and spend 45 gp (3 × 15 gp) to earn those 3 points of Influence. Earning capital takes longer, but is much cheaper than just buying it outright. It is easier to keep track of your earned capital if you pay for it as soon as you earn it; otherwise, you also need to track earned capital you don't yet have (because you haven't paid gp for it yet).

This chapter assumes you are using the downtime system to earn capital rather than purchasing it, and all gp values in this chapter are based on the Earned Cost. If you aren't using the downtime system to earn capital (and are instead awarded capital as a treasure reward, for example), or you want to purchase something quickly by spending gold pieces, remember to double the listed gp value to find the Purchased Cost of the item or service.

Think of purchasing capital as a stranger coming to town and throwing lots of money around to make things happen. It's effective, but the locals are inclined to overcharge for their work and may resent the obvious display of wealth. Earning capital is a person working with the locals and trying to be a part of the community in order to get things done. It takes longer, but the locals give a fair price and appreciate the person's honest dealings and lack of arrogance.

When you purchase or earn capital, you may either immediately apply it toward a downtime activity of your choice or save it for later (this is explained more over the rest of this chapter). As capital is an abstraction, the details of the work are up to you and the GM to decide — for roleplaying purposes, you should explain it however is most appropriate for your character and campaign.

Unskilled Work: You may spend 1 day working in a settlement to earn 5 sp. (Normally, an untrained laborer or assistant earns 1 sp per day, but the downtime system assumes your class abilities mean you are a cut above a typical unskilled laborer and are able to earn more from a day's work.) Alternatively, you can choose to instead earn 1 point of Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic. Neither approach requires any particular knowledge or skill check.

Example: Mark's character is constructing a house, and he wants to acquire 1 point of Labor, which he plans to spend on the house's construction requirements. He decides to use 1 day of downtime and pay 10 gp to earn the point of Labor, instead of paying 20 gp to purchase it outright. He immediately spends this 1 point of Labor on the construction requirements of the house. For roleplaying purposes, Mark states that he used the day to dig a foundation for his house, and spent the 10 gp on the tools and raw materials he needed to start the foundation.

Example: Laura's character plans to build a blacksmith's shop, and needs 1 point of Labor. She decides to use 1 day of downtime and pay 10 gp to earn the 1 point of Labor, but saves it for later use. Since construction work is out of character for him, Laura explains that her character spent the day making deliveries for a local mason, who in turn promised to help her build her blacksmith's shop. The gold cost goes toward this future construction, but for ease of tracking, Laura pays for it now. She doesn't have to keep track of this 1 point of Labor as "1 point of Labor from a mason," since the exact nature of Labor matters only for roleplaying purposes. None of the downtime activities require specific kinds of labor.

Skilled Work: If you have ranks in a useful skill, you can spend 1 day working in a settlement to earn more capital than you would doing unskilled work. Note that this method includes both legal and illegal means of earning capital—for example, a day spent using Sleight of Hand to earn money could be a day spent performing as a street magician or a day spent pickpocketing.

Choose either one type of capital (Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic) or gp, and attempt a skill check. You can take 10 on this check.

If you chose gp, divide the result of your check by 10 to determine how many gp you earn that day. For example, if your check result is a 16, dividing it by 10 earns you 1 gp and 6 sp that day (round to the nearest silver).

Table: Skilled Capital Earnings
Skill Check Result Capital Earned* (Goods, Influence, Labor, Or Magic)
10 1
20 2
30 3
40 4

* For every 10 points of your check result after 40, you earn an additional capital.

If you chose Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic, consult Table: Skilled Capital Earnings to see how much of that type of capital you earn. You must pay the Earned Cost to buy this capital, although if you can't afford to buy all of it or don't need more than a certain amount, you can choose to earn less capital than your check indicates. See Table: Capital Values for the Earned Cost of each type of capital.

If you are using this option to earn Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic, the skill you're using must be suitable for earning the chosen type of capital; if the GM deems it is not, using that skill reduces the amount generated by half (minimum 1). For example, Perform might earn you Influence as a musician, but it's not as useful for earning Labor. The GM should inform you of this before you attempt the skill check. In general, the appropriate skills for each type of capital are as follows.

Goods: Appraise, Bluff, Craft, Diplomacy, Disable Device, Handle Animal, Intimidate, Knowledge (dungeoneering, engineering, geography, history, local, nature, nobility, religion), Profession, Sleight of Hand, Stealth.

Influence: Appraise, Bluff, Craft, Diplomacy, Handle Animal, Heal, Intimidate, Knowledge (any), Linguistics, Perform, Profession, Ride.

Labor: Bluff, Climb, Craft, Diplomacy, Handle Animal, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), Profession, Ride, Survival, Swim.

Magic: Appraise, Craft, Diplomacy, Heal, Knowledge (arcana, dungeoneering, nature, planes, religion), Linguistics, Profession, Spellcraft, Use Magic Device.

Working Weekends

The Craft and Profession skills allow you to attempt a skill check once per week, earning an amount of gp equal to 1/2 your check result. If you were to divide that amount by 7, you'd get your earnings per day. However, that assumes you work 7 days per week, and most people take 2 days off per week for rest and worship, so that's only 5 days of actual work per week. Dividing your check result by 2 and then by 5 is the same as dividing by 10, which is why the downtime system has you divide your check result by 10 to determine gp earned per day. You can work 7 days per week (if you really need the 2 extra days for earning capital), but even mighty adventurers need a day off now and then!

The value of a particular skill for a given type of capital can vary from settlement to settlement. For example, in a frontier settlement with a tradition of serious hard work, a day of humorous performances using Perform (comedy) might not earn you much capital, but inspirational public speeches about the city's heroes using Knowledge (history) or Perform (oratory) could. The GM should tell you this before you attempt the skill check, or allow you to assess the inhabitants' preferences with a successful DC 15 Knowledge (local) or Sense Motive check.

Class Abilities: You can use a class ability to provide a service in the settlement to earn capital. For example, a fighter could train a noble's child in swordplay, a cleric could heal townsfolk, and so on. Choose either one type of capital (Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic) or gp, and attempt a check (1d20 + your character level + your highest ability modifier –5). You may take 10 on this check. Treat this check as your skill check result for using skilled work.

Using class abilities is less efficient than performing skilled work; this represents the fact that many classes' abilities don't have much direct benefit to a community. As with skilled work, the GM may rule that your abilities are unsuitable and reduce the amount earned by half.

Purchases: If you would rather spend gold than attempt checks to earn other types of capital, use the values listed in the Purchased Cost column of Table: Capital Values.

Although you can't sell capital, you can use it for its listed Purchased Cost as payment toward any applicable downtime activity that requires you to spend gp. For example, if you are brewing a potion, you can spend 1 point of Magic toward the cost of the materials needed to make the potion as if that point were equal to 100 gp.

Although you may have a lot of gp or other capital to throw around in a settlement, the settlement's size limits how much you can accomplish per day (see Spending Limits).

Rewards: a GM using the downtime system might award you various types of capital as monster loot, adventure rewards, inheritance, or natural resources. For example, if your party defeats a gang of smugglers, your treasure for the final encounter could include 5 points of Goods in addition to conventional treasure. After freeing a group of peasants from a hobgoblin tribe, the GM might decide that the freed prisoners have no money to give you as a reward but instead promise you 3 points of Labor as thanks for saving them. Your character could inherit a ramshackle house from an old relative, which you can use as a base of operations or sell for gold. After clearing out a kobold warren, you might discover a vein of iron ore that (after an investment of Goods, Labor, and perhaps Influence) can generate gp or Goods for you on a monthly basis. Depending on the nature of the reward, the GM might decide that you don't need to pay the Earned Cost to get capital acquired in this way.

These kinds of rewards are always decided by the GM. Keep in mind that a settlement's government usually has jurisdiction over what happens to an abandoned property. For example, just because you kill all the cultists using a building as their secret lair doesn't mean you can claim that building as your own.

Converting Capital

You can trade 3 points of Goods, Labor, Influence, or Magic for 1 point of Goods, Labor, or Influence. Under certain circumstances, the GM may allow you to trade these resources at a 2-for-1 rate rather than the normal 3-for-1. You can trade 5 points of Goods, Labor, or Influence for 1 point of Magic.

Moving Capital

Some types of capital — in particular Influence — might be specific to a particular settlement or region. Other types may be used at any settlement, though the GM might rule that there is a delay in transporting Goods or Labor to a new location before you can spend it there.

Table: Settlement Spending Limits
Settlement Spending Limit Per Day (Goods, Influence, Or Labor)
Thorp 2
Hamlet 4
Village 10
Small Town 15
Large town 25
Small city 35
Large city 50
Metropolis 65

Spending Limits

The population of a settlement limits how much help you can get on a given day. The numbers in Table: Settlement Spending Limits represent the limit of how much Goods, Influence, and Labor you can utilize in settlement each day. Even if you have a lot of Goods and Labor at your disposal from favors and such, a tiny settlement might have only a few hands to spare to turn that capital into finished projects.

Using Followers

The Leadership feat can grant you followers—people loyal to you who assist you if they are able. In the downtime system, followers provide additional Influence or Labor to supplement your activities at no cost to you. This increases the effect of Influence or Labor you spend by 50%, to a maximum of 1 additional Influence or Labor for every 2 followers in the settlement where the downtime activity takes place.

Under certain circumstances, the GM may rule that followers provide less of a benefit than the standard 50% increase. For example, if your followers live in a different settlement and must travel to your location, but bandit activity makes travel risky or they have been away from home for a week or more, the GM might decide that your followers increase the effect of Influence or Labor by only 1 for every 3 followers or even 1 for every 4. Your followers are loyal to you, but they are not slaves and can provide only so much help before they go about their normal lives.

Downtime Phases

The GM tells you when you have downtime available and how many days you can use for downtime. For example, after returning to town after a long adventure, if the GM says you have 10 days before you need to travel to the capital for the princess's coronation ceremony, you may use those 10 days for downtime activities.

You typically have a fair amount of control when it comes to starting and ending a downtime session. With the GM's approval, you may start a downtime session whenever you enter a settlement and end it whenever you leave that settlement. You or your GM might devise downtime activities you can perform only once per downtime session, so the GM may decide that you can't start and end multiple downtime sessions in a row just to allow yourself to perform those activities more than once.

A quick trip into town for basic supplies and rest likely doesn't require a downtime session. If you don't plan to do anything that requires Goods, Influence, Labor, Magic, or spending downtime days, you don't have to start a downtime session to do it.

A downtime session takes place over the following four phases, which make up 1 downtime day.

  • Phase 1—Upkeep: Pay costs associated with maintaining completed buildings and organizations.
  • Phase 2—Activity: Perform downtime activities, such as constructing a building, recruiting an organization, or retraining.
  • Phase 3—Income: Determine how much capital your buildings, organizations, and other activities generate, and sell off assets you no longer want.
  • Phase 4—Event: Check whether any unusual events occur. Some are beneficial, such as Famous Visitor or Good Fortune. Others are detrimental, such as Fire or Sickness.

These phases always occur in the above order. Each player may start one new downtime activity per day. Which player goes first usually doesn't matter; you may choose to go in initiative order, clockwise from the player to the GM's left, or some other method that works for your group so long as everyone gets a turn each day.

Upkeep Phase

If you have never performed any downtime activities in the settlement where you currently are, skip this phase and proceed to the Activity phase.

During the Upkeep phase, adjust your capital or other game statistics based on what's happened in previous days (whether those days were spent on downtime activities or were normal days). For example, if you have a manager running your tavern, you must pay her wages. If you want to retrain a feat you know (see Retraining) and are paying in installments, you must pay an installment.

  • Step 1—Add Up Costs: These costs include ongoing or recurring costs for your buildings, organizations, and other previous downtime activities that have accrued since the last time you have had a downtime session. Most of these costs are incurred daily, whether or not you are spending downtime days at the settlement.
  • Step 2—Pay Costs: If you cannot pay the costs you've incurred (either with your own capital or by borrowing from another character), you gain no benefit from those downtime activities until the day you do pay.
  • Step 3—Determine Capital Attrition: For every 7 days you were away from the settlement (whether downtime days or normal days), reduce your Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic by 1 each (minimum 0). This decrease represents spoilage, theft, allies moving on or having higher priorities, workers finding other employment, and so on.
  • Step 4—Determine Business Attrition: Business attrition is loss caused by poor morale among employees due to your absence. If a building doesn't generate capital (and therefore isn't a business), skip Step 4. Without any employees to speculate about your absence, there is no chance of mutiny. However, the GM may decide that opportunistic thieves, squatters, monsters, animals, or vermin may move into an abandoned building if you are gone for a long time, requiring you to clear them out if you want to use it again.
Spend Capital to Boost Checks

At the GM's discretion, you may affect any activity you have in the settlement (downtime or otherwise) by spending Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic. This gives you a lot of leeway in terms of what you can accomplish using downtime resources. In general, every 1 point of Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic spent allows you to add a +1 bonus on one skill check (maximum +5).

The capital spent must reasonably affect that kind of check. The GM decides whether your proposed use of a capital is reasonable for the check you're attempting.

Example: Jessica's character wants to bluff her way past a guard into the duke's castle, but knows that her Bluff modifier of +0 probably isn't enough to convince the guard to let her pass. Jessica tells the GM she wants to spend 5 points of Influence to remind the guard that she's one of the heroes who turned back the ogre invasion last month, and the guard should let her pass because the duke wants to talk to her. The GM agrees that Jessica flaunting her celebrity status is a good use of Influence and allows her to spend 5 points of Influence for a +5 bonus on her Bluff check.

Example: Patrick's character is having a drink in a tavern after a long day adventuring when his nemesis walks in and spots him. Patrick is out of spells and wants to avoid a fight. He tells the GM he stands up to confront his nemesis, and wants to spend 5 points of Labor to have other tavern patrons back him up, pointing out that he has employed many local workers in the past few months and some of them might be in the tavern. The GM agrees and allows him to spend 5 points of Labor for a +5 bonus on his Intimidate check.

Because adventuring is dangerous work, if you're away from a settlement for 30 days or more, you risk losing control of your businesses there as employees begin to wonder whether you're dead. Upon your return, you must attempt a leadership check (1d20 + your Leadership score) against a DC equal to the number of days since you last had contact with that businesses – 10 (so if you've been gone for 30 days, the DC is 20). Having contact with the business requires visiting it personally, sending a qualified representative on your behalf (such as a cohort or manager), or sending a formal letter or magical communication (such as dream, sending, or whispering wind); doing so resets your number of days away to 0.

If this Leadership check succeeds, the business remains under your control. For each business you've been away from for at least 30 days, you must continue to attempt this Leadership check each day until you make contact again.

If you fail, the people running the business in your absence no longer acknowledge you as its owner or leader, and you can't generate any capital from that business. Once you reestablish contact, you may attempt a Leadership check (at the same DC as for the check you failed) each day during the Upkeep phase to reaffirm your ownership of the business. If you succeed, the business is yours again and it resumes generating income (although you don't gain any of the income generated from the time you left to when you reasserted control).

If you lose control of a business, you don't deal with events associated with it. However, if you do intervene regarding a detrimental event and either prevent the event from happening or otherwise reverse its effects (such as catching robbers and returning the goods they stole), you gain a +5 bonus on your Leadership checks to reaffirm your ownership of that business. This bonus ends once you successfully reaffirm ownership of the business or abandon all claims to it. If you intervene in this way during multiple detrimental events that happen to a business, these bonuses stack.

Activity Phase

During the Activity phase, you declare new downtime activities or continue existing ones. Activities like beginning construction on a new building, continuing construction on an existing building, recruiting for a new organization, crafting magic items, or retraining skill points or a feat occur in this phase. You may also use this phase to take actions that do not require the downtime system.

  • Step 1—Perform Free Activities: You can perform any activities that don't require downtime days, such as buying gear, selling unwanted magic items, and bartering.
  • Step 2—Continue Ongoing Downtime Activity: Your first priority is continuing a downtime activity that requires more than 1 day. Depending on the specific requirements of that activity, interrupting it might ruin any progress you've made. Some activities might require only a small bit of your attention and still allow you to perform other downtime activities in this phase.
  • Step 3—Begin New Downtime Activity: If you aren't continuing an earlier downtime activity, or are continuing one that doesn't restrict you from starting a new activity, you can begin a new downtime activity. The list of downtime activities begins.

Example: Patrick's character has been crafting a wand of fireball, but had to interrupt the process just short of completion to have a short adventure that didn't give him any time to work on the item. When he returns to town and begins a downtime session, he sells some loot in Step 1 (which doesn't use any downtime days), then proceeds to Step 2. In Step 2, he decides to spend downtime finishing the work on the wand, which takes him 1 day of downtime. The next day, he has no ongoing downtime activities, so he proceeds to Step 3 and starts spending Influence to recruit an Apprentice wizard.

Income Phase

During the Income phase, you generate capital from downtime activities and from buildings and organizations you control.

  • Step 1—Determine Building Income: Attempt a capital check (see the Earnings section) for each building you control in the settlement that generates income and is able to provide you benefits. Add the results of all of these checks together, then divide by 10 to determine how many gp you earn that day. For example, if your total result is a 47, after dividing it by 10, your earnings come to 4 gp and 7 sp.
    • If you were away for multiple days, attempt one capital check for each day you were away (if the number of checks is enough to be cumbersome, take 10 on these checks). For every 7 days you've been away from the settlement (whether they were downtime days or not), reduce the total amount of gp earned by 7 and reduce the Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic earned by 1 each (minimum 0). Add the remaining capital to your character sheet or downtime tracking sheet.
    • If you were unable to pay the costs for a building in the Upkeep phase, or you lost control of a building because of attrition, you don't collect income for that building.
  • Step 2—Determine Organization Income: This works exactly like Step 1, but with organizations instead of buildings.
  • Step 3—Determine Other Income: If any of your other downtime activities generate income (such as using skills to earn capital), you collect that income during this step.
  • Step 4—Abandon Assets: If you wish to get rid of a building or organization without compensation, you can abandon it during this step. You are no longer the owner of the building or organization and no longer gain any benefits from it, but neither are you obligated to deal with events relating to it. Unlike losing a building or organization because of attrition, this loss is automatic and you can't attempt to reaffirm your ownership.
  • Step 5—Sell Assets: If you wish to sell a building or organization, you can do so during this step. You can sell a building or organization for half its cost to buy or create (based on either the gp or the Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic listed in the building's cost). There is a 75% chance that it takes you 3d6 days to find a buyer. This delay doesn't require you to spend any downtime days. You can shorten this delay, reducing it by 1d6 days (to a minimum of 0 days) for each 1 point of Influence you spend. You collect the proceeds upon the conclusion of the sale.
    • You can choose to sell only some of a room's buildings, leaving you in control of the remaining rooms. Any alterations to the building necessary for the sale are included when you make the sale.
    • Selling an organization is a process of reclaiming assets from your former employees, such as armor or weapons you provided to a Guard team. As with selling buildings, you can choose to liquidate only some of an organization's teams, such as divesting your thieves' guild of its Cutpurse and Acolyte teams.

Example: Laura is ready to determine what her character's buildings earned while she was off adventuring. Her house doesn't generate capital, and neither does her rebellious shop, so in Step 1 she has to deal with only the income from her tavern. The tavern has a +15 modifier on gp capital checks. Instead of making 40 separate checks for the 40 days she was gone, Laura takes 10, giving her a result of 25 on each check, for a total of 2 gp and 5 sp earned each day, then multiplies that amount by 40 to get 100 gp. Because of her 5 weeks of absence, she reduces this amount by 5 × 7 gp (35 gp), leaving her 65 gp in income, which she adds to her character sheet or her downtime tracking sheet. She has no organizations, so she skips Step 2. None of her other activities during this downtime session are generating income, so she skips Step 3. She doesn't want to abandon or sell her house or tavern, and plans to try to regain control of the rebellious shop during the next Upkeep phase, so she decides to not abandon or sell any assets, skipping Step 4 and 5.

Event Phase

During the Event phase, a random event might affect your downtime. This could be a generic event or an event relating specifically to one of your buildings or organizations.

There is a 20% chance each downtime day of an event occurring in a settlement, and the GM then determines (usually randomly) which PC-controlled building is affected. If no event occurred the previous downtime day, the event chance increases by 5% from the day before (maximum 95%). For convenience, the GM may increment the chance of having an event and roll for events only when you are in the settlement, as dealing with events while you are away for long periods creates extra bookkeeping. Once a downtime event occurs, the chance per day of having an event drops to 20% again. See the Downtime Events section to determine what sort of event occurs.

Some events can be negated, compensated for, or ended with a check. Others require you to complete an adventure or deal with a problem in a way not covered by the downtime rules—in effect, they include a way for the GM to add a little excitement and unpredictability into downtime.

In addition, the GM may have an adventure- or campaign-specific event take place during downtime.

Downtime Activities

This section provides many examples of activities you can undertake during downtime. Some of these are new, and others expand on options to explain how those activities relate to the downtime rules. In most cases, using the downtime rules doesn't change the costs for performing the action, but it might allow you to spend capital instead of gp as per Table: Capital Values. You can substitute 1 point of Goods or Labor for 20 gp, 1 point of Influence for 30 gp, and 1 point of Magic for 100 gp where appropriate. You can combine multiple types of capital when substituting for a gp value.

Some downtime activities allow you to spend Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic to modify the outcome of a check. You must decide to spend this capital before you attempt the check.

Add Spells to Your Spellbook

If you're a magus or wizard, you can spend 1 day of downtime to copy up to eight spells from other sources into your spellbook (see Spells Copied from Another's Spellbook or a Scroll). If you're an alchemist, you can use this option to add new formulae to your formula book. If you're a witch, you can use this option to add spells to your familiar. You may spend Magic toward the cost of copying spells.

Construct Buildings

You can use your downtime capital to create a building that suit your needs, such as a temple, guildhall, or mage tower. You construct a building out of component rooms that allow you to configure the building exactly how you want it (see Rooms and Teams).

How much capital you can spend per day is limited by the size of the settlement you're in (see Spending Limits). Once you've spent the total capital and time needed to finish your building, it's complete and you can use it immediately.

Craft Magic Items

The standard rules detail how to craft magic items. As magic item crafting and the downtime rules both use days as time increments for all but the cheapest potions and scrolls, you can spend days in the downtime system to craft magic items, with each downtime day counting as 8 hours of crafting time. You may spend Magic toward the crafting cost.

Craft Mundane Items

The Craft skill allows you to spend time creating mundane items such as armor, weapons, and alchemist's fire. The standard rules assume you spend a week on crafting, but give you the option to make progress by the day. If you use the downtime system, make your Craft checks by the day instead of by the week. The steps for crafting by day are as follows.

  1. Find the item's price in silver pieces (1 gp = 10 sp).
  2. Find the item's DC from Table: Craft Skills.
  3. Pay 1/3 of the item's price in gp for the raw material cost. You may also spend Goods toward this cost.
  4. Attempt an appropriate Craft check representing 1 day's worth of work. You may spend Labor to modify your check result, with 1 point of Labor adding 2 to your total.

If your check succeeds, multiply your check result by the DC and divide by 7. If this value equals or exceeds the price of the item in sp, then you complete the item. If the result × the DC equals double or triple the price of the item in silver pieces, then you've completed the task in 1/2 or 1/3 of the time. Other multiples of the DC reduce the time in the same manner.

