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Vehicles

Vehicle Statistics

Below are explanations of some of the traits noted in vehicle statistics. If information for a given category is not listed in a given stat block, it is not applicable.

Note: See Vehicles for information relating to maneuvering vehicles, combat involving vehicles, and more.

Name: The name of the vehicle.

Size and Type: Divided into land, sea, and air.

Squares: The typical size of the vehicle is measured in a number of squares, followed by the standard configuration of those squares.

Cost: The vehicle’s cost in gp. Sometimes the description or the weapons section provides possible modifications for the vehicles. These are not included in the cost of the vehicle, nor are additions like rams or siege engines.

AC and Hardness: This is the AC and harness of the vehicle. The AC assumes the vehicle is in motion and the driver has not modified the AC with his driving skill. If the vehicle is not in motion, it has an effective Dexterity of 0 (–5 penalty to AC), and an additional –2 penalty to its AC.

hp: While a vehicle can be attacked in combat, it is often hard to significantly damage large vehicles. When a vehicle reaches the hit point total in the parentheses, it is broken. A vehicle’s hit points do not factor in its method of propulsion or the driving device. They have their own statistics.

Base Save: Each vehicle has a base save modifier. All of the vehicle’s saving throws (Fortitude, Reflex, and Will) have the same value. This is the vehicle’s save before the driver modifies it with his driving check.

Maximum Speed: This is the fastest that a vehicle can move. When a vehicle has more than one method of propulsion, it may also have more than one maximum speed.

CMB and CMD: The CMB an CMD before the driver modifies it with his driving check modifier.

Acceleration: This is how fast a vehicle can increase its speed each round. It also determines the maximum amount a vehicle can safely decelerate each round.

Propulsion: The type and amount of propulsion required.

Driving Check: The skills typically used to make a vehicle driving check with this vehicle.

Forward Facing: The direction of the vehicle’s forward facing.

Driving Device: The typical driving device the driver manipulates when driving the vehicle.

Driving Space: The size and the location of the vehicle’s driving space.

Crew: This is the number of crew members, in addition to the driver, needed to move the vehicle.

Decks: The number of decks and any important information about those decks is given in this section.

Weapons: Some vehicles can be equipped with siege weapons. This is the number of siege or vehicle weapons that a vehicle can have.

Table: Vehicle Costs and Maximum Speeds

Land Vehicles
Vehicle Cost Maximum Speed Size Passengers
Carriage 100 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 15 ft.; 6 feet high driver +5
Cart 15 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) –10 ft. 5 ft. by 10 ft.; 4 feet high n/a
Chariot, Light 50 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 5 ft. by 10 ft.; 5 feet high driver
Chariot, Medium 100 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 10 ft.; 5 feet high
Chariot, Heavy 200 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 15 ft.; 5 feet high
Dog Sled 20 gp


Sleigh 100 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s), or 100 ft. (current) 10 ft. by 10 ft.; 3 feet high or 13 feet high with sail
Steam Giant 80,000 gp 60 ft. 20 ft. by 20 ft.; 26 feet high 4 crew +6
Wagon, Light 50 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 10 ft.; 5 feet high
Wagon, Medium 75 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 15 ft.; 5 feet high
Wagon, Heavy 100 gp Twice the speed of the pulling creature(s) 10 ft. by 20 ft.; 5 feet high
Water Vehicles
Vehicle Cost Maximum Speed Length Passengers
Barge1 1/2 mile/hour or 5 miles/day (poled or towed) 80–150 ft. 50–150
Galley 10,000 gp 180 ft. (current) or 60 ft. (rowed)
or
4 miles/hour or 96 miles/day
20 ft. by 130 ft.
Galley, Dromon

100–150 ft. 200–400
Galley, Slave

100–150 ft. 200–400
Keelboat1 13,000 gp 60 ft. (current) or 30 ft. (rowed)
or
1 mile/hour or 10 miles/day (both rowed)
20 ft. by 50 ft. 4–104
Longship 10,000 gp 120 ft. (current and muscle) or 30 ft. (rowed)
or
3 miles/hour or 72 miles/day
15 ft. by 75 ft. 50–150
Rowboat1 50 gp 30 ft.
or
1 1/2 miles/hour or 15 miles/day
5 ft. by 15 ft. 1-3
Rowboat, Jollyboat

20 ft. 2-10
Sailing Ship 10,000 gp 180 ft. (current) or 60 ft. (rowed)
or
2 miles/hour or 48 miles/day
20 ft. by 75 ft.
Sailing Ship, Brigantine

30–50 ft. 20–140
Sailing Ship, Caravel

30–50 ft. 20–140
Sailing Ship, Carrack

50–100 ft. 20–140
Sailing Ship, Cutter

30–50 ft. 4-104
Sailing Ship, Sloop

30–50 ft. 4-104
Warship 25,000 gp 150 ft. (current) or 60 ft. (rowed)
or
2 1/2 miles/hour or 60 miles/day
20 ft. by 100 ft.
Warship, Frigate

75–120 ft. 60–220
Warship, Galleon

75–120 ft. 60–220
Warship, Man-of-War

90–130 ft. 60–220
Warship, Xebec

70–110 ft. 60–220
Air Vehicles
Vehicle Cost Maximum Speed Length Passengers
Airship 50,000 gp 100 ft. 20 ft. by 60 ft. 100
Alchemical Dragon 100,000 gp 100 ft. 20 ft. by 75 ft. 10 crew +70
Glider 500 gp 80 ft. 10 ft. by 10 ft.

1 Rafts, barges, keelboats, and rowboats are most often used on lakes and rivers. If going downstream, add the speed of the current (typically 3 miles per hour) to the speed of the vehicle. In addition to 10 hours of being rowed, the vehicle can also float an additional 14 hours, if someone can guide it, adding an additional 42 miles to the daily distance traveled. These vehicles can’t be rowed against any significant current, but they can be pulled upstream by draft animals on the shores.

Land Vehicles

Land vehicles carry occupants and cargo over hard earth or similar terrain. They are typically propelled by muscle, but can be moved by a variety of propulsion methods. The following are the most common types of land vehicles.

Water Vehicles

Water vehicles move across bodies of water, whether as small as a river or as large as an ocean. They are typically propelled by muscle or sail, but can be moved by a variety of propulsion methods. The following are the most common types of water vehicles.

Air Vehicles

Air vehicles fly through the air. They are usually propelled by air currents, alchemical engines, magic, or in the case of larger air vehicles, a mix of air currents and alchemical engines or magic. Airships, because of their nature, travel though all three dimensions instead of two. When they ascend, they must do so at half their current speed. When air vehicles descend, they can (but do not have to) move at double their current speed. After the ascent or descent, treat the vehicle’s current speed as it was before making the ascent or descent.