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Corpse Lotus



Planted in soil fertilized with corpses, this giant, blood-red flower is surrounded by prickly vines.

Corpse Lotus CR 13

XP 25,600
N Huge plant
Init +4; Senses darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision, tremorsense 30 ft.; Perception +21
Aura preserving mists (30 ft.)

DEFENSE

AC 28, touch 12, flat-footed 24 (+4 Dex, +16 natural, –2 size)
hp 178 (17d8+102)
Fort +16, Ref +11, Will +6
Defensive Abilities all-around vision; DR 10/slashing;
Immune plant traits; Resist acid 10, electricity 10

OFFENSE

Speed 10 ft.
Melee 4 vines +22 (1d8+12 plus grab)
Space 15 ft.; Reach 25 ft.
Special Attacks constrict (1d8+12), swallow whole (4d6 acid damage, AC 17, 17 hp)

STATISTICS

Str 34, Dex 19, Con 23, Int 2, Wis 13, Cha 14
Base Atk +12; CMB +26 (+28 bull rush); CMD 40 (42 vs. bull rush, can’t be tripped)
Feats Awesome Blow, Blind-Fight, Cleave, Combat Reflexes, Great Cleave, Improved Bull Rush, Lightning Reflexes, Power Attack, Weapon Focus (vine)
Skills Perception +21
SQ camouflage, digest corpse, preserving mists

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Camouflage (Ex)

A corpse lotus can blend in exceptionally well with vegetated areas when not taking any actions. In such an area, a creature must make a successful DC 30 Perception check to recognize a corpse lotus for what it is before the corpse lotus attacks the first time.

Digest Corpse (Su)

A corpse lotus can consume a corpse to quickly heal damage it has taken. As a standard action, a corpse lotus can swallow any corpse within reach that still has flesh attached to grant itself fast healing 10 for 1 minute. Any living creature killed by a corpse lotus’s swallow whole ability automatically triggers this ability. A corpse lotus must wait until 1 minute after its fast healing has ended before it can use this ability again.

Preserving Mists (Su)

Corpse lotuses emanate a fine mist that spreads across the ground to a range of 30 feet. Any corpse within this area is affected as if by gentle repose (CL 1st).

Vines (Ex)

A corpse lotus’s vines are primary natural attacks with the grab ability. A corpse lotus doesn’t gain the grappled condition when grappling enemies with its vines and can maintain grapples with any number of its vines with the same standard action.

ECOLOGY

Environment temperate forests or marshes
Organization solitary
Treasure incidental

A corpse lotus begins life as a small flowering plant that blooms near carrion, and if given enough time, it grows into an incredibly large and dangerous monstrosity.

This terrifying plant possesses grasping vines capable of pummeling opponents before dragging them toward its maw. Always found where carcasses are abundant, corpse lotuses have been known to grow in dungeons, ruins, graveyards, and battlefields in addition to more typical wooded or marshy locales.

Every corpse lotus has a single bulbous flower in its center, similar in shape to a lotus flower. The blossom’s petals are blood-red, and hide an acidic maw at the flower’s center. Corpse lotuses in different regions tend to resemble the dominant plant species in the surrounding area (with the exception of their distinct red petals), thus granting the plants natural camouf lage and enabling them to hide among native foliage. Their vines are thick and writhe madly when reaching for potential prey. Corpse lotuses gain their name from the gardens of dead bodies that frequently surround these large, predatory plants—usually of animals and humanoids that strayed too close to the lotus and met their deaths within its gullet.

While at rest, a corpse lotus can reach 8 feet in height and splay its leaves nearly 15 feet wide.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 5 © 2015, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Dennis Baker, Jesse Benner, John Bennett, Logan Bonner, Creighton Broadhurst, Robert Brookes, Benjamin Bruck, Jason Bulmahn, Adam Daigle, Thurston Hillman, Eric Hindley, Joe Homes, James Jacobs, Amanda Hamon Kunz, Ben McFarland, Jason Nelson, Thom Phillips, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Alistair Rigg, Alex Riggs, David N. Ross, Wes Schneider, David Schwartz, Mark Seifter, Mike Shel, James L. Sutter, and Linda Zayas-Palmer.