If the value is less than the price, the check represents the progress you've made this day. Record the result of your check. Each downtime day you spend crafting, you make more progress until your total reaches the price of the item in silver pieces.

If you fail a check by 4 or less, you make no progress that day. If you fail by 5 or more, you ruin some of the raw materials and have to pay 1/10 of the original raw material cost again.

Earn Capital

You can spend 1 day of downtime earning capital. Depending on the nature of the work, this might require making some kind of check and paying an amount of gp. This work might be unskilled labor or skilled labor with a Craft or Profession skill. See Gaining Capital for more information.

Earn XP

If you've missed a campaign session or otherwise fallen behind in XP compared to the other characters, you can spend downtime adventuring to help catch up to the other PCs. Usually downtime adventures feature encounters that are much easier than you'd normally expect as part of a group. For example, a 5th-level character might clear zombies out of a crypt or assist some lower-level adventurers with a problem that's a little too difficult for them.

Spending 1 day of downtime adventuring earns you XP as if you had defeated an opponent whose CR was equal to your character level. For example, if you are a 3rd-level character, you would earn 800 XP. You do not earn any treasure or other capital for downtime adventuring.

If using this downtime activity would increase your XP above the highest XP value among all the PCs in your party, it increases your XP to that value instead; any XP earned beyond this amount is lost. This activity allows you only to catch up, not to get ahead.

Gather Information

Using the Diplomacy skill to gather information normally requires 1d4 hours to search for rumors and informants. When using the downtime system, you have three options for gathering information.

Standard Check: Once per day, you may spend 1d4 hours speaking with locals and attempt one check, as described in the Diplomacy skill. Doing so does not cost you any downtime, but the GM might rule that other time-consuming downtime activities take a penalty (such as a –4 on a skill check) or can't be undertaken.

Thorough Questioning: By spending 1 day of downtime, you can thoroughly converse with several knowledgeable or reliable contacts over the course of the day. You may attempt up to three Diplomacy checks to gather information. These checks can be for the same or different topics, and you can expend one of the rolls you haven't used yet to reroll a Diplomacy check you failed during this activity.

Influential Questioning: By spending 1 day of downtime and 1 point of Influence, you can attempt up to three Diplomacy checks, each with a +5 bonus. These checks can be for the same or different topics, and you can expend one of the rolls you haven't used yet to reroll a Diplomacy check you failed during this activity.

Heal Others

You can use downtime to help others rest and recover using the Heal skill. For long-term care, treating wounds, and treating disease, you can spend Labor to modify your check result. Each 1 point of Labor spent adds 2 to your check.

Long-Term Care: Spending a day of downtime on long-term care allows you to care for up to six patients that day.

Treat Wounds from Caltrops, Spike Growth, or Spike Stones: Spending a day of downtime allows you to treat up to 50 patients of this type. You may combine this option with the treat disease option, caring for up to 50 total patients per day.

Treat Deadly Wounds: Spending a day of downtime allows you to treat up to 8 patients of this type.

Treat Disease: Spending a day of downtime allows you to treat up to 50 patients of this type. You may combine this option with the treat wounds from caltrops option, caring for up to 50 patients total per day.

Lead Your Kingdom

If you are using the kingdom-building rules and have a leadership role in the kingdom, you must spend 7 days per month performing various leadership duties. In the downtime system, performing leadership duties for a day costs 1 day of downtime. You can't perform any other downtime activities on a day you perform kingdom leadership duties.

Promote a Business

You can spend 1 day of downtime to increase interest in a business, temple, organization, or other local fixture. You can also spend one type of capital, depending on how you want to promote the business. For example, if you want to promote a bakery, you can spend Goods giving out free pastries to people in town, Influence to get the mayor to visit the bakery and praise its food, Labor to hire workers to stand with signboards advertising the bakery, or Magic for a memorable illusion that draws people to the bakery.

The promotion increases activity at the site for 1d6 days. Choose one capital the building generates, then attempt a skill check for using skilled work to earn capital, using Diplomacy, Knowledge (local), or Spellcraft. Add 5 to your check result for every 1 point of Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic you spent to promote the business, then use the skilled work option to determine how many additional resources the business generates over the course of this increased activity. If you're promoting an organization without a physical building, each Good, Influence, Labor, or Magic adds only 2 to the check instead of 5 — it's harder to encourage people to be patrons of something they can't physically visit.

The business you promote with this downtime activity doesn't have to be one you own.

If the building or organization does not generate capital (such as charity that takes care of war orphans), the promotion generates either gp or Influence (your choice) .

Replace Your Animal Companion

If you lose or dismiss your animal companion, you can spend 1 day performing a ceremony to gain a new one. This ceremony requires 24 uninterrupted hours of prayer in the environment where the new companion typically lives (at the GM's discretion, traveling might add to the downtime requirement if there's no suitable environment near the settlement).

Replace Your Familiar

The standard rules allow you to replace a familiar if at least 1 week has passed since it was dismissed or lost. Doing so requires you to spend 1 day performing a specialized ritual to summon a new familiar. The ritual costs 200 gp × your wizard or witch level. You can spend Goods or Magic toward the ritual cost.

Recruit for an Organization

You can create and recruit for an organization that doesn't rely on a specific building. For example, you could may want to recruit employees (or minions) if you're a rogue and want to start your own gang of cutpurses or a cleric who wants to start a cult of followers. You create an organization out of component teams, so you can configure the organization exactly how you want it (see Rooms and Teams). How much downtime capital you can spend in a day is limited by the size of the settlement you're in (see Spending Limits). When you've spent the appropriate capital and time for your organization, it's complete and you can put it to work immediately.

Research a Spell

The standard rules allow you to perform spell research, either to create a new spell or learn an existing spell from another source. In the downtime system, the steps for spell research each day are as follows.

  1. Pay 100 gp × the spell's level for research costs and rare ingredients. You may spend Goods or Magic toward this cost.
  2. Determine the total days of progress required to complete the research, which is 7 × the spell level.
  3. Determine the spell research DC, which is 10 + twice the spell's level.
  4. Attempt a Spellcraft check and a Knowledge check (arcana for an arcane spell, religion for a divine spell) against the spell research DC. You can't take 10 on these checks. You may spend Magic to modify a check result, with 1 point of Magic adding 2 to your total (maximum +10). If both checks succeed, you make 1 day's progress toward completing the spell. When your days of progress equal the total number of days needed, the spell is completed and added to your spellbook or list of spells known.

If either or both spell research checks fail by 4 or less, you make no progress. For each check that fails by 5 or more, your research has led to poor results and you lose a day of progress toward completing the spell.

If you're an alchemist, you can use this downtime option to research a new extract formula. Instead of a Spellcraft check, attempt a Craft (alchemy) check. For Knowledge (arcana) checks, you may attempt a Knowledge (nature) check instead.

Research Facts and Lore

You can use downtime and capital to learn more about the campaign or the game world. This is similar to the gather information activity, except instead of looking for rumors and gossip in town, you are consulting with sages, perusing historical documents, or using magic to unearth information. Instead of a Diplomacy check, attempt one or more Knowledge checks appropriate to the intended subject. These checks can be for the same or different topics (and can use different Knowledge skills), and you can expend one of the rolls you haven't used yet to reroll a Knowledge check you failed during this activity. You have three options for researching information.

Thorough Research: By spending 1 day of downtime, you can thoroughly converse with several knowledgeable individuals or study several reliable sources over the course of the day. You can attempt up to three Knowledge checks to discover information.

Influential Research: By spending 1 day of downtime and 1 point of Influence, you may attempt up to three Knowledge checks, each with a +5 bonus.

Magical Research: By spending 1 day of downtime and 1 point of Magic, you may attempt up to three Knowledge checks, each with a +5 bonus.

Rest

You can use downtime to rest and recover. It is assumed that you spend 8 hours resting at night, which allows you to recover 1 hp per level per day and 1 point of ability damage for each affected ability score. If you spend a full day of downtime resting in bed, you recover another 1 hp per level per day and another 1 point of ability damage for each affected ability score.

Retrain

You can use your downtime to retrain (see Retraining). You may spend Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic toward this cost.

Run a Business

If you have a building and that building generates any kind of capital, you can spend 1 day of downtime working at your building—increasing its productivity by inspiring your employees to work harder, using your expertise to get more done, or using your fame to attract more customers. This counts as using downtime to earn capital (see ), but you gain a +10 bonus on your check.

The capital you generate must be a kind that your building can generate. For example, an inn that generates gp and Influence can generate only those two currencies using this downtime activity; you can't use it to generate Goods, Labor, or Magic just because you're personally running it for the day. You must earn capital acquired in this way as normal.

Scheme for an Upcoming Adventure

You can use downtime to prepare for an upcoming adventure or event. For example, if you know you have to crash the baron's fancy party in 2 days, you can spend downtime watching the baron's manor, investigating what clothing the servants will wear, and finding out which important guests are attending. This works like spending capital to boost checks, except you must spend 1 day of downtime, and each Good, Influence, Labor, or Magic you spend toward this purpose gives you a +2 bonus on one skill check (maximum +6). As with the spend capital option, the GM decides if your approach is reasonable for the check you're attempting. The bonus from this activity stacks with that from the spend capital to boost checks option (maximum +10 total). This bonus lasts for one check.

For example, by spending 1 day of downtime and 1 point of Goods, you gain an excellent understanding of the liveried servants' uniforms and add 2 to your Disguise check to disguise yourself as one of them. By spending 1 day of downtime and 1 point of Influence, you learn what famous trapsmith constructed the baron's vault and add 2 to your Disable Device check to open it.

Train an Animal

You can use the Handle Animal skill to train an animal. The rules for training assume the training period is continuous. However, you can break this training into smaller increments (allowing you to make progress on this training between adventures), but you must attempt a Handle Animal check for each training period, and the DC increases by 2. Failing the check means that training period doesn't count toward completing the training.

This use of downtime doesn't allow you to exceed the animal's normal training limitations. For example, spending downtime doesn't allow you to teach an animal more tricks than it could learn if you weren't using the downtime system.

Teach an Animal a Trick: This requires 7 days and a successful Handle Animal check at the end of the training period. You may spend Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic to modify your check result, with each 1 point of capital adding 2 to your total (maximum +10). The DCs and specific tricks are detailed on the Handle Animal page.

Train an Animal for a General Purpose: This sort of training can take several weeks, depending on the nature of the training. You may spend Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic to modify your check result, with each 1 point of capital adding 2 to your total (maximum +10).

Rear a Wild Animal: Depending on the maturation rate of the animal, this can take anywhere from weeks to months or even years. For simplicity's sake, interacting with the animal for an hour per day in a safe environment counts toward this training and doesn't require you to spend any downtime. As long as you maintain this daily contact, you need to succeed at only one Handle Animal check at the end of the rearing period. An interruption requires you to succeed at a check to continue the rearing (you may attempt this check once per day). The assumption is that you have a non-expert taking care of the animal's basic needs while you are away so it isn't neglected. If you know you will miss a day of this contact, you may spend 1 point of Influence or 1 point of Labor for each missed day to have a skilled animal handler rear the animal for the day, meaning your absence doesn't count as an interruption in the animal's training.

Managers

A manager is a competent employee qualified to run a business while you're gone, even for weeks or months at a time. a manager is authorized to make certain decisions about your property while you're away, such as paying tax collectors, banning cultists from your store, and handling emergency situations.

Having a manager delays capital attrition (Upkeep phase step 3) from 1 every 7 days to 1 every 14 days. As long as the manager's pay is up to date, having a manager look after your business prevents business attrition (see step 4 of the Upkeep phase).

Unlike a team, a manager requires daily wages paid in gp. It's customary to pay a manager in advance when you're going to be absent, or arrange to pay wages through a bank or accountant. If you trust the manager, you can even allow her to take wages out of your business's earnings or from money you've set aside for your building or organization.

It's a good idea to give a manager some means of contacting you while you're away, even just an address in a city near where you're adventuring. You might want to provide a magical means of contacting you (and leave funds set aside to pay for it) in case something requires your urgent attention.

Reading a Manager Stat Block

A manager stat block is organized as follows.

Wage: This gp value is the manager's daily wage. This wage is for handling normal day-to-day operation of your business, and doesn't include costs for exceptional services. For example, just because you pay your abbot a daily wage doesn't mean you can bring him on adventures to cast spells (in fact, most of his spells are probably used in the course of doing his job managing your Temple).

Skills: This indicates the main skills the manager has ranks in, allowing you or the GM to make skill checks for the manager if an event or encounter requires it. The manager might also have ranks in other skills that aren't relevant to employment duties. The managers here are examples; a specific manager you hire could have different class skills more closely suited to your business. a manager is typically a 3rd-level character with 3 ranks in the appropriate skills and the basic NPC ability score array, giving the manager a +7 or +8 for class skills and a +4 or +5 for non-class skills.

Many manager roles are similar to specific teams. For example, an Abbot is a Priest who is qualified to run a Temple or religious organization. The primary difference between an Abbot and Priest is that you pay the Abbot a wage to look after your building or organization while you're away, whereas the Priest might be just one of several people with similar duties in your organization. With the GM's approval, you may convert a team to an appropriate manager by paying the NPC (or NPCs) a wage, or vice versa.

You can select a cohort or notable follower to be a manager, but you still must pay a wage. Having a cohort or follower as a manager means you know the manager is loyal to you—it doesn't mean that she'll work for free while you're off adventuring.

Example Managers

The following managers are examples of individuals you can hire to manage a business or look after your building or organization.

Abbot

Wage 4 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Heal, Knowledge (local), Knowledge (religion)

An Abbot is divine spellcaster trained to take care of a Temple or religious organization and its members. She's typically a 3rd-level adept, cleric, druid, or oracle, with light armor (or no armor, if an adept) and a weapon appropriate to her faith.

Accountant

Wage 3 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Knowledge (local), Linguistics, Profession (accountant)

An Accountant maintains financial records and balances an organization's or building's budget. He's typically a 3rd-level expert and not a combatant, though he could be from any skilled class that makes good use of high mental ability scores.

Captain

Wage 5 gp/day

Skills Acrobatics, Diplomacy, Knowledge (geography), Profession (sailor)

A Captain is a master sailor who runs a shipping operation. She's typically a 3rd-level expert, rogue, or fighter. a Captain can be in charge of a mercantile organization, a pirate fleet, or a business that ferries people from port to port.

Doctor

Wage 5 gp/day

Skills Heal, Perception, Sense Motive, Survival

A Doctor is trained to treat all manner of maladies and injuries. He's typically a 3rd-level adept, cleric, druid, or oracle. An expert can make a suitable Doctor, but can heal and treat wounds and diseases with only mundane methods or the use of magic items. a Doctor is typically in charge of a Hospital or organization that provides medical care.

Guildmaster (Artisans' Guild)

Wage 3 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Craft (any one), Diplomacy, Profession (any one)

A artisans' Guildmaster is skilled at her art and capable of running a group of like-minded artisans. She's typically a 3rd-level bard, expert, rogue, or member of another skilled class. a Guildmaster handles the day-to-day duties of running an Artisan's Guild: basic administration, educating guild members, and working at her trade.

Guildmaster (Thieves' Guild)

Wage 5 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Bluff, Disable Device, Knowledge (local)

A thieves' Guildmaster manages a criminal organization. He's typically a 3rd-level bard, cleric, expert, rogue, or sorcerer. a Guildmaster runs the day-to-day operation of a Thieves' Guild: basic administration, training recruits, managing current operations, and devising new schemes.

Headmaster

Wage 3 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Knowledge (any two), Profession (any one)

A Headmaster manages a place of learning, such as a Bardic College, Magical Academy, or University. She's typically a 3rd-level alchemist, bard, expert, rogue, sorcerer, wizard, or witch. Running an establishment of higher learning includes basic administration, educating students, and ongoing research.

Innkeeper

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Diplomacy, Knowledge (local), Profession (any one)

An Innkeeper runs an establishment focused on hospitality. He's typically a 3rd-level commoner or expert, but could also be a retired fighter, rogue, or warrior. An Innkeeper sees to the day-to-day operation of an Inn, Tavern, hotel, restaurant, or exclusive private social club.

Lieutenant

Wage 4 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (engineering), Perception

A Lieutenant leads a unit containing Guards, mercenaries, or troops. She's typically a 3rd-level cavalier, fighter, or ranger, but could be a barbarian, bard, inquisitor, warrior, or member of any class devoted to martial combat. a Lieutenant manages troops assignments and needs, sees to their training, and participates in military operations.

Master Smith

Wage 4 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Craft (any one), Perception, Profession (any one)

A Master Smith oversees a productive business. He's typically a 3rd-level bard, expert, rogue, or member of another skilled class. a Master Smith runs the day-to-day operations of a production facility devoted to a particular trade, trains apprentices, and works on the more challenging and masterful creations being produced.

Partner

Wage 4 gp/day

Skills Bluff, Diplomacy, Knowledge (any one), Profession (barrister)

A Partner is a prominent leader in a barrister's office. She's typically a 3rd-level bard, expert, rogue, sorcerer, wizard, or member of another skilled class that depends on mental ability scores. a Partner sees to the organization's legal needs.

Sensei

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Acrobatics, Intimidate, Knowledge (history), Perception

A Sensei heads a Dojo or martial Monastery. He's typically a 3rd-level monk, but could have levels in any martial or Wisdom-based class. A Sensei sees to the training of students and manages day-to-day operations.

Smuggler

Wage 3 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Bluff, Knowledge (local), Sleight of Hand

A Smuggler is a merchant accustomed to performing her duties beneath the notice of authorities. She's typically a 3rd-level bard, expert, rogue, or member of any class devoted to subterfuge. A Smuggler might run a Black Market, illegal caravan, or ring of smuggling ships.

Stage Manager

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Disguise, Perform (any two)

A Stage Manager oversees an artistic organization or building devoted to the arts. He's typically a 3rd-level expert, but could instead be a bard, rogue, or member of any class with skills suiting the fine arts. A Stage Manager spends his day seeing to the operations of the theater, instructing performers, and promoting featured acts.

Steward

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Knowledge (local), Knowledge (nobility), Sense Motive

A Steward manages a large residential building like a Castle, Mansion, or Noble Villa. She's typically a 3rd-level adept, commoner, or expert. A Steward manages the day-to-day operations of an estate, coordinates the work of the servants and disciplines any whose performance is unsatisfactory, and ensures that the lords and ladies of the house want for nothing.

Underboss

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Appraise, Bluff, Intimidate, Knowledge (local)

An Underboss follows the direct orders of a crime boss or anyone running a violent criminal organization. He's typically a 3rd-level bard, cleric, expert, fighter, or rogue. An Underboss follows his superior's orders, maintains the organization's goals, and manages subordinates.

Warden

Wage 2 gp/day

Skills Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), Sense Motive

A warden oversees a Jail, dungeon, or other place where people are detained. She's typically a 3rd-level cleric, expert, fighter, inquisitor, warrior, or member of any class suited to combat and guile. a warden sees to the needs of the guards employed within the Jail as well as those of the prisoners', and monitors conditions within the facility.

Rooms and Teams

Many players want to run inns, found mercenary companies, build temples, or lead cabals of mages. The downtime system allows you to do this by presenting small constituent units: rooms for constructing buildings and teams for forming organizations.

A room can be as simple as a 10-foot-by-10-foot area surrounded by wooden walls, or as complex as a stone-walled guard tower with a heavy wooden gate. a team can be as simple as a few beggars or pickpockets, as skilled as a group of acolytes trained in the healing arts, or as dangerous as a band of veteran mercenary soldiers. The details of the room or team are left vague to allow you greater versatility—they provide the game mechanics for your building or organization, but you decide the layout or hierarchy that suits your aesthetics.

Each room and team costs one or more kinds of capital (gp, Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic). When you construct a building or create an organization, determine what rooms or teams you want, add up the gp, Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic prices for these rooms, and spend that capital to begin construction or start recruiting.

Constructing Buildings from Rooms: If you are constructing a building, you can connect these rooms in any way you see fit using normal doors and hallways, or fit them together without interior partitions into a large common space. Unless otherwise stated, each room includes a floor, ceiling, walls, furniture, doors, windows, and other details that are appropriate to the room's purpose in your building.

Example: A Common Room is a large area designed for use by many people at once. In a Fort, a Common Room has tables and chairs and functions as a mess hall for soldiers. In a Tavern or Inn, it has tables and chairs and is the main place for socializing and drinking. In a Temple, it has chairs or pews and is used for conducting worship services. In a Bardic College, it has chairs and music stands and is used for practicing performances.

Construction Examples

The following are examples of how you can construct your own Inn using rooms or create your own Thieves' Guild using teams. Many complete buildings and organizations are presented on pages 107–113.

Inn

Suppose you want to spend downtime constructing a friendly traveler's Inn. It needs a Bar so it can sell drinks, and a Kitchen so it can serve food. Guests need a place to eat and rooms to sleep in, so it must include a Common Room and a Lodging. To keep your guests' horses safe, it must include a Stall. By adding up all the Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic values in the Create and Time entries of the rooms' stat blocks, you get a total of 33 points of Goods, 3 points of Influence, 32 points of Labor, and 90 days. By spending that capital, after 90 days of construction time your inn is finished.

Alternatively, if you just wanted to purchase a completed Inn and the GM says one is available, you can add up the gp cost listed in the Create entries of the Inn's rooms and pay that amount to the current owner. For the friendly traveler's Inn described above, that total price is 1,390 gp.

Thieves' Guild

Suppose you want to create a network of thieves and spies in town. You need eyes and ears on the street, so you should include a Cutpurse team. You want people to be able to break into homes and steal valuables, so you should include a Robber team. To hide your wealth from the tax collector, you need a Bureaucrat team. By adding up all the Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic values in the Create and Time entries of the rooms' stat blocks, you get a total of 3 points of Goods, 11 points of Influence, 6 points of Labor, and 6 days. If you spend that capital, after 6 days of recruiting, your guild is ready to work.

Alternatively, if you wanted to just purchase an existing guild, with the GM's approval you can add up the gp prices for those teams and pay that amount to the current guildmaster. For the Thieves' Guild described above, the total price is 510 gp.

Exterior doors are good wooden doors with simple locks. Interior doors are simple wooden doors with no locks. You may install different locks by paying the normal price for locks.

You don't need to construct all of a building's rooms at once. The price of constructing a two-room building is the same whether you build them together or complete the first one and add the second one later.

Broken Rooms: If a room takes damage in excess of half its hit points (or is otherwise rendered sufficiently damaged by a downtime event or at the GM's discretion), it gains the broken condition. A room with the broken condition generates half the normal income. In general, repairing a broken room requires spending an amount of gp or other capital equal to half the price of constructing the room from scratch. Certain building events may have alternative prices for repairing rooms with the broken condition.

Entire buildings can also gain the broken condition. Treat the building as if each room in it had the condition, except you must repair the entire building at once rather than repairing rooms one at a time.

Creating Organizations from Teams: Unless otherwise stated, the people on a team have clothing, a small amount of personal gear appropriate to their line of work, and a place to live—in other words, lives outside of their involvement with you. You may outfit them with better gear and construct or purchase a place for them to live.

You don't need to add every team to your organization at once. The price for recruiting a team of beggars and a team of burglars is the same whether you recruit them together or recruit one and add the second team later.

The composition of a team is flexible and can change over time depending on the nature of your organization. For example, if your thieves' guild has Cutpurses and Robbers, some of them might get caught and jailed, but it is assumed your organization replaces them with individuals of similar skill. In the same way that you don't have to track routine maintenance on a building you own, replacing individuals who leave your organization is factored into the price of the team.

