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Troth of the Forgotten Pharaoh

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You’ve pledged your body to a forgotten pharaoh, and are willing to sacrifice yourself to keep his secrets even in death.

Prerequisite(s): Must be a member of a cult of a forgotten pharaoh.

Benefit: Upon taking this feat, you undergo a ritual wherein the cartouche of a pharaoh is carved into your flesh (typically on the chest or back), and then embellished with painful crimson and ocher tattoos. The ritual takes 1 hour to complete, and you take 3 points of damage from the wound (see Special, below). Upon completion of the ritual, you gain the feat’s benefits.

As an immediate action, or when you die, you can cause white-hot fire to burst from the tattooed cartouche on your flesh, immolating your body in a bright flash and instantly reducing it to ash. If you are still alive, you are immediately slain. Spells such as raise dead or speak with dead cannot be used on your remains, but your equipment is unaffected.

As the fire consumes you, fiery snakes whip out of your body in a 5-foot-radius burst, dealing 1d6 points of fire damage + 1 point per character level. Creatures in the area can attempt a Reflex save to negate the damage (DC 10 + 1/2 your character level + your Constitution modifier). In addition, creatures within a 10-foot burst must succeed at a Fortitude save (DC 10 + 1/2 your character level + your Constitution modifier) or be blinded for 1 round. Blind or sightless creatures are unaffected by this blinding effect.

Special: You permanently lose 3 hit points when you take this feat. This damage can be healed only with a miracle or wish spell, but doing so causes you to lose all benefits of this feat.


Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Adventure Path #82: Secrets of the Sphinx © 2014, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Amber E. Scott, with Michael Kortes, Amber E. Scott, David Schwartz, Russ Taylor, Greg A. Vaughan, and Larry Wilhelm.