You can only recruit a team if the character levels of its individual members are equal to or lower than your Leadership score. Even if you don't have the Leadership feat, calculate your Leadership score as your character level + your Charisma modifier.

Unless otherwise noted, the members of a team are not adventurers and are unwilling to accompany you into dungeons and other deadly locations.

Example: An Acolyte is a low-level divine spellcaster. In a Cult, Acolytes are the lowest-ranked members of the group and handle most of the interactions with new converts. In a Thieves' Guild, they are responsible for patching up members of the guild after a robbery or gang war. In a Mercenary Company, they look after the spiritual needs and physical injuries of the soldiers.

Teams and Leadership: One advantage of having followers from the Leadership feat is that they increase the effect of Influence and Labor you spend in a settlement (see Using Followers). As the primary component of the price of recruiting teams is Influence, having followers in a settlement makes it easier to get the word out about the organization you want to build.

The people in your organization obey you because you pay them, or at least keep regular contact with them and direct their activities. Unlike with cohorts and followers gained from the Leadership feat (who are loyal toward you because of your reputation and behavior), if you're away from your organization for a long period of time, you might lose your connection with it. In the Upkeep Phase section, see Step 3—Determine Capital Attrition.

In addition to the ways to combat attrition mentioned in the Upkeep Phase section, recruiting your followers into your organization can help with this problem. You can automatically add followers to your organizations as you recruit teams. For every five of your followers who are also members of your organization, you gain a +1 bonus on the leadership check to avoid attrition. As most followers are low-level characters with NPC classes, most teams of followers aren't trained for combat and are usually recruited to be Acolytes, Bureaucrats, Craftspeople, Lackeys, and so on (see Teams).

Combining Rooms and Teams: This system allows you to construct a building that has no workers, create an organization that has no base of operations, or combine the two to make a fully staffed building or an organization with a headquarters. For example, if you build a Temple and recruit Acolytes in that settlement, you can have the Acolytes work at your temple. If the Temple has a place for the Acolytes to sleep, they can even live there. If you later want the Acolytes to go somewhere else or disperse, you still have the Temple and can use it for whatever purpose you see fit.

Reading a Unit Stat Block

The unit stat blocks are essentially the same for rooms and teams, and are organized as follows. Where an entry in a stat block would have no value (for example, a room that can't be upgraded from or into something else), that entry is omitted from the stat block.

Earnings: This entry indicates what bonuses the room or team gives to its building's or organization's checks made to generate capital. Buildings and organizations act like characters in that they can attempt a check each day to earn capital performing skilled work (without costing you any downtime). You must pay for capital earned in this way as normal.

Restrictions on Earnings

Whether a unit generates its listed capital depends on your intentions for the building or organization, and should follow common sense. For example, if you construct a building with a Bar, Common Room, and Kitchen, you might want to use it as a tavern or a headquarters for your adventuring party. If it's a tavern, it's open to the public and generates capital. Otherwise, it's a private building and doesn't generate capital because it's used by only you and your friends. If you start your own cult with Acolytes and Priests, you might decide they sell healing and generate income. If your thieves' guild has Acolytes, you might decide they only heal members of your guild, and therefore don't generate income.

If you intend for your building or organization to generate capital, you must explain to the GM how it does so. You can change the purpose of your building or organization (for example, renovating an old military barracks into an inn or turning your greedy cult into a generous one) and in doing so change the capital it generates. You should choose one idea and stick to it, however, as a business that's open to the public on an irregular basis makes less money, as does a business that frequently changes its purpose. The GM might reduce the capital buildings generate in such situations.

If the room or team's Earnings entry says "capital" and a number, it can contribute a bonus on the building's or organization's skilled work check for any type of capital (gp, Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic). If the Earnings entry lists specific types of capital, it can contribute a bonus on its building's or organization's skilled work checks only for capital of those types. You can apply each room's or team's bonus to any one listed type or capital each day or divide it among multiple listed types of capital. For example, an Alchemy Lab can generate only gp, Goods, or Magic, and not Influence or Labor. One day you could use all +10 of its bonus on the building's capital check to generate gp, on the next day you could use +5 on a check for generating gp and +5 on a check for generating Goods, and so on.

Most of the time, it's simplest and quickest to just apply all the gp bonuses from all the rooms in each of your buildings and take 10 on the roll. Other times, you might want to generate other types of capital to construct new rooms, recruit new teams, and make upgrades.

If you have multiple buildings or organizations in a settlement and they can generate the same kind of capital, you don't have to roll for them separately—you may add all their capital modifiers together and attempt one check for that kind of capital. If you spend a downtime day earning capital on your own, you may add your building and organization bonuses to your roll instead of rolling separately for yourself and each of your businesses or organizations.

For a room, the Earnings amount already subtracts the cost of having unskilled employees to do the basic work for you. For example, the Earnings listed for having a Bar already account for the wages of a bartender and servers. For a team, the Earnings amount assumes they are working at a building you own. If you don't provide a building for the team to work in or from, halve the Earnings for that team.

The description section of the unit stat block might list other benefits unrelated to the downtime system.

Example: The Inn example in the sidebar Construction Examples has a Bar, a Common Room, a Kitchen, a Lodging, and a Stall. The Bar gives gp or Influence +10; the Common Room gives gp or Influence +7; the Kitchen gives gp or Goods +4; the Lodging gives gp +12; and the Stall gives gp, Goods, or Labor +8. All of those rooms can earn gp, so if you want to earn gp, just add all the room bonuses together (total +41) and make a skilled work check for the Inn to see how much gp you earn. If you wanted to use the Bar's bonus to contribute to generating Influence and use the rest of the rooms' bonuses on gp, you'd attempt one skilled work check for Influence with a +10 modifier (the Bar's bonus) and another skilled work check for gp with a +31 modifier (the total bonuses from the Common Room, Lodging, and Stall).

Benefit (Rooms Only): This entry lists what non-downtime bonuses the room provides, such skill bonuses or changes to settlement modifiers (such as Corruption, Crime, and Danger). If a room provides a skill bonus, that bonus applies only when you're in the location specified. For example, just because you have a Ballroom in your castle doesn't mean you get its Perform bonus when you're in a dungeon.

The stat block doesn't list obvious benefits that aren't related to game mechanics. For example, a Bar allows you to sell drinks, a Kitchen allows you to serve food (either for your personal guests or to paying customers if the building is an Inn), and a Magical Repository allows you to research spells.

Create: This entry lists how much Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic are required to construct the room or recruit the team. It also includes a gp value for purchasing a completed room of that type or recruiting an existing team of that type.

Time: This entry indicates how long it takes to complete the room or recruit the team. You may divide the Time price for a room by 2, 3, or 4 by spending 2, 3, or 4 times its Labor price. You may divide the Time price for a team by 2, 3, or 4 by spending 2, 3, or 4 times its Influence price. You must be in the settlement at the start of the construction or recruitment period, but don't have to spend any of your downtime days to begin construction or recruitment. In effect, you have to be present only to give the order to begin.

If a team doesn't have a Time price, spending capital to recruit that team doesn't count as a downtime action.

Note that the Time prices for teams are for recruiting the team for long-term employment and don't reflect the availability of these kinds of NPCs for temporary work. For example, if you need to hire a 3rd-level cleric to cast lesser restoration, you don't have to spend 7 days of downtime recruiting a Priest team—you can just make standard spellcasting arrangements.

Size: If the unit is a room, this entry indicates a range of how many 5-foot squares are needed for a standard room of its type. For example, a Kitchen is 2–6 5-foot squares. If you need a larger room of this type, construct two rooms and join them. If you need a smaller room of this size, you can make it that smaller size for free. For example, if you only need a 5-foot-square Kitchen, you can construct one at the listed price, even though the smallest size listed is 2 5-foot squares.

If the unit is a team, this entry indicates how many people are needed for a standard team of its type. Typically the team is no smaller than 50% of this amount and no larger than 150% of this amount. If you need a larger team of this size, recruit two teams and combine them.

Upgrade: Some rooms and teams are variants of or improvements on others. You can change the room or team into the listed upgrade by spending the difference in both capital and time between the original and the new one. For example, if your building includes a Book Repository and you want to upgrade it to a Magical Repository, you can either spend 1 point of Goods, 1 point of Influence, 1 point of Labor, and 2 points of Magic, or spend 270 gp (the difference between the Create entry for a Book Repository and a Magical Repository). You must also spend 4 days (the Time difference between a Book Repository and a Magical Repository).

Pay the price only for types of capital that increase. For example, if you are converting Bunks into Lodging, you spend 3 points of Goods, 3 points of Labor, and 6 days; even though a Lodging costs less Influence, you don't regain any Influence for performing this upgrade.

You can't downgrade a room or team. With the GM's permission, you may repurpose any room or team into another room or team as if the change were an upgrade.

Description: a description of the unit follows the statistics, along with more detail about the benefits of having the unit.

Construction and Recruitment Delays

If the settlement's nature is contrary to the kind of building or organization you're trying to construct or create (such as a Black Market or Thieves' Guild in a settlement with low Crime and high Law settlement modifiers), the GM might decide that construction or recruitment takes 1d6 × 10% longer than normal (minimum 1 extra day) if you aren't monitoring the work.

You can shorten this extra time before or during the delay by spending 1 point of Influence, which reduces the additional time by 1d6 days (minimum 0 days of delay).

You can instead have a cohort monitor the work, or hire a competent employee to do so; either of these options completely prevents the delay.

Moving an Organization

You can move an organization to a different settlement by paying half the price of recruiting it. This price accounts for paying relocation expenses for your teams, hiring replacements for people unwilling to move, and so on. Arranging the movement of an organization usually takes 1d6 days per team in the organization; the time needed to actually move the teams is the amount of time it takes to travel from the old settlement to the new one. The organization provides only half its benefits during the time you are arranging the move, and none of its benefits while traveling to the new settlement.

Instead of moving an entire organization, you can move just some of the teams within that organization. For example, if your Thieves' Guild includes two Robber teams, you could move one of the teams to a different settlement by spending 2 points of Influence and 1 point of Labor (half the price of recruiting a Robber team in the new location). This otherwise works like moving an entire organization. You may add these teams to an existing organization in the new settlement or use them to create a new organization.

Rooms

You can use the following rooms to construct buildings.

Alchemy Lab

Earnings gp, Goods, or Magic +10

Benefit counts as an alchemist's lab (equipment)

Create 8 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor, 1 Magic (390 gp); Time 16 days; Size 8–16 squares

This room aids you when you're attempting Craft (alchemy) checks, researching new alchemist formulae, and performing similar alchemical tasks. Up to three people can use the room at a time.

Altar

Earnings Influence +3

Benefit counts as a permanent fixture dedicated to your deity for the purpose of consecrate and similar spells

Create 2 Goods, 1 Influence, 2 Labor, 1 Magic (210 gp); Time 4 days; Size 2–8 squares

This spiritual focal point has the iconography and materials required for a ceremony. a typical Altar takes the form of a stone altar, but it could also be a sacred pool, a sacrificial pyre, a collection of statuettes, or a similar sacred convergence.

Animal Pen

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +8

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–16 squares

Upgrades To Habitat

An Animal Pen houses animals that need more attention than horses and cattle. It could be used to house animals for food (like chickens or pigs), display (like song birds or reptiles), or protection (like dogs or large cats). One animal pen can support 1 Large, 2 Medium, 4 Small, or 8 Tiny or smaller creatures, providing them with water and shelter. Food is not provided.

Armory

Benefit provides for 1 Bunks or Guard Post, hastens donning armor

Create 9 Goods, 3 Influence, 6 Labor (390 gp); Time 16 days; Size 5–15 squares

An Armory stores a variety of armor and weapons, providing enough equipment to supply one Bunks or Guard Post with common equipment (the guards or soldiers leave their armor and weapons here, and you don't have to pay for individual equipment for them as long as this room is not broken). The room is typically supplied with medium armor and appropriate martial weapons for the guards or soldiers in the building. The Armory contains an array of helpful tools to allow you to don armor in the time it normally takes to don hastily.

Artisan's Workshop

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +10

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for one Craft skill

Create 9 Goods, 9 Labor (360 gp); Time 20 days; Size 8–16 squares

This specialist's workshop provides a variety of tools and materials for a particular art form, such as glassworking, gemcutting, or sculpting, which you choose when you build the room. Up to three people can use the room at a time.

Auditorium

Earnings gp or Influence +15

Benefit bonus on Perform checks

Create 19 Goods, 1 Influence, 25 Labor (910 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–100 squares

Upgrades From Ballroom

This large room is used for various artistic performances. It contains a stage, costumes, instruments, and seating for an audience. The superior acoustics and décor grant a +2 bonus on all Perform checks made in this room.

Ballroom

Earnings gp or Influence +10

Benefit bonus on Perform checks

Create 19 Goods, 19 Labor (760 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–60 squares

Upgrades To Auditorium; Upgrades From Common Room

This large open room is intended for dances, receptions, and other elaborate events. The superior acoustics and decor grant a +2 bonus on all Perform checks made in this room.

Bar

Earnings gp or Influence +10

Benefit bonus on Diplomacy checks to gather information

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 16 days; Size 10–20 squares

A Bar stores a selection of drinks and includes a counter for preparing them. After spending an hour with local people in this room, for the next 24 hours you gain a +1 bonus on Diplomacy checks you make to gather information in the settlement.

Bath

Earnings gp or Influence +3

Benefit bonus on Fortitude saves against disease

Create 3 Goods, 1 Influence, 2 Labor (130 gp); Time 8 days; Size 3–6 squares

Upgrades From Sauna

A Bath contains a single large bathtub or multiple smaller basins, along with a stove for heating water. After spending 1 hour in this room, you gain a +2 bonus on your next ongoing Fortitude save against disease.

Battle Ring

Earnings gp or Influence +15

Benefit contestant gains a bonus on Intimidate and performance combat checks

Create 18 Goods, 4 Influence, 16 Labor (800 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–100 squares

Upgrades To Sports Field

This enclosed field is used for some form of dangerous contest, from nonlethal sports like wrestling or boxing to lethal blood sports such as animal fights or gladiatorial combat. It includes seating for spectators, appropriate flooring (padded or sandy), and often some manner of barrier between the audience and combatants. Each day, the person in charge of the Battle Ring can grant one combatant a +2 bonus on Intimidate and performance combat checks. This benefit applies only within the settlement.

Bedroom

Earnings gp or Influence +3

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 20 days; Size 4–8 squares

A Bedroom provides comfort and privacy for one to two people, and typically features one large bed or two smaller beds. Many also have furnishings or features, such as chairs, wardrobes, chests, tables, or small fireplaces. a Bedroom might be the sleeping place of a building's owner or a comfortable room for rent.

Bell Tower

Earnings capital +1 (of a type the building already generates)

Create 11 Goods, 3 Influence, 7 Labor (450 gp); Time 28 days; Size 9–25 squares

This two-story room contains one or more bells suitable for warnings or music, along with bell pulls for operating the instruments from below. The bells can be heard up to 1 mile away.

Blood Spa

Source Champions of Corruption

Benefit temporary age penalty reduction

Create 10 Goods, 4 Influence, 7 Labor, 6 Magic (1,060 gp); Time 28 days; Size 4–8 squares

Upgrades From Bath

This room houses a sumptuous tub and alchemical piping that allow a villain to alleviate some of the effects of aging by bathing in the blood of a freshly killed humanoid of less than middle age. The corpse is suspended over the tub via ceiling clamps that can be recessed out of sight in the ceiling. Bathing for an hour in this room reduces any ability score penalties from advanced age by 1 for a duration of 1 week and makes the bather appear younger. Multiple treatments stack. Each corpse provides enough blood for only 1 treatment.

Book Repository

Earnings gp or Influence +8

Benefit bonus on Knowledge checks of one type

Create 8 Goods, 2 Influence, 7 Labor, 1 Magic (460 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–12 squares

Upgrades To Magical Repository

A Book Repository contains shelves upon shelves of books, in addition to chairs, desks, and tables for reading and studying. Most repositories contain books on a wide array of topics providing a general wealth of information, but some contain books focused on a specific topic. When you construct a Book Repository, select one Knowledge skill. If someone has a question relating to that Knowledge skill and is able to spend 1 hour researching in the Book Repository, she gains a +3 bonus on the Knowledge check to answer the question.

Brewery

Earnings gp or Influence +10

Create 9 Goods, 2 Influence, 7 Labor (380 gp); Time 24 days; Size 12–24 squares

A Brewery allows you to ferment or distill ingredients such as fruits and grain to create potent beverages.

Bunks

Earnings gp or Labor +8

Create 7 Goods, 4 Influence, 7 Labor (400 gp); Time 24 days; Size 15–35 squares

Upgrades To Lodging

Bunks provide housing and limited storage for up to 10 people. Though hardly private, this space typically includes beds or cots, linens, small chests with poor locks, and chamber pots. If this room is part of an Inn, the building is more of a flophouse or hostel than a traveler's hotel, which would have private rooms. If part of a Hospital, this room houses patients.

Burial Ground

Earnings gp or Influence +4

Benefit prevents or creates undead

Create 4 Goods, 3 Influence, 4 Labor, 1 Magic (350 gp); Time 8 days; Size 20–30 squares

Upgrades To Crypt

This somber plot of land is dedicated to the internment of the dead. Up to 20 Medium or smaller corpses can be buried here, their plots clearly marked by gravestones, statues, or other markers. For an additional 200 gp, this area can be consecrated as holy or unholy ground. a corpse buried in holy ground cannot be animated as an undead creature. A corpse buried in unholy ground has a 5% chance every month of reanimating as an uncontrolled zombie. If you upgrade a Burial Ground, the area retains the consecration effect.

Cell

Create 5 Goods, 4 Labor (180 gp); Time 16 days; Size 1–9 squares

This uncomfortable room can imprison 1 to 4 captives. It is typically nothing more than a stone room with a straw-lined floor, though some might have the barest of comforts, like cots or chamber pots. One wall is typically constructed of sturdy bars and a door affixed with a simple lock. You can install manacles or masterwork manacles at the normal price of those items.

Ceremonial Room

Earnings Capital +10

Benefit bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate checks (see below)

Create 16 Goods, 2 Influence, 15 Labor, 5 Magic (1,180 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–100 squares

Upgrades To Throne Room; Upgrades From Common Room

This is a large, open room for important events such as religious services, town meetings, and weddings. It often features an elevated area for the focus or leader of the event, and might have seats for others in attendance. A person leading or officially speaking at the event gains a +1 bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate checks to influence others at the event. This bonus ends when the event ends.

Classroom

Earnings capital +8

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 14 days; Size 5–20 squares

This small meeting place gives numerous attendees an unobstructed view of a single lecturer. Many classrooms contain seating for those in attendance, a lectern, and a display table or chalkboard.

Clockwork Shop

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +10

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for Craft (clockwork)

Create 9 Goods, 9 Labor (360 gp); Time 20 days; Size 8–16 squares

This workshop provides all of the precision tools and workstations required for creating delicate clockwork goods. Up to three people can use the room at a time.

Common Room

Earnings gp or Influence +7

Create 7 Goods, 8 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 10–30 squares

Upgrades To Ballroom, Ceremonial Room, Throne Room

This versatile open area has enough space for many people to use at once. a Common Room is typically furnished with benches, chairs, cushions, mats, pews, or stools, and might have tables.

Confessional

Benefit bonus on Stealth checks

Create 2 Goods, 3 Labor (100 gp); Time 4 days; Size 2–4 squares

This pair of tiny, linked rooms allows for private conversations. Alternatively, you may construct a hidden space that allows you to watch another room without being observed, such as through a peephole in a tapestry or mosaic. One side of this room provides a +4 bonus on Stealth checks to hide from creatures in the adjoining room. a Confessional can be constructed in a way that allows this bonus to apply to creatures in both sides or just in one.

Courtyard

Earnings capital +5 (of a type the building already generates)

Create 4 Goods, 5 Labor (180 gp); Time 24 days; Size 20–40 squares

This large, open area might be constructed to feature decorative landscaping or be a more utilitarian space for drills, meetings, or storage.

Crypt

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +5

Create 5 Goods, 3 Influence, 5 Labor, 2 Magic (490 gp); Time 16 days; Size 8–30 squares

Upgrades From Burial Ground

This space is dedicated to the storage of prominent corpses. Above ground this space might take the form of a tomb. The duration of spells that preserve or protect corpses (such as gentle repose) are doubled when cast on a corpse that remains in this room.

Defensive Wall

Create 5 Goods, 2 Influence, 5 Labor (260 gp); Time 12 days; Size 20–40 squares

This simple wooden wall, fence, or hedge surrounds your structure and provides a modicum of security. It is no taller than 10 feet, includes a single gate with a simple lock, and can be scaled with a DC 14 Climb check. It can be constructed as a stone wall — increasing the height by up to 10 feet and the Climb DC to 20 — by doubling the price. If combined with a Guard Post, this can be a walkable wall with a parapet.

Dock

Earnings gp, Goods, Influence, or Labor +12

Create 7 Goods, 2 Influence, 6 Labor (320 gp); Time 20 days; Size 10–30 squares

This is a series of walkways and sturdy posts used to safely moor a water vessel such as a boat or ship. If attached to Storage, it allows you to easily move cargo to and from the water.

Dojo

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +8 Benefit counts as a training facility for training or retraining

Create 7 Goods, 1 Influence, 7 Labor (310 gp); Time 20 days; Size 15–30 squares

This open area is used for practicing combat or other physical skills. If used for combat training, it includes humanoid-shaped training dummies or silhouettes for target practice. Most Dojos include simple floor mats or straw pallets to cushion falls, plus racks containing nonlethal versions of standard weapons. If used by a Thieves' Guild, instead of combat the Dojo might instead focus on evasion training, picking locks, and disabling traps. You can use a Dojo to train up to 10 people at a time. It can be used as Bunks, though it is much less comfortable than using actual beds or cots.

Drawbridge

Create 8 Goods, 2 Influence, 5 Labor (320 gp); Time 6 days; Size 4–8 squares

This retractable bridge spans a pit, moat, or similar danger, allowing you to control access to an area. You can raise or lower the bridge by spending a full-round action to operate the mechanisms constructed on either side of the span. When raised, the bridge creates a wooden barrier (hardness 5, 40 hit points). If the Drawbridge is destroyed, it can be rebuilt in the same place for half the initial construction price.

Escape Route

Create 9 Goods, 9 Labor (360 gp); Time 16 days; Size 6–12 squares

Upgrades From Secret Room

This is a hallway or tunnel leading to a hidden exit from the building. The exit door is typically a simple wooden door with an average lock (Disable Device DC 20 to open). Either or both ends of the hallway can be secret doors (Perception DC 20 to notice).

Execution Yard

Source Champions of Corruption

Earnings Influence +10

Benefit bonus on Intimidate checks

Create 8 Goods, 2 Influence, 10 Labor (420 gp); Time 24 days; Size 20–40 squares

Upgrades From Courtyard

This open area is used to host public executions. The execution device, such as a headsman's block or gallows, occupies a dais in the yard's center. Surrounding it are viewing galleries for guests of assorted status and plenty of standing room for lower-class rabble. Gibbets or pikes around the yard display the condemned, granting a +3 bonus on Intimidate checks within the settlement to whoever publicly ordered the execution.

False Front

Earnings gp or Goods +2

Benefit bonus to Perception and Sense Motive DCs

Create 4 Goods, 1 Influence, 4 Labor (190 gp); Time 12 days; Size 10–20 squares

Upgrades To Storage and Storefront (see below)

This simple, nondescript business uses an innocuous front to hide criminal dealings. It might appear to be a low-quality pawnshop or ill-stocked market. It has the bare necessities for functioning as the kind of business it pretends to be, but its true purpose is to conceal the nature of the building—typically a criminal enterprise or secret meeting place, such as a cult's sanctuary or a den of thieves. The room includes a secret door leading to the rest of the building. The room increases Perception and Sense Motive DCs by 5 for those trying to notice unusual activity or determine whether the building is what it seems. Since a False Front contains both a false Storefront and false display area, its space can be upgraded to both Storage and a Storefront simultaneously (or upgraded to just one, leaving the remaining area unused).

Farmland

Earnings gp or Goods +10

Create 15 Goods, 15 Labor (600 gp); Time 20 days; Size 60–100 squares

This large swath of fertile land is used for farming or fodder for livestock. The price for this room includes clearing the land, fertilizing the soil, and so on. At the GM's discretion, you might discover a plot of available land that automatically counts as a Farmland at no cost.

Forge

Earnings gp or Goods +10

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for smithing skills

Create 9 Goods, 1 Influence, 8 Labor (370 gp); Time 20 days; Size 8–16 squares

A Forge includes a hearth, an anvil, a slack tub, metalworking tools, and other appropriate materials for shaping iron and other metals. A Forge counts as masterwork artisan's tools for up to three people working on metalworking skills such as Craft (armor) and Craft (weapons).

Game Room

Earnings gp +10 (see below)

Benefit Crime +1, Danger +10 (see below)

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 10–20 squares

A Game Room has tables for gambling or other forms of gaming, and is often used to make wagers on blood sports or other illicit activities. The listed Earnings includes illegal gaming. If your building allows only legal gaming (whether recreational or using money), the Earnings are gp +5 (not +10) and the Benefit is Crime +0, Danger +0.

Garden

Earnings gp or Goods +8

Create 5 Goods, 4 Labor (180 gp); Time 12 days; Size 10–20 squares

Upgrades To Greenhouse

This area of carefully tended soil is fit for growing plants that require greater attention than crops, though you can use it to grow food crops if you choose.

Gatehouse

Benefit defenders get bonus on initiative and Perception checks

Create 15 Goods, 3 Influence, 12 Labor (630 gp); Time 40 days; Size 8–12 squares

Upgrades From Gauntlet, Guard Post

This defensive structure prevents access to a building. It is normally arranged so defenders have a clear line of sight to all room entrances or a clear view of all approaches to the building. It includes a strong wooden door with a good lock. You can improve this to an iron door for 500 gp. You can add a wooden portcullis for 500 gp or an iron portcullis for 1,000 gp. For an additional 80 gp, you can also count this room as a Gauntlet, allowing defenders to fall back and trap intruders here. You can construct this room in a tower layout (at no additional cost), which includes a second story that also counts as a Gatehouse. The listed price includes the cost of having unskilled employees as guards (1st-level commoners or experts with uniforms, but no armor or weapons). If the building has an Armory, these employees are armed and armored, but still mostly for show. If you want trained guards who can defend against dangerous intruders, hire professional guards or recruit a team of Guards or Soldiers. You can use a Gatehouse as a Tollbooth, which provides the same Earnings (gp or Goods +4). Any defender using the Gatehouse's defenses gains a +1 bonus on initiative checks and on Perception checks against intruders at the Gatehouse.

Gauntlet

Benefit defenders get improved cover

Create 4 Goods, 4 Labor (160 gp); Time 10 days; Size 4–8 squares

Upgrades To Gatehouse

This is an area with murder holes or similar defenses that give defenders an advantage when attacking or spying upon intruders. It has good wooden doors with simple locks to allow defenders to trap invaders inside. Any defender using the Gauntlet's defenses has improved cover against intruders in the Gauntlet, though these defenses limit what attacks the defenders can make. For example, a defender can shoot through a murder hole with a spell, bow, or crossbow, or can pour boiling water through it, but she can't attack through it with an axe.

Greenhouse

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +12

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 10–20 squares

Upgrades From Garden

This garden is protected by glass and has its interior climate deliberately regulated. Delicate or exotic plants raised in this area grow larger and healthier than in a normal garden. Certain types of rare plants can be raised only in a Greenhouse.

Guard Post

Earnings gp or Goods +4

Benefit defenders get a bonus on initiative and Perception checks

Create 7 Goods, 2 Influence, 6 Labor (320 gp); Time 20 days; Size 6–10 squares

Upgrades From Tollbooth; Upgrades To Gatehouse

This defensive structure prevents access to a building. It is normally arranged so defenders have a clear line of sight to all room entrances or a clear view of all approaches to the building. You can construct this room in a tower layout (at no additional cost), which includes a second story that also counts as a Guard Post. The listed price includes the cost of having unskilled employees as guards (1st-level commoners or experts with uniforms, but no armor or weapons). If the building has an Armory, these employees are armed and armored, but still mostly for show. If you want trained guards who can defend against dangerous intruders, hire professional guards or recruit a team of Guards or Soldiers. Any defender using the Guard Post's defenses gains a +1 bonus on initiative checks and on Perception checks against intruders at the Guard Post.

Habitat

Earnings gp or Influence +12

Create 18 Goods, 3 Influence, 17 Labor (790 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–60 squares

Upgrades From Animal Pen, Stall

A Habitat houses animals. Unlike a Stall or Hatchery, a Habitat provides comfortable lodging for exotic or rare creatures. This room contains cages and walled chambers for the resident creatures, with at least one wall constructed of bars or windows to allow visitors to observe the creatures. a Habitat built to house birds is often constructed with tall poles and netting to keep the creatures from flying away.

Hatchery

Earnings gp or Goods +5

Create 4 Goods, 1 Influence, 3 Labor (170 gp); Time 10 days; Size 2–6 squares

A Hatchery is used for nesting and hatching egg-laying creatures such as birds, lizards, owlbears, or dragons. Alternatively, it can be used for fish, shellfish, or other aquatic egg-laying creatures. This room might be on the roof to allow flying creatures to come and go, or might be connected to the building on ground level. It contains cages and soft bedding to cradle the eggs, and might contain a small wood-burning stove to keep the eggs warm if parent animals aren't available.

Infirmary

Earnings gp or Influence +8

Benefit counts as a healer's kit (see below)

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 6 Labor, 1 Magic (370 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–12 squares

An Infirmary is used for treating injured and sick people. It contains beds or cots, a wash basin, and medical supplies. This counts as having a healer's kit for up to two healers at a time. As long as the building doesn't have the broken condition, you don't need to track individual uses of these healer's kits.

Kitchen

Earnings gp or Goods +4

Create 4 Goods, 4 Labor (160 gp); Time 12 days; Size 2–6 squares

A Kitchen is used to prepare food. It contains a stove, sink, and small pantry with basic cooking tools and supplies. a Kitchen for a business that serves food, such as an Inn, probably also has Storage just for foodstuffs.

Labyrinth

Earnings gp or Influence +5

Create 15 Goods, 15 Labor (370 gp); Time 30 days; Size 40–100 squares

A Labyrinth is a walled maze, hedge maze, or simple tiled pattern on the ground that those in need of tranquility can walk for quiet meditation.

Laundry

Earnings gp or Goods +3

Benefit bonus on Fortitude saves against contracting disease

Create 3 Goods, 3 Labor (120 gp); Time 8 days; Size 2–6 squares

A Laundry contains a large vat for soaking clothes, a cauldron to heat water, washboards, drying lines, and racks and bins for dry clothes. This might be an outside area adjacent to a building. Employees and regular users of a Laundry gain a +1 bonus on Fortitude saves to resist contracting a disease while they're in the settlement.

Lavatory

Benefit Bonus on Fortitude saves against contracting disease

Create 3 Goods, 3 Labor (120 gp); Time 4 days; Size 1–4 squares

Upgrades From Shack

A Lavatory includes up to four 5-foot-by-5-foot private rooms for dealing with biological functions. If a building doesn't have a Lavatory, people in it must go elsewhere for this sort of activity. Depending on the building and settlement, a Lavatory might be an outhouse, a closet with a chamber pot, or a stool connected to an external system such as a cesspit or pig trough. If the building has a Sewer Access, you can automatically connect all Lavatories in the building to the settlement's sewer system. The sanitation improvement from having a Lavatory mean residents, guests, employees, and others who frequent the building gain a +2 bonus on Fortitude saves to resist contracting a disease while in the settlement.

Leather Workshop

Earnings gp or Goods +10

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for leatherworking skills

Create 7 Goods, 1 Influence, 7 Labor (310 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–10 squares

This workshop includes a sturdy table, stool, vats, drying racks, and tools designed for turning raw hides into leather. The Leather Workshop counts as masterwork artisan's tools for up to three people creating leather goods with skills such as Craft (leather) and Craft (shoes).

Lodging

Earnings gp +12

Create 10 Goods, 1 Influence, 10 Labor (430 gp); Time 30 days; Size 20–35 squares

Upgrades From Bunks

This area is subdivided into smaller chambers and provides private housing and limited storage for up to 10 people. Each chamber typically includes one or two small beds, linens, a chamber pot, and a small table and chair. The door to the chamber is a simple wooden door with a simple lock. You may upgrade individual locks by paying the price difference between a simple lock and the desired lock.

Magical Repository

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +12

Benefit bonus on Knowledge (arcana), Spellcraft, and spell research checks

Create 9 Goods, 3 Influence, 8 Labor, 3 Magic (730 gp); Time 20 days; Size 4–12 squares

Upgrades From Book Repository

A Magical Repository is similar to a Book Repository, but specific to the study of the arcane arts. It contains shelves of books, comfortable chairs, and tables for studying and for scribing notes and scrolls. If you construct this room from scratch, it grants someone who studies there for 1 hour a +3 bonus on a Knowledge (arcana) check to answer a question. If you upgrade a Book Repository into this room, you either keep the original Book Repository's bonus on Knowledge checks or change its skill to Knowledge (arcana). An hour of study in this room also grants a +3 bonus on Spellcraft checks. The room grants an additional +1 bonus on Knowledge (arcana) and Spellcraft checks for spell research (see Research a Spell) and crafting magic items.

Mill Room

Earnings gp or Goods +8

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 20 days; Size 20–30 squares

A Mill Room contains a mechanism to process grain, foodstuffs, and other raw materials. Most simple mills are powered by hand, but those powered by horses or other beasts of burden require a stable, those powered by water require running water for the water wheel, and those powered by wind require a tower.

Nursery

Earnings gp or Influence +6

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 14 days; Size 8–16 squares

A Nursery is used to care for infants and children. It contains cribs and beds for children, toys for their entertainment, a table for changing, and cabinets for supplies.

Observation Dome

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +5

Benefit bonus on Knowledge (geography), Knowledge (nature), and Knowledge (planes) checks

Create 8 Goods, 9 Labor, 1 Magic (440 gp); Time 20 days; Size 10–20 squares

This elevated room is open to the sky, has a skylight, or has a retractable roof to allow you to observe the passing of celestial bodies. An Observation Dome includes shelves containing records and notes, a telescope, and other devices dedicated to celestial study. If someone spends 1 hour researching in the Observation Dome, she gains a +2 bonus on Knowledge (geography), Knowledge (nature), and Knowledge (planes) checks to answer a question about the heavens.

Office

Create 3 Goods, 3 Labor (120 gp); Time 8 days; Size 2–5 squares

Upgrades From Storage

This simple room includes a door with a simple lock, a chair, and a large desk that has two drawers with simple locks. An Office affords its user privacy and a refuge from other activity in the building.

Pit

Earnings gp or Labor +1

Create 1 Goods, 1 Labor (40 gp); Time 2 days; Size 1–5 squares

This is a place to dump things no longer needed. It can be used to contain refuse, dangerous waste, and piles of junk, or as a mass graveyard, communal latrine, or crude surface well. a typical pit is 5–15 feet deep with steep sides.

Printer

Earnings gp, Goods, Influence, or Labor +8

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for writing and printing skills

Create 9 Goods, 2 Influence, 7 Labor (380 gp); Time 20 days; Size 5–16 squares

Upgrades From Scriptorium

This specialized workshop contains a printing press, storage for paper, and drying racks for finished books and pamphlets. Up to three people can use the room at a time.

Reliquary

Earnings gp or Influence +5

Benefit bonus on Knowledge (religion) checks relating to its contents

Create 4 Goods, 4 Labor, 1 Magic (260 gp); Time 12 days; Size 1–4 squares

Upgrades To Vault

A Reliquary is built to securely store religious artifacts, and dedicated to a specific deity or philosophy. It contains shelves to house the items, special display cases to protect them, and sometimes chairs and tables to allow study. It's secured by a strong wooden door or grating with a good lock. Unlike a Vault, a Reliquary is intended to allow people to observe its contents. When stocked with relics appropriate to the chosen deity or philosophy, the room grants a +1 bonus on Knowledge (religion) checks relating to the history, powers, and purpose of those relics.

Sanctum

Benefit bonus on one Will save

Create 2 Goods, 1 Influence, 1 Labor, 1 Magic (190 gp); Time 6 days; Size 1–4 squares

This is a basic room with simple and pleasing decorations, clean lines, and a calming environment perfect for meditation, prayer, and solitude. a person who spends at least 4 hours in a Sanctum doing nothing other than praying or meditating gains a +1 bonus on Will saves. This bonus ends once the person leaves the settlement or after the first time she attempts a Will save.

Sauna

Earnings gp or Influence +3

Benefit bonus on disease and negative level recovery saves

Create 3 Goods, 3 Labor (120 gp); Time 8 days; Size 2–5 squares

Upgrades To Bath

This simple room contains benches, a central source of heat, stones, and a container of water with a ladle to help produce steam. Using a Sauna for an hour grants a person a +1 bonus on saving throws to overcome ongoing diseases (but not on saves to resist contracting diseases) and a +1 bonus on saving throws to recover from negative levels. This bonus goes away after 24 hours.

Scriptorium

Earnings gp, Goods, Influence, Labor, or Magic +5

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for writing skills

Create 7 Goods, 2 Influence, 6 Labor (320 gp); Time 16 days; Size 5–16 squares

Upgrades To Printer

A Scriptorium is where scribes do their work. It contains chairs and writing desks, as well as ink, paper, and other supplies needed to create or copy written works. Up to three people can use the room at a time for scribing scrolls or using Craft (calligraphy) or Profession (scribe).

Scrying Room

Earnings gp or Influence +2

Benefit increases the DC of scrying effects

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor, 3 Magic (550 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–16 squares

A Scrying Room is built to be a quiet place for scrying, seances, and similar divinations. It contains a table, chairs, and either a pool of water (at no additional cost) or a suitable focus object for a scrying spell (for an additional 1,000 gp). A caster using scrying, locate creature, or a similar targeted divination from here increases the spell's DC by 1.

Secret Room

Create 5 Goods, 6 Labor (220 gp); Time 16 days; Size 6–10 squares

Upgrades From Vault; Upgrades To Escape Route

This is either a room or a passage connecting two rooms in the building. The access to this space is controlled by a secret door (DC 20). A passage can have secret doors at both ends or a normal door at one end and a secret door at the other. If it's a room, it is typically used to hide someone or something you don't want discovered. If it's a passage, it's typically used for clandestine travel within the building, often for the purpose of smuggling or spying. For every 500 extra gp you spend, you can improve one secret door in the building to a well-hidden secret door (DC 30).

Sewer Access

Create 2 Goods, 1 Influence, 2 Labor (110 gp); Time 4 days; Size 4–6 squares

A Sewer Access might be a tunnel or room, or something as simple as a sturdy trap door in the floor. Constructing it requires a settlement with a sewer or septic system, and connects some part of the building to that system. You can use this as an Escape Route, but only to get to and from the sewer. The door to the sewer is a strong wooden door with a good lock. For an additional 500 gp, it has an iron door instead. If you have a Lavatory and Sewer Access, you may automatically connect the Lavatory to the sewer with indoor plumbing.

Sewing Room

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +10

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for one Craft skill

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 6–12 squares

A Sewing Room is used for designing heraldry and making cloth garments, tapestries, blankets, carpets, linens, and other textiles. It contains a loom; a spinning wheel; tapestry frames; shelves for fabric; worktables; and tools for spinning, weaving, and sewing. Up to three people can use the room at once; gaining the benefit of masterwork artisan's tools for skills such as Craft (cloth) and Craft (clothing), and for related skills such as Craft (baskets).

Shack

Create 3 Goods, 2 Labor (100 gp); Time 3 days; Size 2–4 squares

Upgrades To Lavatory, Storage

This no-frills wooden shelter contains a simple table, pallet bed, and stool. One person can build a shack with simple tools and basic materials. For an additional 1 point of Goods and 2 points of Labor, you can construct a brick or stone hut instead of a wooden shack.

Sitting Room

Earnings Influence +4

Benefit bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), and Perform checks

Create 12 Goods, 12 Labor (480 gp); Time 24 days; Size 6–10 squares

This is a room used for meeting and entertaining in a relaxed, comfortable setting, such as a den, dining room, or smoking room. It has furnishings appropriate to its function (chairs for a sitting room, table and chairs for a dining room, and so on). By spending an hour conversing with guests in a social manner, the host of the room gains a +1 bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), and Perform checks to influence or learn about those guests for the next 24 hours.

Sports Field

Earnings gp or Influence +10

Create 17 Goods, 3 Influence, 18 Labor (790 gp); Time 20 days; Size 40–100 squares

Upgrades From Battle Ring

This outdoor area is used for jousting, athletics, war games, and other sports. a Sports Field contains a playing area, seats for spectators and equipment for one type of game.

Stall

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +8

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 16 days; Size 6–16 squares

Upgrades To Habitat

A Stall is a place to keep 1–2 horses or other Large domestic animals. It contains gates, feed troughs, feed, and straw.

Statue

Earnings gp or Influence +1

Create 1 Goods, 2 Labor (60 gp); Time 2 days; Size 1–9 squares

This area contains a statue, fountain, or other large decoration. If it has religious significance, it might serve as a shrine. The listed cost and time are only to install a completed wood, bronze, or stone feature — they don't include the cost and time to create the feature in the first place, but it must be installed to produce Earnings.

Storage

Earnings gp +2

Create 3 Goods, 3 Labor (120 gp); Time 8 days; Size 4–8 squares

Upgrades From False Front, Shack; Upgrades To Office, Vault

Storage is any room used to store objects, keeping them out of the way for later use. Most Warehouses are just multiple Storage rooms built into a single building. A low-cost shop may allow its customers to browse items in the Storage area. A door to a Storage room includes an average lock.

Storefront

Earnings capital +5 (of a type the building already generates)

Create 5 Goods, 1 Influence, 3 Labor (190 gp); Time 12 days; Size 2–4 squares

Upgrades From False Front

This is a simple storefront, holding a wooden counter, a ledger, shelves, and other necessities to run a business.

Summoning Chamber

Earnings Magic +3

Benefit bonus on Charisma, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Knowledge (planes) checks

Create 11 Goods, 4 Influence, 10 Labor, 5 Magic (1,040 gp); Time 28 days; Size 6–16 squares

A Summoning Chamber is used to perform magical rituals to conjure outsiders. It contains a well-drawn, nearly complete magic circle on the floor—which you can complete with just a few chalk marks — suitable for use with magic circle spells, planar binding spells, and so on. A person who uses a Summoning Chamber gains a +3 bonus on Knowledge (planes) checks relating to a creature being called or summoned, and a +3 bonus on Charisma checks, Diplomacy checks, and Intimidate checks to influence or bargain with a creature called or summoned here.

Throne Room

Earnings Influence +15

Benefit bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, and Intimidate, Knowledge (local), and Perform checks

Create 25 Goods, 5 Influence, 25 Labor, 5 Magic (1,650 gp); Time 40 days; Size 40–80 squares

Upgrades From Ceremonial Room, Common Room

A Throne Room is used to receive important visitors, such as nobles. The room contains a throne, various decorations, and a few seats for visitors. By spending an hour conversing with visitors, the host of the room gains a +1 bonus on Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), and Perform checks to influence or learn about those guests for the next 24 hours.

Tollbooth

Earnings gp or Goods +4

Create 2 Goods, 1 Influence, 2 Labor (110 gp); Time 6 days; Size 1–5 squares

Upgrades To Guard Post

A Tollbooth is a small shelter designed to restrict movement on a road or bridge so the owner can collect fees from travelers. If this room is built near a settlement, it requires 1 point of Influence per day to maintain — or might be illegal, depending on the settlement.

Torture Chamber

Benefit bonus on Intimidate checks

Create 7 Goods, 3 Influence, 5 Labor (330 gp); Time 20 days; Size 6–16 squares

This grim room is used for interrogation as well as torture and other morally questionable acts. It contains structures to bind humanoids and various implements designed to inflict pain and discomfort. Interrogators in this room gain a +3 bonus on Intimidate checks to influence captives.

Trap

Benefit see below

Cost see below; Time see below Size 1–4 squares

This can be a specific room in a building or an augmentation to another room. A Trap room might appear empty or it might be decorated to appear to be harmless in order to lure a target into the trap. A Trap costs are explained in Mechanical Trap Costs and the following sections, and building one uses the crafting rules, though you may spend Goods and Labor toward this cost.

Trophy Room

Earnings gp or Influence +5

Create 6 Goods, 1 Influence, 5 Labor (250 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–20 squares

This is a place to hang trophies from your adventures, such as stuffed monster heads, rare paintings, strange statues, and old magic items you don't need any more. Because of the display cases and clutter, this room isn't much good for anything else, though it might include chairs or benches to allow people to sit while they admire your treasures. If you want to use your trophies to decorate another room instead of placing them in their own room, construct the Furnishings augmentation instead. A Museum makes money by charging visitors or sponsors to view items like these.

Vault

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–8 squares

Upgrades From Reliquary, Storage; Upgrades To Secret Room

This is a secure room designed to keep out intruders. The access to this space is controlled by an iron door with a good lock. If you upgrade this room to a Secret Room, the door retains its material and lock and also becomes a secret door.

War Room

Benefit bonus on mass combat and skill checks while scheming

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 4–12 squares

This is a room for planning military maneuvers, plotting grand heists, or providing briefings. It contains a large central table with plenty of chairs, maps, and figures to simulate troops and structures. When it's used for planning a battle, your army gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls and morale checks for their next battle within 24 hours. To grant the army this bonus, the army's commander must be present at the planning meeting for the battle or you must have some way of communicating these instructions to the commander. When used to scheme for an upcoming adventure, a War Room allows you to use the scheme's planning bonus on two skill checks instead of one.

Workstation

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +8

Benefit counts as masterwork artisan's tools for one Craft or Profession skill

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 16 days; Size 8–16 squares

This includes a table, chair, and appropriate masterwork artisan's tools for one Craft or Profession skill you choose when you build the room. For example, if intended for a carpenter, it has clamps, saws, nails, hammers, and a sturdy worktable. Up to three people can use the room at a time.

Room Augmentations

Augmentations modify a room to be more productive, durable, or useful. Augmentations are permanent and can't be removed. If you upgrade a room you have augmented, the augmentation carries over to the upgrade, but the augmentation's cost isn't considered when you look at the difference between the base and upgrade room.

You can put more than one augmentation in a room, as long as they aren't the same augmentation.

Fortification (Augmentation)

Benefit increases room's durability

Create 8 Goods, 7 Labor (300 gp); Time 30 days; Size As original room

This upgrade can be applied to any room, reinforcing walls, improving doors, and treating or replacing flammable materials. Upon buying this upgrade, the room's walls have their hardness increased by +2, the doors are improved to strong wooden doors (hardness 5, hit points 20), and walls and floors gain fire resistance 5. This upgrade doesn't affect items within the room (for example, upgrading a Book Repository affects the structure, not the books within it).

Furnishings (Augmentation)

Earnings +5 on the room's check to generate capital

Create 9 Goods, 6 Labor (300 gp); Time 20 days; Size as original room

This upgrade adds fancy furnishings to one room, such as wooden paneling, marble floors, fine ceramic teacups, lifelike paintings, and canopies for beds. The decoration is appropriate to the nature of the room and building. For example, if applied to a Bar frequented by soldiers, it includes patriotic heraldry and placards memorializing war heroes.

Trap (Augmentation)

Adding a Trap augmentation to a room costs the same as adding a dedicated Trap room; see the Trap room.

Teams

You can recruit the following teams and combine them to create a variety of organizations.

Acolyte

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +4

Create 2 Goods, 2 Influence, 2 Labor, 3 Magic (440 gp); Time 3 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades To Priest, Sage

An Acolyte is a newly trained divine spellcaster, sufficient for tending to the sick or advising on religious matters. An Acolyte is typically a 1st-level adept, cleric, druid, or oracle, with light armor (or no armor if an adept) and a weapon appropriate to her faith.

Apprentice

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +4

Create 2 Goods, 2 Influence, 1 Labor, 4 Magic (520 gp); Time 3 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades To Mage, Sage

An Apprentice is a newly-trained arcane spellcaster, sufficient for helping with magical rituals, generating flashy effects, or advising on magical matters. An Apprentice is typically a 1st-level bard, sorcerer, summoner, witch, or wizard.

Archers

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +6

Create 4 Goods, 3 Influence, 7 Labor (310 gp); Time 4 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades To Elite Archers; Upgrades From Soldiers

Archers are soldiers trained to use projectile weapons. They are typically 1st-level warriors, each with scale mail, a longbow, a buckler, and a longsword.

Bureaucrats

Earnings gp or Influence +4

Create 2 Goods, 4 Influence, 2 Labor (200 gp); Time 2 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Scofflaws, Soldiers

Bureaucrats interface with local government and deal with annoying paperwork related to running a business or organization. This type of team could include accountants, diplomats, lawyers, and scribes. a typical bureaucrat is a 1st-, 2nd-, or 3rd-level expert with ranks in Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), Linguistics, and Profession (barrister, clerk, or scribe).

Cavalry

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +7

Create 8 Goods, 3 Influence, 8 Labor (410 gp); Time 6 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Elite Soldiers, Soldiers; Upgrades To Cavalry Archers

Cavalry are soldiers trained to ride mounts in combat. They are typically 3rd-level warriors, each equipped with breastplate armor, a longsword, a lance, and a heavy steel shield and riding a combat-trained light horse.

Cavalry Archers

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +8

Create 9 Goods, 3 Influence, 10 Labor (470 gp); Time 7 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Cavalry, Elite Archers

Cavalry Archers are soldiers trained to ride mounts and use ranged weapons in combat before closing to melee. They are typically 3rd-level warriors, each equipped with breastplate armor, a short bow, a longsword, a lance, and a heavy steel shield and riding a combat-trained light horse.

Craftspeople

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +4

Create 3 Goods, 2 Influence, 4 Labor (200 gp); Time 2 days; Size 3 people

Craftspeople are trained in a particular Craft or Profession skill and make a living using that skill. Examples of this team are alchemists, carpenters, leatherworkers, masons, and smiths. A typical carpenter is a 4th-level expert with 4 ranks each in Climb, Craft (carpentry), Diplomacy, and Knowledge (engineering and local). Craftspeople in other fields have a similar skill arrangement.

Cutpurses

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +3

Create 3 Influence, 1 Labor (110 gp); Time 1 day Size 5 people

Upgrades To Robbers

Cutpurses are minor thieves (often youths) who earn money from petty crimes such as pickpocketing or stealing items from market stalls. They are typically 1st-level commoners, experts, or rogues with 1 rank in Perception, Sleight of Hand, and Stealth.

Driver

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +2

Create 2 Goods, 1 Influence, 1 Labor (90 gp); Time 0 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades From Laborers; Upgrades To Lackeys

Drivers are trained to handle and move common animals—managing ox-drawn carts, herding cattle, or training riding horses. a Driver is typically a 1st-level expert with ranks in Handle Animal, Knowledge (geography), Profession (driver), Ride, and Survival.

Elite Archers

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +7

Create 5 Goods, 4 Influence, 8 Labor (380 gp); Time 6 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Archers, Elite Soldiers; Upgrades To Cavalry Archers

An Elite Archers team consists of 3rd-level warriors, each with scale mail, a longbow, a buckler, and a longsword.

Elite Guards

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +4

Create 3 Goods, 1 Influence, 4 Labor (170 gp); Time 2 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Guards; Upgrades To Elite Soldiers

Like Guards, this team defends a location but doesn't take on an active role. An Elite Guards team consists of 3rd-level warriors, each wearing a chain shirt or banded mail and using a heavy steel shield and shortspear, a guisarme, or a halberd.

Elite Soldiers

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +6

Create 5 Goods, 3 Influence, 7 Labor (330 gp); Time 5 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Elite Guards, Soldiers; Upgrades To Cavalry, Elite Archers

Like Soldiers, this team will take aggressive action and seek out your enemies to kill them. An Elite Soldiers team consists of 3rd-level warriors, each wearing a chain shirt or banded mail and using a guisarme, a halberd, or a heavy steel shield and a shortspear.

Guards

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +2

Create 2 Goods, 3 Labor (100 gp); Time 1 day Size 5 people

Upgrades From Laborers; Upgrades To Elite Guards, Soldiers

Guards train to watch over a person or location and defend that person or location if necessary. Unlike soldiers, guards are not expected to seek out trouble or take an aggressive role. Their purpose is to intimidate casual threats into leaving and defend against active threats. Each guard is typically a 1st-level warrior wearing scale mail and using either a glaive or a heavy wooden shield and shortspear.

Laborers

Earnings gp or Labor +2

Create 1 Influence, 2 Labor (70 gp); Time 0 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades To Drivers, Guards, Lackeys, Sailors, Scofflaws

Laborers are unskilled workers who carry out basic orders. In most cases, their work is physical labor, though you may recruit laborers for specialized tasks such as begging for your thieves' guild, being professional mourners for your cult, or filling out the cast of a theater performance. They are typically 1st-level commoners with no ranks in Craft or Profession.

Lackeys

Earnings Influence or Labor +2

Create 1 Goods, 2 Influence, 2 Labor (120 gp); Time 1 day Size 5 people

Upgrades From Drivers, Laborers

Lackeys wait on you hand and foot and take care of common domestic and traveling issues; their ranks include butlers, valets, maids, heralds, footmen, ladies-in-waiting, and similar service personnel. Skilled Lackeys anticipate your needs and coordinate with your other employees as well as those of your guests or host. a typical Lackey is a 1st-level commoner or expert with ranks in a subset of Diplomacy, Disguise, Intimidate, Knowledge (local), Knowledge (nobility), Linguistics, Perception, and Sense Motive.

Mage

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +7

Create 3 Goods, 2 Influence, 2 Labor, 8 Magic (960 gp); Time 7 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades From Apprentice

A Mage is a skilled but not especially remarkable arcane spellcaster, often a 3rd-level bard, sorcerer, summoner, witch, or wizard.

Priest

Earnings gp, Influence, or Magic +7

Create 3 Goods, 3 Influence, 3 Labor, 6 Magic (810 gp); Time 7 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades From Acolyte

A Priest is a skilled but unremarkable divine spellcaster, typically a 3rd-level adept, cleric, druid, or oracle, with light armor (or no armor, if an adept) and a weapon appropriate to her faith.

Robbers

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +4

Create 1 Goods, 4 Influence, 3 Labor (200 gp); Time 3 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Cutpurses

Robbers are expert thieves who commit burglary, robbery, and other violent crimes for profit. a typical robber is a 3rd-level expert or rogue with 3 ranks each in Climb, Disable Device, Intimidate, Perception, and Stealth.

Sage

Earnings gp or Influence +5

Create 5 Goods, 2 Influence, 2 Labor (200 gp); Time 4 days; Size 1 person

Upgrades From Acolyte, Apprentice

A sage is a person with extensive knowledge in one or more related areas who can advise you about his areas of expertise. A typical sage is a 3rd-level expert with 3 ranks each in skills such as Appraise, Knowledge, Linguistics, Profession, and Spellcraft.

Sailors

Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +2

Create 1 Goods, 1 Influence, 2 Labor (90 gp); Time 0 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Laborers

Sailors know how to sail a ship, navigate while at sea, and defend the vessel against pirates and other hostile boarders. A typical sailor is a 2nd-level expert with 2 ranks each in Acrobatics, Climb, Perception, Profession (sailor), Survival, and Swim.

Scofflaws

Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +2

Create 3 Influence, 2 Labor (130 gp); Time 1 day Size 5 people

Upgrades From Laborers; Upgrades To Bureaucrats

Scofflaws provide illegal but consensual services such as gambling, moonshining, or underground fighting. Note that other kinds of teams might perform these services (you could recruit a Laborers team to work as prostitutes or a Guards team to run an arena, for example), but this kind of team is skilled at these tasks.

Soldiers

Earnings gp, Influence, or Labor +5

Create 3 Goods, 2 Influence, 5 Labor (220 gp); Time 2 days; Size 5 people

Upgrades From Guards; Upgrades To Archers, Bureaucrats, Cavalry, Elite Soldiers

Soldiers are trained in combat and have the means and will to kill your enemies. Unlike Guards, Soldiers actively engage in fighting on behest of a leader (although you can make Soldiers act as Guards). Depending on the nature of your organization, they might be enforcers rather than military-style soldiers. They are typically 1st-level warriors, each with scale mail, a longsword, a heavy wooden shield, and javelins.

Buildings and Organizations

This section presents many standard buildings and organizations. Each example lists exactly what rooms or teams are used to construct it, a total of each type of capital required if you want to construct one of your own, and a gp total if you want to purchase a completed building of this type. The listed gp value assumes you are purchasing the building instead of constructing it by spending earned capital (see Purchased Cost values from Table: Capital Values).

The examples that follow are not the only ways to construct these kinds of buildings and organizations. A particular Inn might have two Lodgings instead of one, include a Trophy Room instead of a Bar, or display a Statue of the goddess of travelers. A Thieves' Guild might be larger and more thuggish because it includes more Cutpurses and Soldiers than are listed in this section. Use these as typical examples of these kinds of buildings and organizations, a baseline for designing your own versions, or a springboard for ideas on how to use this system to design whatever you want. The system is designed to be flexible so you can construct the kind of building you want to own.

Buildings

Below are example buildings and their component rooms. Note that many of these buildings can also be found in the kingdom-building rules.

Academy

Create 120 Goods, 16 Influence, 109 Labor, 3 Magic (5,360 gp)

Rooms 1 Alchemy Lab, 2 Baths, 1 Bedroom, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Book Repository, 1 Bunks, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Greenhouse, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Observation Dome, 2 Offices, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue

An institution of higher learning.

Alchemist

Create 48 Goods, 2 Influence, 41 Labor, 1 Magic (1,940 gp)

Rooms 1 Alchemy Lab, 1 Bedroom, 1 Garden, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront

The laboratory and home for a ">creator of potions, poisons, and alchemical items.

Arena

Create 109 Goods, 20 Influence, 96 Labor, 1 Magic (4,800 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Bath, 4 Battle Rings, 1 Game Room, 1 Infirmary, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront

A large public structure for competitions, demonstrations, team sports, or bloodsports.

Bank

Create 39 Goods, 3 Influence, 35 Labor (1,570 gp)

Rooms 1 Guard Post, 2 Offices, 1 Secret Room, 1 Storefront, 2 Vaults

A secure building for storing coins and valuables, and for making loans to those in need.

Bardic College

Create 107 Goods, 13 Influence, 109 Labor, 1 Magic (4,810 gp)

Rooms 1 Auditorium, 2 Baths, 1 Bedroom, 1 Book Repository, 1 Bunks, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 2 Offices, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue, 1 Storage

A center for artistic learning in the visual and performing arts, literature, music, and lore.

Barracks

Create 80 Goods, 18 Influence, 73 Labor, 1 Magic (3,700 gp)

Rooms 2 Armories, 1 Bedroom, 2 Bunks, 1 Common Room, 1 Dojo, 1 Guard Post, 1 Infirmary, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage

A building to house guards, militias, or other military forces.

Black Market

Create 53 Goods, 6 Influence, 48 Labor (2,200 gp)

Rooms 1 Armory, 1 Cell, 1 Escape Route, 1 False Front, 1 Guard Post, 1 Office, 1 Secret Room, 1 Storage, 1 Vault

A secret shop that buys and sells a variety of shady, dangerous, and illicit wares.

Brewery

Create 36 Goods, 3 Influence, 32 Labor (1,450 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Brewery, 1 Kitchen, 1 Office, 2 Storages, 1 Workstation

A building for beer and ale brewing, winemaking, distilling, or some similar use.

Bureau

Create 55 Goods, 6 Influence, 52 Labor, 1 Magic (2,420 gp)

Rooms 1 Book Repository, 1 Lavatory, 4 Offices, 2 Scriptoriums, 1 Sitting Room, 2 Storages

A large warren of offices for clerks and record-keepers working for a guild or government.

Caster's Tower

Create 88 Goods, 9 Influence, 81 Labor, 11 Magic (4,750 gp)

Rooms 1 Artisan's Workshop, 1 Bath, 1 Bedroom, 1 Cell, 1 Ceremonial Room, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Magical Repository, 1 Office, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Scrying Room, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage

The home and laboratory for a spellcaster.

Castle

Create 165 Goods, 31 Influence, 148 Labor, 2 Magic (7,390 gp)

Rooms 2 Armories, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bunks, 1 Cell, 1 Courtyard, 1 Crypt, 4 Defensive Walls, 1 Drawbridge, 1 Escape Route, 1 Garden, 1 Gatehouse, 1 Gauntlet, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Stall, 2 Storages

An elaborate fortified home, a noble's retreat, or the heart of a settlement's defenses.

Cathedral

Create 91 Goods, 12 Influence, 84 Labor, 11 Magic (4,960 gp)

Rooms 1 Altar, 1 Bedroom, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Book Repository, 1 Cell, 1 Ceremonial Room, 1 Confessional, 1 Courtyard, 1 Crypt, 1 Garden, 1 Office, 1 Reliquary, 1 Sanctum, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue, 1 Storage

A center of religious and spiritual leadership.

Courthouse

Create 43 Goods, 2 Influence, 41 Labor, 1 Magic (1,840 gp)

Rooms 1 Book Repository, 2 Cells, 1 Common Room, 2 Offices, 1 Sitting Room

A building where cases are heard and disputes resolved according to the rule of law by generally impartial justices.

Dance Hall

Create 53 Goods, 1 Influence, 53 Labor (2,150 gp)

Rooms 1 Ballroom, 1 Bar, 1 Common Room, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage

An establishment for dancing, drinking, and consorting with attractive people. It is often a place where members of different social classes can intermingle discreetly, sometimes using masks or other disguises.

Exotic Artisan

Create 44 Goods, 1 Influence, 41 Labor (1,730 gp)

Rooms 1 Artisan's Workshop, 1 Bedroom, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront

The workshop and home for a creator of magic items, a fireworks maker, a glassblower, or the like.

Farm

Create 53 Goods, 1 Influence, 50 Labor (2,090 gp)

Rooms 1 Animal Pen, 1 Bedroom, 1 Farmland, 1 Garden, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Sitting Room

A small family farm or ranch.

Fort

Create 136 Goods, 25 Influence, 124 Labor, 1 Magic (6,050 gp)

Rooms 2 Armories, 1 Bedroom, 2 Bunks, 1 Cell, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 3 Defensive Walls, 1 Dojo, 2 Fortifications (in the Common Room and Gatehouse), 1 Gatehouse, 1 Infirmary, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage, 1 War Room

A fortified outpost for bandits, mercenaries, soldiers, or dangerous humanoids.

Garrison

Create 126 Goods, 32 Influence, 112 Labor, 1 Magic (5,820 gp)

Rooms 4 Armories, 2 Bedrooms, 4 Bunks, 1 Common Room, 1 Dojo, 1 Guard Post, 1 Infirmary, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 2 Offices, 2 Storages

A large building to house armies, train guards, and recruit militias; it is larger and more versatile than a Barracks.

Granary

Create 30 Goods, 30 Labor (1,200 gp)

Rooms 10 Storages

A place to store grain and food.

Graveyard

Create 18 Goods, 12 Influence, 19 Labor, 5 Magic (1,600 gp)

Rooms 3 Burial Grounds, 1 Crypt, 1 Statue

A plot of land where the dead are buried and honored.

Guildhall

Create 67 Goods, 66 Labor (2,660 gp)

Rooms 1 Common Room, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 2 Offices, 1 Secret Room, 1 Sitting Room, 2 Storages, 3 Workstations

The headquarters for a guild or similar organization.

Herbalist

Create 52 Goods, 1 Influence, 48 Labor (2,030 gp)

Rooms 1 Artisan's Workshop, 1 Bedroom, 1 Greenhouse, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront

The workshop and home of a gardener, healer, poisoner, or potion crafter.

Hospital

Create 45 Goods, 4 Influence, 43 Labor, 2 Magic (2,080 gp)

Rooms 1 Bath, 1 Common Room, 2 Infirmaries, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Statue, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront, 1 Workstation

A building designated as a place for healing the sick.

House

Create 32 Goods, 1 Influence, 31 Labor (1,290 gp)

Rooms 1 Bedroom, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Sewer Access, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Storage

A small cottage that can house up to two adults or a new family.

Inn

Create 52 Goods, 5 Influence, 47 Labor (2,130 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Bath, 1 Bedroom, 1 Common Room, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Lodging, 1 Stall, 1 Storefront

A place for visitors to stay and rest.

Jail

Create 40 Goods, 5 Influence, 33 Labor (1,610 gp)

Rooms 4 Cells, 1 Guard Post, 1 Office, 1 Storage, 1 Torture Chamber

A fortified structure for confining criminals.

Library

Create 29 Goods, 4 Influence, 28 Labor, 2 Magic (1,460 gp)

Rooms 2 Book Repositories, 1 Common Room, 1 Office, 1 Storage

A large building containing an archive of books.

Luxury Store

Create 28 Goods, 1 Influence, 22 Labor (1,030 gp)

Rooms 1 Furnishings (Storefront), 1 Office, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront, 1 Vault

A shop that specializes in expensive wares and luxuries.

Magic Shop

Create 40 Goods, 1 Influence, 33 Labor, 1 Magic (1,590 gp)

Rooms 1 Furnishings (Storefront), 1 Office, 1 Reliquary, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront, 2 Vaults

A shop that specializes in buying and selling magic items, spells, and magical remedies.

Magical Academy

Create 121 Goods, 17 Influence, 110 Labor, 5 Magic (5,630 gp)

Rooms 1 Alchemy Lab, 2 Baths, 1 Bedroom, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Bunks, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Greenhouse, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Magical Repository, 1 Observation Dome, 2 Offices, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue

An institution for training students in the magical arts.

Mansion

Create 132 Goods, 4 Influence, 120 Labor (5,160 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Bath, 4 Bedrooms, 1 Escape Route, 2 Furnishings (Bedroom and Sitting Room), 1 Kitchen, 1 Laundry, 1 Lavatory, 1 Lodging, 1 Office, 1 Secret Room, 2 Sitting Rooms, 1 Stall, 2 Storages

A huge manor housing a rich family and its servants.

Menagerie

Create 200 Goods, 33 Influence, 188 Labor (8,750 gp)

Rooms 2 Animal Pens, 1 Courtyard, 4 Defensive Walls, 1 Farmland, 1 Guard Post, 6 Habitats, 1 Hatchery, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 2 Offices, 1 Stall, 2 Storages, 1 Storefront

A large park stocked with exotic animals and magical beasts.

Military Academy

Create 142 Goods, 16 Influence, 129 Labor, 2 Magic (6,100 gp)

Rooms 1 Armory, 1 Bath, 1 Bedroom, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Book Repository, 1 Cell, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Dojo, 1 Greenhouse, 1 Infirmary, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Lodging, 2 Offices, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue, 1 Storage, 1 War Room

An institution dedicated to the study of war and the training of elite soldiers and officers.

Mill

Create 17 Goods, 16 Labor (660 gp)

Rooms 1 Mill Room, 1 Office, 2 Storages

A building used to cut lumber or grind grain.

Mint

Create 49 Goods, 2 Influence, 45 Labor (1,940 gp)

Rooms 1 Artisan's Workshop, 1 Fortification (Vault), 1 Guard Post, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage, 2 Vaults

A secure building where coinage is minted and standard weights and measures are kept.

Monastery

Create 58 Goods, 15 Influence, 53 Labor, 6 Magic (3,270 gp)

Rooms 1 Altar, 1 Bath, 1 Book Repository, 1 Bunks, 1 Courtyard, 1 Crypt, 1 Garden, 1 Kitchen, 1 Laundry, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 2 Sanctums, 1 Scriptorium

A cloister for meditation and study.

Monument

Create 10 Goods, 8 Labor (360 gp)

Rooms 1 Furnishings (Statue), 1 Statue

A statue of a famous person, a memorial for fallen warriors, or a public display of art.

Museum

Create 47 Goods, 5 Influence, 43 Labor, 1 Magic (2,050 gp)

Rooms 1 Guard Post, 1 Office, 1 Reliquary, 2 Statues, 2 Storages, 1 Storefront, 2 Trophy Rooms, 1 Vault

A place to display art and artifacts both modern and historical.

Noble Villa

Create 218 Goods, 16 Influence, 204 Labor (8,920 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Bath, 4 Bedrooms, 2 Courtyards, 4 Defensive Walls, 1 Escape Route, 2 Furnishings (Bedroom and Sitting Room), 1 Garden, 1 Gatehouse, 1 Kitchen, 1 Labyrinth, 1 Laundry, 1 Lavatory, 1 Lodging, 2 Offices, 2 Secret Rooms, 2 Sitting Rooms, 1 Stall, 1 Statue, 2 Storages, 1 Trophy Room, 1 Vault

A sprawling manor with luxurious grounds.

Observatory

Create 32 Goods, 4 Influence, 31 Labor, 2 Magic (1,580 gp)

Rooms 1 Book Repository, 1 Lavatory, 1 Observation Dome, 1 Office, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Storage

A high dome or tower with optical devices for viewing the heavens.

Orphanage

Create 63 Goods, 7 Influence, 62 Labor, 1 Magic (2,810 gp)

Rooms 1 Bedroom, 1 Bunks, 1 Classroom, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Infirmary, 1 Kitchen, 1 Laundry, 1 Lavatory, 1 Nursery, 1 Office, 2 Storages

A place for taking care of a large number of orphans.

Palace

Create 453 Goods, 42 Influence, 421 Labor, 9 Magic (19,640 gp)

Rooms 1 Altar, 1 Ballroom, 1 Bar, 2 Baths, 6 Bedrooms, 1 Bunks, 1 Cell, 1 Common Room, 2 Courtyards, 1 Crypt, 6 Defensive Walls, 1 Escape Route, 6 Furnishings (in the Ballroom, 2 Bedrooms, Office, Sitting Room, and the Throne Room), 1 Garden, 1 Gatehouse, 2 Kitchens, 1 Labyrinth, 1 Laundry, 2 Lavatories, 2 Lodgings, 2 Offices, 1 Sanctum, 3 Secret Rooms, 3 Sitting Rooms, 1 Sports Field, 4 Stalls, 2 Statues, 6 Storages, 1 Throne Room, 1 Trophy Room, 2 Vaults, 1 War Room

A grand edifice and grounds demonstrating wealth, power, and authority to the world.

Pier

Create 22 Goods, 3 Influence, 20 Labor (930 gp)

Rooms 1 Animal Pen, 1 Dock, 1 Office, 2 Storages

Warehouses and workshops for docking ships and handling cargo and passengers.

School

Create 58 Goods, 5 Influence, 53 Labor (2,370 gp)

Rooms 1 Bell Tower, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 2 Storages, 1 Workstation

A place for educating children and young adults.

Shop

Create 14 Goods, 1 Influence, 12 Labor (550 gp)

Rooms 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront

A general store.

Shrine

Create 3 Goods, 1 Influence, 4 Labor, 1 Magic (270 gp)

Rooms 1 Altar, 1 Statue

A shrine, idol, sacred grove, or similar holy site.

Smithy

Create 18 Goods, 1 Influence, 17 Labor (730 gp)

Rooms 1 Forge, 1 Office, 2 Storages

An armorsmith, blacksmith, or weaponsmith.

Stable

Create 42 Goods, 3 Influence, 39 Labor (1,710 gp)

Rooms 1 Animal Pen, 1 Farmland, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 2 Stalls, 1 Storage

A structure for housing or selling horses and other mounts.

Stockyard

Create 42 Goods, 4 Influence, 37 Labor (1,700 gp)

Rooms 4 Animal Pens, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Pit, 1 Storage, 1 Workstation

Barns and pens where herd animals are stored and prepared for nearby slaughterhouses.

Tannery

Create 20 Goods, 1 Influence, 20 Labor (830 gp)

Rooms 1 Laundry, 1 Lavatory, 1 Leather Workshop, 1 Office, 1 Pit, 1 Storage

A structure where workers prepare hides and leather.

Tavern

Create 22 Goods, 1 Influence, 22 Labor (910 gp)

Rooms 1 Bar, 1 Common Room, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage

An eating or drinking establishment.

Temple

Create 28 Goods, 2 Influence, 29 Labor, 2 Magic (1,400 gp)

Rooms 1 Altar, 1 Bedroom, 1 Common Room, 1 Confessional, 1 Office, 1 Sanctum, 1 Statue, 1 Storage

A large place of worship dedicated to a deity.

Tenement

Create 41 Goods, 16 Influence, 41 Labor (2,120 gp)

Rooms 4 Bunks, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Storage

A flophouse for housing a large number of people who pay low rent.

Theater

Create 41 Goods, 2 Influence, 46 Labor (1,800 gp)

Rooms 1 Auditorium, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Secret Room, 2 Storages, 1 Storefront

A venue for entertainment such as plays, operas, and concerts.

Town Hall

Create 23 Goods, 2 Influence, 23 Labor (980 gp)

Rooms 1 Common Room, 1 Lavatory, 1 Office, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Storage

A public venue for holding town meetings, with storage for town records.

Trade Shop

Create 19 Goods, 1 Influence, 16 Labor (730 gp)

Rooms 1 Lavatory, 1 Storage, 1 Storefront, 1 Workstation

A shop front for a tradesperson such as a baker or butcher.

University

Create 94 Goods, 10 Influence, 88 Labor, 2 Magic (4,140 gp)

Rooms 1 Bath, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Book Repository, 2 Classrooms, 1 Common Room, 1 Courtyard, 1 Greenhouse, 1 Kitchen, 1 Lavatory, 1 Observation Dome, 2 Offices, 1 Scriptorium, 1 Sitting Room, 1 Statue

An institution of higher learning.

Watchtower

Create 35 Goods, 9 Influence, 25 Labor (1,470 gp)

Rooms 1 Armory, 1 Bell Tower, 1 Gatehouse

A tall structure that serves as a guard post.

Waterfront

Create 63 Goods, 10 Influence, 56 Labor (2,680 gp)

Rooms 2 Animal Pens, 4 Docks, 1 Office, 4 Storages, 1 Workstation

A port for waterborne arrival and departure, with facilities for shipping and shipbuilding.

Organizations

This section details several standard organizations, the cost of creating them, and which teams from the downtime system you can recruit to form them. Unless you own a building where these people can reside, they have their own homes.

Artisans' Guild

Create 8 Goods, 10 Influence, 14 Labor (740 gp)

Teams 1 Bureaucrats, 2 Craftspeople, 2 Laborers

Artisans and assistants who create quality goods.

Bounty Hunters

Create 8 Goods, 8 Influence, 10 Labor (600 gp)

Teams 1 Archers, 1 Bureaucrats, 1 Driver

Fighters trained to find and capture criminals and escapees.

Brute Squad

Create 7 Goods, 8 Influence, 13 Labor (640 gp)

Teams 1 Robbers, 2 Soldiers

A gang of well-armed professionals who throw their weight around on your behalf.

Cabal

Create 16 Goods, 12 Influence, 8 Labor, 24 Magic (3,240 gp)

Teams 4 Apprentices, 1 Mage, 1 Sage

A study group of peers and apprentices devoted to arcane mysteries and research.

Caravan Crew

Create 6 Goods, 3 Influence, 7 Labor (350 gp)

Teams 2 Drivers, 1 Guards, 1 Laborers

Travelers skilled in loading, transporting, and unloading trade goods from animals, wagons, and ships.

Cult

Create 15 Goods, 11 Influence, 17 Labor, 18 Magic (2,770 gp)

Teams 4 Acolytes, 2 Guards, 1 Priest

A splinter religion or secret society that believes yours is the true faith.

Entourage

Create 6 Goods, 9 Influence, 7 Labor (530 gp)

Teams 1 Bureaucrats, 1 Driver, 2 Lackeys

Friends and toadies who take care of your eating, sleeping, travel, and entertainment arrangements.

Fight Club

Create 5 Goods, 7 Influence, 10 Labor (510 gp)

Teams 1 Driver, 1 Guards, 1 Laborers, 1 Lackeys, 1 Scofflaws

A possibly illegal association of boxing aficionados.

Hunting Party

Create 5 Goods, 6 Influence, 11 Labor (500 gp)

Teams 1 Archers, 1 Laborers, 1 Lackeys

The necessary guides and assistants for sport hunting.

Mercenary Company

Create 18 Goods, 13 Influence, 25 Labor, 6 Magic (1,850 gp)

Teams 1 Elite Archers, 2 Elite Soldiers, 1 Priest

A well-armed group of warriors who are loyal to you, and who are paid to guard or fight.

Ship Crew

Create 1 Goods, 2 Influence, 4 Labor (160 gp)

Teams 1 Laborers, 1 Sailors

The crew of a small sailing vessel.

Theater Company

Create 15 Goods, 17 Influence, 13 Labor, 20 Magic (3,070 gp)

Teams 5 Apprentices, 1 Bureaucrats, 1 Craftspeople, 1 Laborers

Performers, set dressers, and costumers for an acting troupe or similar group.

Thieves' Guild

Create 4 Goods, 15 Influence, 12 Labor (770 gp)

Teams 2 Cutpurses, 1 Robbers, 1 Scofflaws, 1 Soldiers

A band of criminals and thugs who commit illegal acts.

Vagabonds

Create 10 Goods, 13 Influence, 13 Labor, 7 Magic (1,550 gp)

Teams 1 Acolyte, 1 Apprentice, 1 Cutpurses, 2 Drivers, 1 Guards, 1 Laborers, 1 Scofflaws

Unsavory wanderers skilled at stage magic, fortunetelling, rigged games, and snake oil.

Downtime Events

The following events are examples of the sort of random encounters a GM can add to the downtime system. Rolling for events occurs during the Event phase.

The first set of events consists of events that could happen to any kind of building—bad weather, a fire, a famous visitor, and so on. Following those generic events are specific events keyed to certain types of buildings—an Inn has different events than a Military Academy or Smithy. This section concludes with events for several kinds of organizations. Not every building and organization has its own event table—the GM should use the Generic Building Events table or take inspiration from this section to make tables for other buildings and organizations.

If you don't own any buildings or organizations in a settlement, the GM can use these event tables to create events for buildings you are in or near. For example, the GM can use the Tavern Events table to generate an event while you are at a tavern. The event descriptions assume that you are the owner, so the GM should adjust the outcome if you are merely present for an event.

These tables are designed so low rolls tend to be beneficial and high rolls are harmful or dangerous. If you're using the settlement danger value, add the danger value to the percentile roll. Some results have you roll on another event table. Reroll any results that don't make sense.

Many events allow a skill check to affect the outcome of the event. If you're present, either attempt this skill check yourself or ask another member of the party or a manager to attempt the check for you. If you're absent, either your representative (such as a cohort or manager) attempts the check or roll 1d20 with no bonuses to determine the result. The GM can also allow methods other than those listed to end harmful events. For example, you might be able to end an ongoing rivalry event by befriending the owner of the rival business or driving him out of town.

Table: Generic Building Events
d% Event
01–02 Good fortune
03–08 Day of rest
09–12 Good weather
13–15 Famous visitor
16–65 Building-specific Event
66–73 Rumormongering
74–77 Good weather
78–80 Fire
81–82 Deadly accident
83–84 Infestation
85–88 Rivalry
89–90 Sickness
91–94 Taxes
95–98 Criminal activity
99–100 Roll twice

Bad Weather: a particularly bad patch of weather plagues the area. There's a 10% chance the weather is devastating. Attempt a DC 20 Survival check. If you succeed, you've anticipated the weather and your building is unaffected. If you fail, the bad weather damages some of your supplies, and you lose 1d4 points of Goods. If the bad weather is devastating, your building gains the broken condition.

Building-Specific Event: Roll on the specific table for your building. If there is no event table for that kind of building, reroll this result.

Criminal Activity: The building is targeted by petty criminals. You can spend 2d4 points of Influence to cause them to leave you alone, negating this event. Otherwise, attempt a DC 20 Intimidate check. If you succeed, the criminals are caught and you gain 1 point of Influence. Otherwise, the criminals rob your building, and you lose 1d8 points of Goods.

Day of Rest: It's an unusually relaxing day. Nothing bad happens, and minor events seem to conspire to make all the little things work out perfectly. People are well rested and in good spirits. You gain 1d3 points of Labor.

Deadly Accident: Someone has a dreadful accident in or near your building. Roll 1d6; on a 1–4, the victim is a random employee or building resident, and on a 5–6, the victim is a visitor or passerby. The GM determines the type of accident. The victim is hurt badly and is dying. a successful DC 15 Heal check or the application of any magical healing prevents death. If the person dies, you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Famous Visitor: Someone famous visits the settlement. This could be a beloved actress, a vaunted hero, a celebrated noble, or the like. Attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy check. On a success, the famous visitor visits your building, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. Otherwise you're snubbed and lose 1d2 points of Influence.

Fire: a fire breaks out in your building. There's a 75% chance it's just a minor fire that costs you 1d2 points of Goods, but otherwise it's a major fire and becomes a significant danger. For a major fire, unless you utilize magic like quench , pyrotechnics , or other fire-suppressing tactics, you lose 2d6 points of Goods, Labor, or Magic (splitting this cost up however you wish) and your building gains the broken condition.

Good Fortune: You have a run of good luck. For 7 days, this building gains a +4 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. In addition, the next time you roll a building event, you can roll twice and take either result.

Good Weather: The beautiful weather boosts morale and business. The building gets a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Infestation: You have uninvited guests — spiders in the cellar, stirges in the attic, rats in the walls, or something similarly unpleasant. As long as your building is infested, it takes a -10 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each day the infestation continues, you lose 1 point of Goods, Labor, or Magic (chosen randomly, reroll if it's a type of capital you don't have). To end an infestation, you must succeed at a DC 20 Handle Animal or Survival check; the DC increases by 1 for each day the infestation persists (maximum DC 30). Alternatively, the GM may allow you to resolve the infestation with a combat encounter.

Rivalry: a rival starts to work against you. At the start of each Income phase, you must succeed at a DC 20 skill check (with a skill that makes sense for the type of building) or either lose 1d2 points of Influence or give the building a –5 penalty on its checks to generate currency for 1d10 days (50% chance of either penalty). You may attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Diplomacy check once per day to end the rivalry. Success means the rivalry ends (as does any ongoing penalty from this event). Failure means the rivalry continues. The rivalry ends automatically the next time you roll this event (this doesn't replace the old rivalry with a new one).

Rumormongering: People are talking about you. Attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy check. On a success, word spreads far that your presence in the region is valuable and welcomed, and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. On a failure, the rumors are not so complimentary (and perhaps even insulting), and you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Sickness: Your employees have become sick, and any earnings from this building today are halved. Attempt a DC 15 Heal check at the end of each day—on a success, your employees get well enough to work. If you fail, the sickness persists to the next day. Each day sickness persists, you have a 20% chance of losing 1d2 points of Labor.

Taxes: You must pay some unexpected taxes. You can either pay the tax amount (1% of the total gp value of your building) or attempt a DC 20 Bluff check to talk your way out of the taxes. If you succeed, you don't have to pay these taxes. If you fail, the tax owed doubles and you can't talk your way out of it.

Building-specific Events

Table: Alchemist Events
d% Event
01–10 Discovery
11–30 Cold remedy
31–40 Healing potion demand
41–45 Embarrassing affliction
46–55 Cosmetic problem
56–70 Accidental poisoning
71–80 Contamination
81–85 Unstable mutation
86–95 Explosion
96–100 Outbreak

Accidental Poisoning: An inept employee accidentally poisons one of your customers—enough to debilitate the customer for a few days, but not enough to cause a fatality. You lose 1 point of Influence. There's a 25% chance this customer is actually a rival alchemist snooping around, in which case your rival's shop is closed for 1d6 days, and because of the lack of competition your business gains a +5 bonus during that time on its first check each day to generate capital.

Contamination: Rat poison, laxative, or some other dangerous product spills into the rest of your wares, forcing you to throw out the contaminated inventory. You lose 1d6 for 1d6 days Goods or Influence, divided as you see fit. Alternatively, you may continue to sell the tainted product, treating this event as an accidental poisoning (01–50), cosmetic problem (51–90), or outbreak (91–100).

Cold Remedy: Your create a treatment for a minor illness currently making the rounds in the settlement. You gain 1 point of Influence, and the building gains a +5 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Cosmetic Problem: a batch of bad potions causes side effects such as abnormal hair growth or loss, skin discoloration, warts, or unusual body odor. You lose 1d2 points of Magic and 1d3 points of Influence.

Discovery: The introduction of a new material makes your alchemical recipes more potent, leading to booming sales. For 1d6 days, the business gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Embarrassing Affliction: a wealthy merchant, noble, or other person of note privately asks for help with a personal problem, such as halitosis or bedroom performance problems. If you succeed at a DC 20 Craft (alchemy) check, you discreetly deal with the problem and gain 1d4 points of Influence; there's a 10% chance the customer recommends you to someone with a similar problem and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. If you fail, there is no effect, but this doesn't reflect poorly on you because the customer wishes to keep the problem private.

Explosion: Crafting goes awry or dangerous reagents are spilled, causing an explosion. You lose 1d2 points of Goods and must attempt a DC 20 Survival check. If you fail, your building catches fire, as the fire event, except there is a 50% chance of a minor fire and a 50% chance of a major fire.

Healing potion demand: Local temples have a healing potion shortage and ask you to help pick up the slack with alchemical remedies. Attempt a DC 20 Craft (alchemy) check. If you succeed, the healers praise you and you gain 1 point of Influence and 1d2 points of Magic. Otherwise, the healers badmouth your incompetence or unwillingness to help, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence.

Outbreak: Something in your shop is making people sick—perhaps a bad reaction created poisonous gas, a monstrous ingredient carries a lingering disease, or a rival alchemist planted something dangerous. Attempt a DC 30 Craft (alchemy) check. If you succeed, you remedy the problem before it causes any permanent harm. Otherwise, treating and compensating the victims costs you 1d3 points of Goods, 1d4 points of Influence, and 1 point of Magic.

Unstable Mutation: a alchemical mishap causes one employee to temporarily mutate into a hideous, clumsy creature. Either you hide the employee in your business, losing 1d2 points of Goods per day for 1d3 days as the employee accidentally breaks merchandise, or you send the employee home and the building takes a –5 penalty on its next 1d3 checks to generate capital since people know about this incident.

Table: Bardic College Events
d% Event
01–10 Visiting master
11–25 Prodigy
26–30 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
31–50 Supply shortage
51–60 Hazardous stage
61–70 Stolen instrument
71–75 Failing adept
76–85 Vandalism
86–95 Adept student
96–100 Hazing gone wrong

Adept Student: Harnessing your newest protege's remarkable talent requires extra attention from you, lest a rival college steal her away. If you spend 1d2 points of Influence per day for 1d6 days, the student remains at your school. Otherwise, the student leaves, you lose 1d6 points of Influence, and the building generates half the normal amount of capital for 1d6 days.

Failing Adept: a favored student is getting bad grades in all of his classes, and you must do some creative bookkeeping to keep him at the school. Attempt a DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check to convince the instructors to give him another chance. Failure means you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Hazardous Stage: The college's stage needs renovations. You must spend 1 point of Labor or succeed at a DC 15 Craft (carpentry) check to make sure reconstruction goes smoothly. If you don't, a student breaks through the stage floor during rehearsal, costing you 1 point of Labor and halving the capital the building generates for 1d6 days.

Hazing Gone Wrong: This is the same as the event of this name on Table: Magical Academy Events.

Prodigy: One of your students turns out to be a prodigy. You gain 1d4 points of Influence, and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Stolen Instrument: One student's valuable instrument has been stolen right before an important performance. If you succeed at a DC 30 Perform check, you find a suitable replacement and offers from investors gain you 1d3 points of Goods. Otherwise, you lose 1d3 points of Influence.

Supply Shortage: a shortage in teaching supplies makes it difficult for instructors to do their jobs. You lose 1d6 points of Goods and Labor, divided as you see fit.

Vandalism: Someone has defaced your curtains with obscenities on opening night. You may spend 1d6 points of Goods and Influence, divided as you see fit, to fix the curtains. If you don't, you must succeed at a DC 25 Perform check to create a memorable performance that makes the audience forget the curtains. Failure means many guests are offended and demand refunds, and the amount of capital the building generates is halved for 1d6+1 days.

Visiting Master: a famous traveling bard has offered to teach your students for a week. For 7 days, you may trade Goods, Influence, and Labor on a 1-for-1 basis.

Table: Caster's Tower Events
d% Event
01–05 Arcane breakthrough
06–10 Mysterious item
11–40 Desperate visitor
41–65 Roll on Table: Magic Shop Events
66–95 Catastrophic mishap
96–100 Dangerous surge

Arcane Breakthrough: Your hard work has resulted in the discovery of a new magic spell. Your apprentices have to work frantically to pen the spell, costing you 1d4 points of Labor and 1d6 points of Magic. There's a 75% chance this creates an arcane scroll of a random low-level spell (roll 1d4 to determine the spell level), and a 25% chance it creates an arcane scroll of a random mid-level spell (roll 1d2+4 to determine the spell level).

Catastrophic Mishap: An accident in one of your lab rooms causes severe structural damage to your tower — blowing out an entire floor, sinking the building halfway into the ground, or causing things not bolted down to simply float away. There's a 50% chance this event causes a fire (see Generic Building Events). Otherwise, the damage and aftereffects cost you 1d4 points of Influence, and the building gains the broken condition until you spend 2d6 points of Magic to repair it.

Dangerous Surge: Through some inexplicable conflux of celestial events, ley lines, and an unusual ingredient, your building creates more magic than you know what to do with. In addition to its normal capital, the building generates 1d3 points of Magic per day for 1d6 days. However, on each of these days, you must spend at least half of this extra Magic (converting it to gp or another form of capital does not count) or the building gains the broken condition, all unspent additional Magic created by this event dissipates, and any remaining days of additional Magic from this event are lost.

Desperate Visitor: a mysterious visitor arrives asking for magical help with a personal and time-sensitive matter. If you succeed at a DC 25 Knowledge (arcana) check, you discreetly deal with the problem; you gain 1d4 points of Influence, and there is a 10% chance that the visitor recommends you to someone with a similar problem and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. If you fail this check, you are unable to help the visitor, word spreads of your ineptitude, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Mysterious Item: a mysterious magic item is discovered on your doorstep, is unearthed by one of your employees, or is delivered to you by a desperate adventurer. If you succeed at a DC 30 Spellcraft check, you identify it as a random magic item worth 500 gp or less, though its unusual history might give it a higher value. Failing this check means you are unable to identify it, or you detect traces of curse magic; either way, you must sell it quickly to someone else for 1d10 × 10 gp before it causes you any trouble.

Table: Castle Events
d% Event
01–20 Grand feast
21–35 New servant
36–55 Inadequate defenses
56–75 Training drill
76–85 Offensive jester
86–100 Uprising

Grand Feast: Your latest gala, ball, banquet, festival, or similar event turned out smashingly. Visitors from all over made their way to your grand event, and you gain 1d6 points of Influence for throwing such a well-received party.

Inadequate Defenses: One of your Castle's key defenses isn't sound—be it the moat, the keep, a turret, or some other integral part. The building gains the broken condition until you spend 1d6 points each of Goods and Labor repairing it.

New Servant: One of the new workers in your Castle — such as a guard, castellan, or cook — is having a rough first day and causing all sorts of mayhem. You lose 1d2 points of Goods to the rookie's mess. Taking the servant under your wing results in an additional loss of 1d2 points of Goods per day for 1d3 days (due to breakage and other mishaps), but earns you 1 point of Influence and 1d6 points of Labor at the end of the training period. If you fire the incompetent underling, you gain 1d6 points of Influence as word of your iron-fisted management spreads.

Offensive Jester: While enjoying the entertainments of your jester, your guests are dumbstruck at one of the clown's more scurrilous performances, and you must make a difficult decision about what to do with this foul-mouthed but popular bard. If you make an example of the jester (through dismissal, imprisonment, or execution), you lose 1d6 Influence because of angry peers. If you laugh off the insult, you gain the respect of your servants and the common people, but lose 1 Influence and 1d3 points of Labor.

Training Drill: The guards and soldiers of your Castle need constant training in order to stay on top of their duties. Attempt a DC 25 Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Profession (soldier) check. Success means the building gains a +2 bonus on all checks for 7 days. Failure indicates that your troops have fallen behind on their drills. You lose 1d2 points of Labor as you retrain them to their former proficiency.

Uprising: Armed rabble — prisoners in the dungeons, angry peasants, or a tribe of primitive humanoids — plan to attack your Castle. You can bribe them to disperse by spending 1d6 points of Goods, but there is a 25% chance they come back 5d6 days later wanting more. If you convince them to calm down with a successful DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check, you gain 1d3 points of Influence for your willingness to speak to them. Failing this check means they damage your Castle, costing you 1d6+1 points of Goods and Labor, divided as you choose. You can instead use magic or violence to deal with the upstarts (either directly or through your guards), but you lose 1d3 points of Influence and 1d3 points of Labor as news of your actions spreads.

Table: Dance Hall Events
d% Event
01–25 Famous dancer
26–35 Heart's desire
36–55 Ballroom magic
56–70 Sweaty pox
71–85 Fiendish skill
86–95 Accursed lounge
96–100 Wild night

Accursed Lounge: One of the lounges is rumored to be cursed, and it's affecting business. While the curse persists (whether it is real or imagined), the building's generated currency is reduced by half, but any day that it generates at least 3 points of Influence there is a 25% chance that it also generates 1 point of Magic. You may end this event by spending 2 points of Influence and 1 of Magic, or by casting bless, break enchantment, or remove curse on the room.

Ballroom Magic: An enthusiastic local spellcaster offers to use magic to temporarily enhance your employees' appeal and skills. If you spend 1d2 points of Magic, the building gains a +10 bonus on checks to generate gp or Influence for the next 2d6 days.

Famous Dancer: A well-known dancer has heard of your Dance Hall and is making a guest appearance for a limited time! The dancer stays for 1d4 days. Each day the dancer stays, you gain 1d2 points of Influence. If any event causes you to lose Goods or Magic, the dancer leaves and you lose an amount of Labor equal to half the Influence you gained from the dancer's presence.

Fiendish Skill: One of your best dancers is tainted by evil magic — he's possessed, was replaced by a shapechanging evil outsider, or something similar — and is preying upon your customers. Spend 5 Magic or use appropriate spells to exorcise the evil presence. If not, you lose 1 point of Influence or Labor (your choice) each day, but the building gains a +10 bonus on checks to generate gp or Magic.

Heart's Desire: A local noble wants to elope with one of your dancers. If you give permission for this, attempt a Diplomacy check and (whether you succeed or fail) multiply the result × 5 gp to determine your profits in terms of bribes and jewelry. If you refuse, you must succeed at a DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check to avoid losing 1d3 points of Influence and 1 point of Labor.

Sweaty Pox: Your employees are all developing fevers and unsightly sores, scaring away and possibly infecting customers. Until you spend 1d6 points of Goods, 1d6 points of Influence, or 1d3 points of Magic to eradicate this problem, your building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each Event phase that this pox persists, there is a 20% chance that your building also gets an infestation (see Table: Generic Building Events).

Wild Night: Overzealous patrons damage furnishings in a lounge or the main hall. The building takes a –10 penalty on checks to generate capital until repairs costing 1d3 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Labor are made.

Table: Guildhall Events
d% Event
01–25 Prosperity
26–35 Renovations
36–55 Increased taxes
56–70 Infighting
71–85 Rival guild
86–100 Unfair practices

Increased Taxes: New laws increase the tariffs placed on local guilds—or perhaps you are the victim of an overzealous tax collector with a grudge against you. Attempt a DC 20 Craft or Profession check appropriate to the nature of your guild. If you fail, the building takes a permanent –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Each time you roll this event again, this penalty stacks (maximum –25). At any point you can spend 1d3 points of Goods or Influence to pay these taxes, bribe the tax collector, or find a loophole in the law, reducing the penalty by 5 (minimum 0).

Infighting: Guild politics have gotten out of hand, and it's up to you to quell the increasingly heated arguments and even open brawls that are happening in the Guildhall. The infighting lasts 2d6 days. Attempt one DC 25 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Sense Motive check on each of these days. For each failure, you lose 1 point of Influence as you show you're an ineffective leader. If you succeed 3 times, you regain control, the event ends, and you gain an amount of Influence equal to the number of days remaining.

Prosperity: Business is booming. For 1d6 days, the Guildhall gains a +5 bonus on its first check each day to generate capital.

Renovations: Because of shoddy workmanship, age, a curse, or bad luck, the Guildhall needs maintenance. The building has the broken condition until you spend 1d6 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Labor for the renovations. Once you renovate, there's a 25% chance you discover a valuable item during the construction, such as a forgotten tome, rare trophy, or long-lost gemstone. You may keep or sell this item. If you sell it, you gain 1d6 × 20 gp.

Rival Guild: a rival guild has opened in the settlement, drawing potential members and customers away from yours. Treat this as a rivalry event (see Generic Building Events). Until the rivalry ends, the building takes a –10 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Unfair Practices: One of the guild members hasn't been contributing her fair share—skimming off the top, not paying dues, doing work for a rival guild, or taking more than her fair share of the profits. You can spend 1d4 points of Influence to discipline this member or attempt a DC 25 Intimidate check to set her straight. If you succeed at this check, you frighten her into donating excess funds to the guild to make up for previous transgressions, earning you 1d6 points of Goods. Failing the check costs you an additional 1d4 points of Influence as other members realize they can get away with more.

Table: Herbalist Events
d% Event
01–10 Dangerous discovery
11–30 Roll on Table: Alchemist Events
31–55 Snake oil
56–70 Exhausting concoction
71–80 New intoxicant
81–100 Noxious fumes

Dangerous Discovery: While experimenting with a recipe, you accidentally create a dose of poison. Randomly select one poison that costs 500 gp or less per dose. You can keep this dose for your own use or sell it at full value. Note that selling poison might be illegal in the settlement.

Exhausting Concoction: Accidental exposure to a stimulating herbal treatment has given your workers insomnia, allowing them to increase their output. For 1d6 days, each day you can spend 1 point of Influence to push the workers, giving the building a +10 bonus on its first check that day to generate capital.

New Intoxicant: You discover a natural substance—perhaps a rare herb or a refined form of a common beverage—that creates a pleasant, intoxicating sensation. If you spend 1d4 points of Influence and succeed at a DC 20 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check, you convince the local authorities to allow you to sell it, and for 2d6 days the building gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. If you fail or don't attempt the check, the substance is declared illegal, a threat to society, or immoral. If the substance is banned, you can sell it illegally for only a short while before the risk grows too great; for 2d4 days, the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. There is a 10% chance than an unscrupulous employee may continue selling this intoxicating substance on the side without your permission or knowledge (which may lead to complications with local authorities).

Noxious Fumes: The horrible stink created by one of your latest concoctions makes the workers ill. Attempt a DC 25 Craft (alchemy) or Profession (herbalist) check to create a counteragent before anyone has to take days off to recover. If you succeed, you end the event with no penalties. If you fail, you lose 2d4 points of Labor; each point of Magic you spend reduces the amount of Labor lost by 2.

Snake Oil: You've created an invigorating tonic that makes people feel better, though whether or not it has any actual curative effect is dubious. If you spend 1 point of Influence or Magic, you can attempt a DC 25 Bluff check to convince the locals to try your cure-all. If you succeed, the building gains a +15 bonus on its next check to generate capital. You can attempt this check every day after you roll this event, but the DC increases by 2 with each attempt. If you fail the check, the event ends, and you can no longer attempt these daily checks (at least, not until you roll this event again).

Table: House Events
d% Event
01–10 Buried relic
11–35 Roll on Table: Inn Events
36–55 Neighbor rivalry
56–65 Haunting
66–80 Fussy neighbor
81–95 Unstable foundation
96–100 Arson

Arson: Someone sets your House on fire to send you a message. Treat this as the fire event.

Buried Relic: You find an unusual object on your property — a gem, piece of jewelry, or magic item worth 300 gp or less. There's a 5% chance that the item is cursed or in some way faulty. Each time you roll this event, the chance of a cursed item increases by 5% (maximum 30% chance).

Fussy Neighbor: A highly influential neighbor insists that you remodel some of your House's rooms. Choose 1d3 random rooms in your House to renovate, and pay an amount of gp equal to 20% of the cost of those rooms. For every 2 points of Influence you own, the gp cost decreases by 5%; if this reduces the cost to 0, you don't have to remodel. If you refuse to remodel, you lose 1d4 points of Influence.

Haunting: A supernatural presence enters your home. Roll d%; on a 01–20, the presence is harmful, on a 21–80, it's mischievous, and on an 81–100 it's helpful. A harmful presence increases capital attrition of 1 point of Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic per week, and has a 10% chance per night of attacking one overnight guest with a nightmare. A mischievous presence might bring bad luck (50%) or good luck (50%) to one roll for anyone who sleeps in your home; bad luck functions as if the subject were affected by the touch of chaos granted power from the Chaos domain, and good luck functions as if the subject were affected by the bit of luck granted power from the Luck domain. A helpful presence must be appeased once every 7 days with a successful DC 15 Diplomacy check. If you succeed at the check, you also gain 1 point of Influence or Labor (your choice). If you fail, the presence leaves on its own. Getting rid of any variety of supernatural presence requires appropriate spells or spending 2d6 points of Magic.

Neighbor Rivalry: You have a disagreement with a neighbor. Attempt a DC 15 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. If you succeed, the event ends. If you fail, you lose 1 point of Influence and must attempt another check each day, increasing the DC by 2 each time. At any time you can bury the hatchet and spend Goods or Labor (1 + 1 for each time you failed the check to end this event) to end the event by doing something nice for the neighbor.

Unstable Foundation: The foundation of your House is sinking. The building gains the broken condition, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence due to the embarrassment. It costs 1d2 points of Goods and 1d6 points of Labor to bolster the foundation and remove the broken condition.

Table: Inn Events
d% Event
01–15 Talk of the town
16–30 Food shortage
31–55 Roll on Table: Tavern Events
56–75 Strange guest
76–95 Theft
96–100 Violence

Food Shortage: Business is booming, but your food and drink stores are depleted by this increased demand. You lose 1d4 points of Goods. If you still have Goods left after paying this cost, you gain 1 point of Influence; otherwise, you lose 1 point of Influence and the building takes a –5 penalty on its next 1d6 checks to generate capital.

Strange Guest: When a rapping at the front door awakes you from your slumber one stormy night, you find a shadowy, mysterious stranger on your Inn's stoop. There's a 50% chance this guest is just a wandering traveler seeking sanctuary from the foul weather, a 25% chance the guest brought you a gift in return for refuge (earning you your choice of 1d4 points of Goods or Influence), and a 25% chance the guest has violent intentions (in which case the GM should create a combat encounter suitable for your level).

Talk of the Town: Your Inn is a beacon of safety and warmth, and the business you've been doing has earned you a growing reputation in the surrounding settlements. If you succeed at a DC 25 Diplomacy or Perform check, you steer the rumors favorably to increase business, and for 2d6 days, the building gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Theft: Your last guests stole property — items crucial to running the Inn. Until you pay 2d20 gp to replace these items, the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Alternatively, the GM may allow you to track down the thieves and reclaim your stolen property as an adventure encounter.

Violence: There is a 60% chance that this is just a simple brawl in the common room, and a 40% chance that someone has attempted actual harm against your employees or guests. If it is a simple brawl, you can break it up with a successful DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check or by spending 1 point of Goods on the quarrelers. If it is a violent attack and you're present when it occurs, you can attempt to intercede (the GM should determine an appropriate combat encounter). Whether or not the violent attack is successful, the perpetrator must be dealt with. If you do nothing at all, you lose 1d4 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor as you lose frightened customers and employees. If you want the local authorities to take care of it, attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. Success means an investigation and arrest occur without any negative repercussions. Failure means you lose 1d4 points of Influence and 1 point of Labor. If you find and punish the perpetrator yourself (or hire someone to do so), you gain 1d4 points of Influence.

Table: Library Events
d% Event
01–30 Pile of books
31–45 Famous writer
46–50 Strange visitor
51–55 Rare find
56–70 Fire
71–75 Bookworm infestation
76–100 Stolen books

Bookworm Infestation: Your Library has become infested with the bane of the printed page—bookworms. You lose 1 point each of Goods and Magic. Proceed as if this were the infestation event from the Generic Building Events section, except that you lose 1 point each of Goods and Magic each day the infestation persists.

Famous Writer: A famous writer wants to use your Library for research for 2d6 days. Each day the writer remains, you gain 1 point of Influence. The writer leaves early if any event causes you to lose Goods or Magic. If the writer leaves early, you must succeed at a DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check to avoid losing twice the amount of Influence you gained from the visiting writer because of negative rumors.

Fire: A fire breaks out. See the fire event in Generic Building Events. This is always a major fire.

Pile of Books: Your Library has the chance to acquire a large number of books. These could come from an estate sale, ally, or adventurers who found old tomes in a dungeon. Attempt a DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check. On a success, the owner donates the books; on a failure, you may purchase them by paying 100 gp for each point by which you failed the check. If you attain the books either way, you gain 1d2 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Magic.

Rare Find: Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge check (with your choice of knowledge skill). If you succeed, you discover a rare book owned by someone who doesn't understand its significance. You may either purchase the book for 2d6 gp to gain 1d4 points of Magic and 1d2 points of Influence, or inform the book's owner of the truth to instead gain 2d6 points of Influence. If you buy the book, there's a 5% chance it contains a randomly determined magic scroll.

Stolen Books: Thieves have stolen several of your most important books! The Library gains the broken condition until it is repaired or the stolen books are recovered (in which case the GM should create an encounter suitable for your level to represent the thieves).

Strange Visitor: A strange visitor comes to your Library in search of books that you fear contain dangerous knowledge. You can turn him away with a successful DC 25 Diplomacy or Intimidate check, but doing so could anger him — 5% of the time, such strange visitors are powerful creatures in disguise who resort to violence to get what they want. Allowing the visitor to peruse your Library's resources might have unfortunate future repercussions, at the GM's discretion.

Table: Magic Shop Events
d% Event
01–25 Clueless adventurer
26–30 Roll on Table: Shop Events
31–35 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
36–50 Unexpected magic
51–70 Burglary
71–100 Concerned citizens

Burglary: Thieves have attempted to break into your shop to steal your magic. You can immediately spend 1d6 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Perception or Spellcraft check. On a success, your building's defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. On a failure, you lose 1d4 points of Goods and 2d4 points of Magic.

Clueless Adventurer: An adventurer comes to the shop seeking to sell a magic item that she has misidentified or doesn't understand the true nature of. Most of the time, this item is relatively minor (worth less than 1,000 gp), but 10% of the time it's a randomly determined item of a greater value (up to 4,000 gp). The adventurer offers to sell the item to you for half of what she thinks its actual value is (for example, if she thinks a potion of cure serious wounds is actually a potion of cure moderate wounds, she asks for 150 gp instead of 375 gp). If you inform the adventurer of the item's actual abilities and value before buying it (and adjust your buying price accordingly), word of your honesty gets around and you gain 2d6 points of Influence. There is a 50% chance the informed adventurer decides to keep the item and a 50% chance she decides to sell it to you anyway at your offered buying price.

Concerned Citizens: Locals often misunderstand magic, and when strange things or unfortunate accidents occur, they're quick to blame the local Magic Shop. The newest spate of dead cattle, missing children, strange lights in the sky, or ghost sightings might or might not be magical in nature, but unless you can assuage citizens' concerns with a successful DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check, you lose 2d6 points of Influence.

Unexpected Magic: Magic can be unpredictable, especially when many magic items are stored in close proximity. Through the unpredictable results of overlapping and interacting magic auras, or perhaps as a result of a damaged magic item or leaking potion, a strange magical event occurs. The event is minor 75% of the time, causing flashing lights, strange smells, or unusual sounds. Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge (arcana) check in this case. On a success, you learn something useful about how to store magic and gain 1 point of Magic. The other 25% of the time, the interaction is dangerous—a sudden explosion of fire, the accidental animation of an object, the summoning of a hungry monster, and so on. These events should be tailored by the GM, but should be comparable in power to a trap or monster encounter of your level.

Table: Magical Academy Events
d% Event
01–10 Unexpected grant
11–20 Student discovery
21–40 Roll on Table: Military Academy Events
41–45 Bitter student
46–70 Magical waste
71–80 Experiment amok
81–90 Explosion
91–100 Hazing gone wrong

Bitter Student: Whether the pupil is dissatisfied with a grade or was expelled and now holds a grudge, this student has it in for your academy. The bitter student is adept at hiding out—he could be anyone! Until you expose the bitter student, each time you'd roll an event for this building, you must roll twice, and the GM chooses the worse of the two results. When you roll this event, immediately roll twice on the Generic Building Events table, and the GM chooses which of the two possible events occurs. You can try to find and expose the student once per day by attempting a DC 30 Perception check. The DC lowers by 1 for each prior failure as you get closer to identifying the culprit. The bitter student is exposed automatically if you reroll this event as either of your two rolls.

Experiment Amok: a student's experiment has broken loose! This is a monster chosen by the GM, with a CR equal to your average party level—usually a construct, outsider, or even an undead, though your favored type of magic may mean other kinds of creatures are possible. You must defeat the monster in combat (your students flee the creature, but other PCs may help you defeat it if they are present). At the end of each combat round the monster remains alive, its rampage deals damage to the building, costing 1 point of Goods, Magic, or Labor (chosen randomly each time).

Explosion: Treat this as the explosion event for the Alchemist building.

Hazing Gone Wrong: One of your students is the victim of a cruel prank at the hands of the other students. The hazing event is shameful and dangerous, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence as the community learns of it. You must succeed at a DC 20 Heal or Spellcraft check to help the student. If you fail the check, the student dies or is permanently maimed, and you lose another 2d6 points of Influence, 1d6 points of Labor, and 1d3 points of Magic in dealing with the repercussions of the hazing.

Student Discovery: A student makes an unexpected discovery. You gain 1d3 points of Magic.

Magical Waste: A student ruins some equipment or wastes some magic. You lose 1d3 points of Magic.

Unexpected Grant: Your academy has attracted the right kind of attention. You gain 2d4 points of Goods, and the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Table: Menagerie Events
d% Event
01–20 Exotic donation
21–55 Festival
56–60 Contagion
61–75 Escaped animal
76–90 Lost visitor
91–100 Unruly druid

Contagion: The creatures in your Menagerie suffer from a mysterious malady. Treat this as the sickness event from Generic Building Events, and your building gains the broken condition until the sickness is ended.

Escaped Animal: One of your exhibits escapes its cage. If you keep track of specific creatures, determine the escaped creature randomly. Attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal, Perception, Survival, or wild empathy check (or if the escaped creature is intelligent, a Bluff or Diplomacy check) to find the creature and safely return it to its cage. If you fail, you lose 1d6 points of Influence and 1d4 points of Labor, and the building generates no capital that day.

Exotic Donation: An eccentric aristocrat, adventurer, explorer, or other individual delivers an unusual creature to add to your exhibit. The type of creature is determined by the GM—you might need to expend additional resources (typically 1d6 points of Goods and 1d3 points of Labor) or craft a special room to house particularly unusual creatures. If you take the creature, you gain 2d6 points of Influence.

Festival: The settlement or an important person wants to use your Menagerie as the site for an upcoming festival. Make a note of your current Influence. Roll 2d6 to determine how many days will pass until the Festival takes place. If on the day of the Festival your Influence is lower than it was on the day of the request, the Festival is cancelled and you lose an additional 1d6 points of Influence. Otherwise, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal or Perform check. If you succeed, your Menagerie gets a +20 bonus on its first check to generate capital that day.

Lost Visitor: a visitor becomes lost. Attempt a DC 20 Perception check. If you succeed, you find the lost person and the event ends with no drawbacks. If you fail this check, the visitor has a 50% chance of being wounded or killed—if this occurs, you lose 1d6 points of Influence. If the lost visitor isn't wounded or killed, you must attempt the Perception check again each hour with a cumulative +2 bonus; repeat until you find the missing visitor or the visitor is wounded or killed.

Unruly Druid: An unruly druid embarks on a crusade against your Menagerie. The druid continues to harass your building until you succeed at a DC 30 Diplomacy or Knowledge (nature) check to mollify her, or until you detain or defeat her in combat. While the druid is acting against your Menagerie, all checks related to the building that you make take a –5 penalty.

Table: Military Academy Events
d% Event
01–10 Famous alumnus
11–20 Unexpected grant
21–45 Competition
46–60 Scandal
61–65 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
66–80 Spoiled student
81–100 Duel

Competition: Several teachers and classes organize an impromptu competition between students. This competition could be a classic tournament, a mock battle, a military recreation, or even a series of gladiatorial bloodsports. If you spend 1d3 points of Goods to outfit the participants with particularly flashy equipment, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and your building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Duel: Two students or teachers have a dispute that must be settled with a duel to the death. You can prevent the duel by spending 1d4 points of Influence or succeeding at a DC 25 Diplomacy or Intimidate check. Otherwise, you lose 1 point of Labor and 1d2 points of Influence.

Famous Alumnus: An old veteran or beloved hero who either attended your academy or is otherwise associated with its traditions comes to visit. The visit lasts 2d6 days, during which you gain 1 point of Influence each day. The visitor demands a significant amount of your personal time. If you don't spend the majority of your time each day wining and dining your visitor, she loses interest and leaves, costing you 2d6 points of Influence.

Scandal: Some sort of scandal strikes your academy — an affair between a teacher and a student, a destructive prank or dangerous hazing, a student brawling with a noble's son, or the like. The scandal's repercussions last 2d4 days. During that period, it's difficult for anyone at the academy to concentrate, the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital, and you lose 1d2 points of Influence each day. Once per day, you can attempt to repair the damage to your reputation and end the event with a successful DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Failure extends the duration of the scandal's fallout by another 1d4 days.

Spoiled Student: a student accustomed to an easier life demands special treatment. If you don't provide it by spending 1d4 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence, the student threatens to quit the academy. Attempt a DC 25 Intimidate check. If you fail, the student and several toadies leave, costing you 2d6 points of Labor. If you succeed, only the student leaves, costing you 1d4 points of Labor. If you beat the DC of this check by 10 or more, the student stays (this costs you no Labor) and works hard; this impresses the student's parents, who praise your academy, and earns you 1d6 points of Influence.

Unexpected Grant: See the event of the same name in the Magical Academy Events section.

Table: Monastery Events
d% Event
01–05 Visiting relic
06–25 Productive day
26–35 Traveling priest
36–60 Holy day
61–75 Inquisitor
76–85 Monster attack
86–95 Scandal
96–100 Roll on Table: Temple Events

Holy Day: Today is a holy day — this could be a minor day of worship or a significant event. If your monastery is philosophical rather than religious, this might be a birthday or the anniversary of a significant historical event. Attempt a DC 25 Knowledge (history) or Knowledge (religion) check. If you succeed, you gain 1d6 points of Influence and your Monastery gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Inquisitor: An inquisitor of your faith arrives at your Monastery, following up on rumors that there are heretics, blasphemers, or worse hidden within. She stays at your Monastery for 2d4 days. Each day, you must attempt a DC 20 Diplomacy or Knowledge (religion) check to appease the Inquisitor and avoid losing 1d2 points of Influence. If your Monastery is affected by a scandal event while the Inquisitor is present, she immediately halts the scandal but you lose 1d6 points of Labor.

Monster Attack: Something dangerous (with a total CR equal to your character level + 1) attacks your Monastery — a dangerous monster from the wilds, tribe of savage humanoids, or rival cult. The initial attack causes you to lose 1d6 points of Goods, Labor, and Magic (split however you wish). Every 1d6 days, the antagonists return to attack again, costing you capital again until they're defeated. If you don't defeat the menace yourself, you can hire adventurers to do so at a cost equal to your character level × 1,000 gp.

Productive Day: The Monastery is particularly productive today. The building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Scandal: This is the same as the scandal event from Military Academy Events, except a Monastery scandal lasts for 2d6 days. You can attempt to repair the reputation damage from a Monastery scandal with a DC 30 Bluff, Diplomacy, or Knowledge (religion) check.

Traveling Priest: A traveling priest of your faith arrives at the Monastery. She stays for 1d6 days, during which the Monastery gains a +4 bonus on all checks (but only on one check to generate capital per day). If you ever lose any Labor while the traveling priest is visiting, she reduces the amount of Labor lost by 1d4 (minimum of 0).

Visiting Relic: Your Monastery has been selected as the resting place for a traveling reliquary for 1d4 days. You gain 1d4 points of Influence each day the relic is housed in your Monastery.

Table: Shop Events
d% Event
01–30 Busy day
31–45 Slow day
46–60 Shoplifter
61–75 Embezzler
76–90 Burglary
91–95 Protection racket
96–100 Robbery

Burglary: Thieves have attempted to break into your Shop to steal your items. You can immediately spend 1d6 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Perception check. On a success, your building's defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. On a failure, you lose 1d4 points of Goods. The GM may allow you to pursue or track down the thieves as an adventure hook.

Busy Day: For whatever reason, your Shop is particularly busy today. If you spend the day at the Shop helping customers, the building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Embezzler: One of your employees is skimming your profits. You can attempt a DC 25 Perception or Sense Motive check to catch the employee in the act. If you catch and fire the employee, you lose 1 point of Labor. If you don't catch the employee, you lose 1 point of Influence and the building's next check to generate capital takes a –10 penalty. The dishonest employee waits 1d6 days before acting again. You can attempt a new Perception or Sense Motive check each time the embezzler acts, with the DC decreasing by 1 each time until you catch the employee as he becomes more brazen. If for some reason you catch the employee and don't fire him, he waits 2d6 days to embezzle again unless you somehow force him to stop.

Protection Racket: Thugs attempt to extort money from your Shop for "protection." You can pay their demand (an amount equal to the building's maximum possible gp earned in a day) or attempt to scare them off with a DC 25 Intimidate check. If you fail to run them off, they steal an amount of merchandise and cash equal to twice their initial demand plus 1d4 points of Goods.

Robbery: Someone has targeted your store or employees for a quick robbery. There is a 75% chance this is just a crime of opportunity and a 25% chance that this is a planned attack on your Shop. Treat the event as the criminal activity event from Generic Building Events; if it is a planned attack, increase the Influence needed to prevent the attack to 2d6, the Intimidate DC to 25, and the cost of the robbery to 2d6 points of Goods.

Shoplifter: a customer tries to walk out of your Shop with a valuable item. Attempt a DC 20 Perception check. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods.

Slow Day: For some reason, no one's coming to the Shop today. If you don't spend the day at the Shop, it earns no capital for the day.

Table: Smithy Events
d% Event
01–15 Special request
16–20 Unforeseen masterwork
21–25 Exotic metal
26–30 Valuable ore
31–35 Roll on Table: Shop Events
36–50 Forge waste
51–65 Supply problems
66–80 Forced commission
81–100 Deadly accident

Deadly Accident: This is the same as the deadly accident event from Generic Building Events, except that there is also a 25% chance that the accident starts a fire (as the fire event in same section).

Exotic Metal: A supplier offers to sell you a small amount of cold iron, mithral, or adamantine (up to 1,000 gp worth) at a 20% discount. You may spend Goods, Magic, or gp to pay for this metal.

Forced Commission: A government official requires a specific commission, but refuses to pay for the service, claiming it is your duty to support the government. If you comply with this demand, completing the work takes 1d4 days, and the building generates no income for that period of time. If you resist, the official goes elsewhere, and you lose 1d6 points of Influence.

Forge Waste: An employee ruins some equipment or refined metal. Attempt a DC 30 Craft check appropriate to your Smithy. If you succeed, you are able to salvage much of the metal and only lose 1 point of Goods. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods.

Special Request: A famous hero, noble, military commander, or similar notable comes to your Smithy with a special request for an unusual or masterwork item—perhaps manacles, a cage, exotic barding, or a replacement piece for an iron golem. For 1d4 days, as payments come in for the request, your building gains a +20bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. At the end of this period, attempt a DC 30 Craft check of the appropriate type. On a success, your Smithy has done so well on the request that the customer spreads the word of your skill and you gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Supply Problems: Your suppliers have a problem—a road is washed out, bandits are thick in the wilds, or an important caravan has been attacked by a monster. In any event, your necessary supplies are running low. You lose 1d3 points of Goods, and for 1d4 days this building takes a –5 penalty on its checks to generates capital.

Unforeseen Masterwork: Normally, it takes focus, time, and skill to forge a masterwork object, but by chance one of your workers manages to produce one accidentally. You gain 1d10 × 10 gp or 1d10 points of Goods (your choice) for the sale of this item.

Valuable Ore: Your suppliers send a particularly fine shipment of iron ore or steel bars. You gain 1d4 points of Goods. There's a 5% chance that the supplier also included precious metals or gemstones worth 5d20 gp by mistake. If you give these back to the supplier instead of keeping them, you gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Table: Stable Events
d% Event
01–15 Famous visitor
16–30 Emergency request
31–45 Crazed horse
46–65 Predators
66–80 Runaway
81–95 Horse thieves
96–100 Stable fire

Crazed Horse: One of the horses in your Stable goes berserk—perhaps it smells a predator, it dislikes another horse, or someone tried to steal it and fled. You must attempt a DC 25 Handle Animal, Ride, or wild empathy check to calm the horse down. If you fail, the horse runs amok, costing you 1d3 points of Goods and 1d2 points of Influence, and there's a 25% chance of having an immediate runaway event (see below).

Emergency Request: A desperate soldier, messenger, or traveler comes to you with an emergency request—she needs to borrow one or several of the horses in your Stable. If you agree to the request, you gain 1d6 points of Influence but will be short on horses for 2d4 days, during which time your building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. If you ignore the request, the event ends with no penalty or cost to you.

Famous Visitor: A well-known ranger, a messenger for a king, or someone of equal import stables a mount in your building. If you succeed at a DC 20 Handle Animal check, you impress the visitor enough to gain 1d4 points of Influence as she spreads the word of the quality of your stabling. If you roll a 4 on the 1d4 roll, you instead gain 3 points of Influence and 1 point of Magic.

Horse Thieves: Thieves attempt to steal some of your horses. You can immediately spend 1d4 points of Influence to negate this attempt. Otherwise, attempt a DC 25 Intimidate or Perception check. If you succeed, your building's defenses work, the thieves are caught, and you gain 1d2 points of Influence. If you fail, you lose 1d4 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence. The GM may allow you to pursue or track down the thieves as an adventure hook.

Predators: Wild animals or monsters have snuck into your Stable. This could be something as minor as a few giant rats or a wild dog, or as major as a wyvern or young dragon (the GM chooses the creature). You must defend your Stable against the predators in combat or you lose 1d6 points of Goods and 1d4 points of Influence.

Runaway: One or more horses in your Stable wander off or run away. Attempt a DC 25 Perception or Survival check to track the horses down. If you fail, you lose 1d6 points of Influence and for the next 1d4 days this building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Stable Fire: Treat this as the fire event from the Generic Building Events section. If it is a minor fire, there is also a 50% chance that your Stable also has a crazed horse event.

Table: Tavern Events
d% Event
01–15 Drinking contest
16–30 Shenanigans
31–50 Bar brawl
51–65 Rousing performance
66–75 Protection racket
76–85 Notorious visitor
86–100 Taproom trouble

Bar Brawl: One insult against someone's lineage or beard or beauty, and the next thing you know, there's a fight! Word of the brawl helps spread your Tavern's infamy—you gain 1d4 points of Influence. Attempt a DC 20 Intimidate check. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Labor, and Magic (divided as the GM chooses) because of damage to your building.

Drinking Contest: Two patrons challenge each other to a drinking contest. They demand the good stuff in order to make the contest count. Your building gains a +10 bonus on its next check to generate capital. There is a 25% chance this event happens again the next day.

Notorious Visitor: A well-known criminal, evil adventurer, or known local troublemaker visits your Tavern with his cronies. There's a 50% chance the visitor starts a bar brawl (as the event above). Otherwise, his presence causes regulars to leave, halving the capital the building generates during the next Income phase. At the GM's discretion, this event could lead to more difficulties with the visitor if he feels you treat him poorly.

Protection Racket: This is the same as the protection racket event from the Shop Events section.

Rousing Performance: A talented bard gives a rousing performance at your Tavern, delighting your customers. You gain 1d3 points of Influence, your building gains a +20bonus on its next check to generate capital, and there's a 25% chance the bard's performance triggers a shenanigans event (see below).

Shenanigans: In some businesses shenanigans would be considered a scandal, but in a Tavern these ribald activities are a boon. Perhaps someone important met with a prostitute, or maybe someone's spouse got a little friendly with an employee. Attempt a Bluff or Diplomacy check (DC equals 20 + 1d6). If you succeed, you treat the incident with the proper discretion; you gain 1d4 points of Influence and someone involved gives you a tip of 1d20 gp for your tact. If you fail, there are no negative repercussions for you or your business.

Taproom Trouble: Something's gone bad in the kitchen. Foul beer, bad fish, spoiled stew — whatever the cause is, it's making the customers sick. You can avoid any negative repercussions by spending 1d2 points of Magic on potions or medicinal elixirs or succeeding at a DC 20 Heal check. Otherwise, bad word of mouth costs you 2d6 points of Influence, and for the next 2d6 days the building takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital.

Table: Temple Events
d% Event
01 Major miracle
02–05 Sacred ritual
06–25 Ceremony request
26–35 Important visitor
36–75 Healing request
76–80 Minor miracle
81–95 Scandal
96–100 Roll on Table: Monastery Events

Ceremony Request: A local person with a good reputation or high social rank has requested a special ceremony from your Temple — a wedding, funeral, blessing for a new business venture, or other service chosen by the GM. Attempt a DC 20 Knowledge (religion) check. If you succeed, the ceremony is particularly well received and you gain 1d3 points of Influence and 2d20 gp in donations.

Healing Request: Someone has been hurt, has fallen ill, or is otherwise in need of magical healing. You can perform the healing yourself by expending 1d4 spell levels worth of healing spells, or by spending 1d6 points of Magic. If you perform the healing for free, you gain 2d4 points of Influence. If you charge for the healing, your building gains a +20 bonus on its next check to generate capital.

Important Visitor: A cleric, inquisitor, paladin, or other notable holy person associated with your faith or an allied faith visits your Temple. If you succeed at a DC 20 Diplomacy check, the visitor stays 1d8 days. Each day the visitor remains, you gain 1 point of Influence and the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Major Miracle: a major miracle occurs at your Temple or to one of its faithful, such as recovering from a terminal illness, permanent blindness, or another debilitating affliction. You gain 2d4 points of Influence, and for 1d6 days you and all allies who worship your deity gain a +2 sacred bonus on Fortitude and Will saving throws. You may also tread this as a sacred ritual event.

Minor Miracle: a minor miracle occurs at your Temple or to one of its faithful in the form of a vision, good omen, unexpected recovery from sickness, or the like. You gain 1d4 points of Influence, and for 1d4 days you and all allies who worship your deity gain a +2 sacred bonus on Fortitude or Will saving throws (choose one).

Sacred Ritual: a ritual sacred to your faith is performed today at your Temple. Spend 2d4 points of Magic and attempt a DC 20 Knowledge (religion) check—if you succeed, faith runs high and you can choose one of the following effects to persist for 1d6 days: the building gains a +10 bonus on all checks (but only one check to generate capital per day), you gain a +2 bonus on one type of skill check, or you may prepare an additional domain spell of your highest domain spell level each day.

Scandal: This is the same as the scandal event for a Monastery, except a Temple scandal lasts for 1d8 days. There's a 10% chance the scandal involves the influence of a rival faith, in which case you gain a rivalry as well (see Generic Building Events).

Table: Theater Events
d% Event
01–10 Rave reviews
11–25 Full house
26–35 Visiting troupe
36–55 Shenanigans
56–70 Poor performance
71–90 Prima donna
91–95 Cursed play
96–100 House fire

Cursed Play: Something has cursed your Theater or its current production. Perhaps an actor quoted a line from an unlucky play, or the script has the power to drive people mad. Attempt a DC 25 Perform check each day. If you fail, the Theater generates no capital that day. If you succeed, the curse and the event end.

Full House: Your Theater is packed—an excellent opportunity to impress people. You gain a +20 bonus on the building's next check to generate capital. Attempt a DC 25 Perform check. If you succeed, word of the performance spreads and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. If you fail, there's a 50% chance that a poor performance event occurs.

House Fire: Treat this as a fire event from the Generic Building Events section, except there is a 50% chance of a minor fire and a 50% chance of a major fire. Increase any lost capital from the event by 50%.

Poor Performance: Everyone has off nights, but your entire cast is missing cues and flubbing lines. You lose 2d4 points of Influence from bad reviews and 1d3 points of Labor from performers who quit out of shame.

Prima Donna: One of your performers is particularly temperamental today. You can assuage the performer's ego with a DC 25 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Otherwise, the performer demands last-minute changes and makes ridiculous demands of the support staff. You lose 1d4 points of Goods and take a –5 penalty on all checks relating to this building for 1d6 days.

Rave Reviews: Your Theater has done well, and great reviews pour in. You gain 1d6 points of Influence.

Shenanigans: This event is similar to the shenanigans event from the Tavern Events section, though those involved in Theater shenanigans tend to be wealthier and more prominent. If you succeed at a DC 30 Bluff or Diplomacy check, you treat the incident with the proper discretion — you gain 1d6 points of Influence and someone involved gives you a tip of 10d10 gp for your tact.

Visiting Troupe: A group of traveling players asks to perform at your Theater. On the first day after this event, the players require full access to your Theater. Since you can't be open to the public, the building generates no capital that day. The troupe remains for 1d4 days, and on those days you gain a +20 bonus on the building's first check to generate capital each day. If the troupe is present when an event at the Theater makes you lose Labor, the troupe leaves early.

Organization Events

Unlike with buildings, there is no generic organization event table.

Table: Cabal Events
d% Event
01–05 Discovery
06–20 Arcane flux
21–30 Work opportunity
31–50 Portent
51–60 Roll on Table: Caster's Tower Events
61–75 Roll on Table: Magical Academy Events
76–90 Familiar scraps
91–100 Image problem

Arcane Flux: An experimental ritual performed by the Cabal has granted you additional power. Roll 1d4; you gain a bonus arcane spell slot of that spell level (as if from a high ability score, up to a maximum of the highest-level arcane spell slot you can cast) for 24 hours.

Discovery: a member of your Cabal has produced some unexpected results. Roll d%. On a result of 01–75, the Cabal creates 1d6 random 1st-level arcane scrolls (add +1 scroll if you have the Scribe Scroll feat). On a result of 76–100, the Cabal creates 1d3 random 1st-level arcane potions (add +1 potion if you have the Brew Potion feat). You may keep these potions or sell them for full value.

Familiar Scraps: Several familiars belonging to members of your Cabal are causing problems with each other or with local animals. You must succeed at a DC 25 Diplomacy, Handle Animal, or Knowledge (arcana) check, or spend 1d4 points of Goods and Influence (divided as you see fit) to calm things down.

Image Problem: An influential person, such as a conservative noble, leader of a rival organization, or professor at a local academy tries to discredit your organization. Attempt a Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Knowledge (arcana) check opposed by this person's Bluff, Intimidate, or Knowledge (arcana) check (1d20 + 5 if the GM doesn't have a specific person in mind). If you succeed, you weather the bad comments and the event ends with no negative repercussions. If you succeed by at least 5, you increase your acclaim, gaining 1 point of Influence or Labor. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Influence, Labor, and Magic (divided as you see fit) because of vandalism or members leaving out of fear.

Portent: a cabalist discovers an upcoming alignment of magical forces, increasing the cabal's productivity. For 1d3 days, the organization gains a +10 bonus on its first check each day to generate Goods, Influence, or Magic.

Work Opportunity: a noble, merchant, or other patron hires your Cabal to assist with magical preparations for a ritual or festival. For 1d6 days, the organization gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. If you rolled a 6 for the number of days, there's a 20% chance this causes a discovery event as described above.

Table: Cult Events
d% Event
01–05 Divine flux
06–20 Portent
21–45 Popular ritual
46–60 Roll on Table: Temple Events
61–75 Image problem
76–90 Apostate
91–95 Blasphemy
96–100 Schism

Apostate: a member of your Cult leaves and badmouths you to outsiders. For 1d6 days, the organization takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. If you rolled a 6 for the number of days, there's a 50% chance the end of this event causes an image problem event as described below. Silencing the apostate (through threats, violence, or bribes worth 1d6 points of Goods or Influence) ends this penalty early.

Blasphemy: Someone in your Cult has broken a serious taboo. All divine casters in the Cult treat their caster level as 1 lower than normal for 1d3 days.

Divine Flux: Treat this as an arcane flux event on the Cabal Events table, except the bonus spell slot is divine instead of arcane.

Image Problem: An influential person, such as a conservative noble or leader of a rival church, attempts to discredit your organization. Attempt a Bluff, Diplomacy, or Intimidate check opposed by this person's Bluff or Intimidate check (1d20 + 5 if the GM doesn't have a specific person in mind). Success means you weather these attempts and the event ends with no negative repercussions. If you win by at least 5, you increase your fame, gaining your choice of 1 point of Influence or Labor. If you fail, you lose 1d3 points of Goods, Influence, and Labor (divided as you see fit) because of vandalism or members leaving out of fear.

Popular Ritual: One of your unusual customs, such as frequent use of hallucinogens or naked dancing, increases the Cult's popularity. For 1d8 days, the building gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate Influence or Labor each day. If you rolled an 8 for the number of days, there's a 50% chance the end of this event causes an image problem event as described above.

Portent: One of your members has a vision or interprets something as a religious sign, increasing religious fervor among the other followers. Choose Goods, Influence, or Labor. For 2d6 days, the Cult gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate that type of capital each day.

Schism: A popular member of your Cult tries to steal some of your people and create her own Cult. Attempt a Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Knowledge (religion) check against a DC equal to 20 + the number of teams in the organization. If you succeed, treat this as an apostate event as described above. If you fail by less than 5, you lose 1d2 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor. If you fail by 5 or more, you lose one team for every 5 full points by which you failed the DC. These lost teams go with the apostate.

Table: Mercenary Company Events
d% Event
01–15 Impressive results
16–25 Windfall
26–50 Brawl
51–70 Rivalry
71–80 Scandal
81–85 Duel
86–95 Schism
96–100 Mutiny

Brawl: This functions like the bar brawl in Tavern Events, except you may attempt a Profession (soldier) check instead of an Intimidate check, and a failed check causes a loss of Influence and Labor.

Duel: This functions like the duel event from the Military Academy Events section, except you may attempt a Profession (soldier) check instead of a Diplomacy or Intimidate check.

Impressive Results: Your mercenaries perform admirably, eliminating a problem quickly or defeating a more powerful opponent with ease. You gain 1d4 points of Influence and 1d2 points of Labor, and for 1d6 days the organization gains a +10 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day.

Mutiny: A member tries to take over the group, either by challenging you to a fight or by an underhanded method like attacking you while you sleep. You may handle this as a combat encounter or attempt a DC 25 Bluff, Intimidate, or Profession (soldier) check. If you succeed, the instigator leaves and you lose 1 point of Labor but gain 1d2 points of Influence. If you fail, you lose control of the Mercenary Company as if from business attrition.

Rivalry: Another mercenary group is stealing jobs from your organization. Treat this as the rivalry event from Generic Building Events, except you can also end the rivalry and gain 1d4 points of Influence by beating the leader in a duel (as the duel Military Academy event, but not necessarily to the death).

Scandal: Some sort of scandal strikes your company — a member is accused of murder or one of your teams injures locals in a bar fight. For 2d4 days you lose 1d2 points of Influence each day and the organization takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital. Once per day, you can attempt to repair the damage to your reputation and end the event with a DC 20 Bluff or Diplomacy check. Failure extends the duration of the scandal's fallout by another 1d4 days.

Schism: This functions as the schism from the Cult Events section, except that the skills you can use to attempt to end it are Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Profession (soldier), and that succeeding at the check means you lose 1 point of Labor and the event ends.

Windfall: Your organization is rewarded handsomely for its recent efforts, either with payment from a grateful employer or rich spoils from looting an enemy. You gain 1d10 × 10 gp, 1d6 points of Goods, and 1 point of Magic.

Table: Thieves' Guild Events
d% Event
01–10 Big Heist
11–30 Crime Spree
31–45 Rivalry
46–60 Crackdown
61–70 Entrapment
71–90 Meddling Adventurers
91–100 Mutiny

Big Heist: You have the opportunity to take on a risky but profitable job. If you accept, attempt a DC 30 Disable Device, Sleight of Hand, or Stealth check. If you succeed, the guild gains a +20 bonus on its next check to generate capital and you gain 1d4 points of Influence. If you fail, the guild automatically rolls a 1 on all checks to generate capital for 1 day, and you lose 1 point of Influence. If you fail by 10 or more, there's a 25% chance that a team involved in the heist is captured (treat this as the entrapment event).

Crackdown: Local authorities are going out of their way to stifle crime. For 1d6 days, your guild takes a –5 penalty on checks to generate capital, and if you fail a DC 20 Stealth check by 10 or more, one of your teams is captured (as the entrapment event described below).

Crime Spree: Lady Luck has her eye on the settlement's criminals. For 1d4 days, your guild gains a +5 bonus on its first check to generate capital each day. Each of these days you use the guild to generate capital, there's 10% chance you have to deal with a meddling adventurers event as described below.

Entrapment: A lucrative job turns out to be a plot by the city guard to catch thieves, and one of your teams is arrested. You must spend 5 points of Influence or 1d10 × 5 gp to get the team out of jail; if you don't, the team members are imprisoned, or (depending on the local laws against thievery) are executed 1d10 days later. Either result costs you the entire team and 1d6 points of Influence for letting it happen. Alternatively, you can attempt to break the team out of jail—the GM should create a combat encounter or short adventure if you try this solution.

Meddling Adventurers: Unusually competent do-gooders sniff around your territory and spar with your teams. You must succeed at a DC 25 Disable Device, Sleight of Hand, or Stealth check or lose 1d6 points of Goods because of their activities. If you succeed by 10 or more, you gain 1d3 points of Influence for trouncing the adventurers. If you fail by 10 or more, one of your teams is captured (treat this as the entrapment event described above).

Mutiny: This functions like the mutiny event in the Mercenary Company Events table, except you may resolve the event with a different kind of challenge (such as racing through a gauntlet of traps instead of a duel, requiring several skill checks) and you can't attempt a Profession (soldier) check to end the event.

Rivalry: Another guild is moving in on your territory. Treat this as the rivalry event from Generic Building Events, except you can also end the rivalry and gain 1d4 points of Influence by beating the leader in a duel (as the duel event on the Mercenary Company Event table, but not necessarily to the death) or a thieving challenge.